Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Dunedin
    Posts
    855

    Default Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    Currently I am using the standard RDC and I am concerned at the bandwidth being used. I RDC via the net and find I can use 100meg a month easily. Someone suggested that RDWC uses less bandwidth since it is via TCP/IP but would like confirmation of this before I change. In RDC I have set display to 256 colors to minimize bandwidth and turned off other options. Anyone know about the bandwidth issue??

  2. #2
    Computer Tech
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oamaru
    Posts
    5,811

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    Umm... if you are using RDC via the net then are you already using TCP/IP as this is the protocol that the internet uses.
    What do you mean by RDWC?
    What are you actually using the RDC for?
    RDC doesn't use much bandwidth at all. All that's getting transfered is the screen/display data and keyboard/mouse movements.
    I have a client who uses 2 PC's with RDC to connect to a Terminal server over a 128k connection and they can browse the net over the same link with no problems.

  3. #3
    Computer Tech
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oamaru
    Posts
    5,811

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    Forgot to add that 100MB a month is only about 3MB per day, which is pretty good I would have thought.
    How often / long do you use RDC?

  4. #4
    Where is Metla these days Chilling_Silence's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    17,146

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    I use a ton more via VNC, so be thankful
    I mostly do Bitcoin & DigiByte things these days, feel free to say hi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgb_chilling

    Before you ask a question here, or before you get upset by a response, see here:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-...ons.html#intro

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Dunedin
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    Quote Originally Posted by CYaBro
    Umm... if you are using RDC via the net then are you already using TCP/IP as this is the protocol that the internet uses.
    What do you mean by RDWC?
    What are you actually using the RDC for?
    RDC doesn't use much bandwidth at all. All that's getting transfered is the screen/display data and keyboard/mouse movements.
    I have a client who uses 2 PC's with RDC to connect to a Terminal server over a 128k connection and they can browse the net over the same link with no problems.
    RDC uses RDP to tranmit via tcp/ip, so yes it is using tcp/ip. From my understanding using RDWC (remote desktop web connection) converts the RDP to tcp/ip at the server end differently to be used with http and I wondered if this lessened bandwidth. I have Googled with no luck as to if this is correct or not. I am aware that RDWC still uses the same RDP at the sever, RDWC is just another way to connect with pros and cons for systems.

    I currently use RDC to admin Windows 2003 domain as well as a small peer to peer network and do most of it off premises. Bandwidth is not an issue for my own connection but the client has full speed 600meg limit jetstream and if I can minimize my usage it helps to keep below the limit. Hence the reason for my question. My usage varies from week to week depending on what is required. It makes no difference how I connect to these networks, either RDC or RDWC from my view, but if I can save some megs then why not. The more I read on the two options I don't think there is a difference.

  6. #6
    Where is Metla these days Chilling_Silence's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Auckland
    Posts
    17,146

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    TCP/IP is the "language" that they speak. The interenet speaks TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol). These are known as the transport layer.

    RDP/HTTP = Protocols.

    RDC & RDWC = Programs that send data via http/rdp protocols which transmits data via the selected Transport layer.

    This seems as though it needed a little clarification reading the last post and the quoted one.

    Basically one is simply another way of transmitting the same data, possibly for convenience, firewall configurations/proxies etc.
    The amount of data sent via the protocol (packet headers/sizes etc) may vary, but we're not talking anything more than a few KB here/there, nothing worth sweating over.

    Can you decrease the display bitrate using RDC?


    Chill.
    I mostly do Bitcoin & DigiByte things these days, feel free to say hi on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dgb_chilling

    Before you ask a question here, or before you get upset by a response, see here:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-...ons.html#intro

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Dunedin
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: Remote desktop v Remote Web Connection

    Hi Chilling
    When I reread my last post you are correct to clarify. I wasn't very clear in my explaination of tcp/ip and protocols. Yes I have display set to 256 and other options disabled. You have just confirmed what I have thought all along, little or no difference in bandwidth use by either option. Cheers

Similar Threads

  1. Remote Desktop Connection
    By yedn in forum PressF1
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 22-05-2007, 09:13 PM
  2. Remote Desktop Connection
    By The_End_Of_Reality in forum PressF1
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-01-2006, 08:59 PM
  3. Remote Desktop Connection
    By Chemical Ali in forum PressF1
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 24-05-2005, 03:04 PM
  4. Remote desktop connection
    By nav2u in forum PressF1
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-04-2004, 11:31 AM
  5. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17-10-2003, 10:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •