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  1. #1
    bk T
    Guest

    Default O/T Rubber Stamps

    Anyone out there knows what kind of equipment needed (for commercial) to make rubber stamps?

    Have seen it somewhere, I think it's just a small machine connected to a computer and it can make a stamp within minutes. Can't really remember the brand name of the machine, though.

  2. #2
    R2x1
    Guest

    Default Re: O/T Rubber Stamps

    Well, this is not so much a machine as a SYSTEM, and I suspect you will need a laser printer not an inkjet. Hope it helps.
    Depending on how many of each stamp pattern you make, this may be a suitable system.
    Cheers,
    R2

  3. #3
    robo
    Guest

    Default Re: O/T Rubber Stamps

    You don't mean a prototyping machine, do you? One that lays down gunk instead of ink but like an inkjet "builds" things in layers?
    robo.

  4. #4
    Graham L
    Guest

    Default Re: O/T Rubber Stamps

    That's expensive, robo. It would be a lovely toy, though.

    For traditional rubber stamps you need a mould and a heated press to force the raw rubber into the mould and vulcanize it.

    Cheap people carve lino (or a sliced potato).

  5. #5
    bk T
    Guest

    Default Re: O/T Rubber Stamps

    > You don't mean a prototyping machine, do you? One
    > that lays down gunk instead of ink but like an inkjet
    > "builds" things in layers?
    > robo.

    What is a prototyping machine? Can you elaborate a little further?

    I'm interested to learn more about rubber stamp making, like a good old rubber stamp or a common seal which requires a stamp ink pad and the more modern self-inking or pre-inked type of of stamps. I think the old traditional rubber stamp is quite different from the modern self-inking ones.

    Cheers


  6. #6
    superOman
    Guest

    Default Re: O/T Rubber Stamps

    Hi

    I can expand a bit further.
    Self inking stamps are not much different than traditional ones, except in the fact that it appears with ink on it when it is pressed down.

    This works by, when you have stamped a page, the rubber stamp part moves upwards and flips upside down and presses itself onto an ink pad, by the aid of a spring. It is flipped upside down by a Cam.

    Eventually when you have pushed the stamp many many times you will have to replace the whole stamping unit.

    As for rapid prototyping I can tell you about that as well.

    You design something you want to manufacture and make a 3d computer model of it. Either you or the customer want to see what it will look like before you spend 1000's or 100,000's on tooling to make it.

    The file goes to a rapid prototyper who you pay a lot of money to make the rapid prototype. There are many different types of rapid protyping by basically you start off with a box full of plaster, and a device runs over the top of it much like an inkjet print. Instead of ink, it spurts out a bonder, something like super glue onto the plaster to build the model.
    It puts down the glue and the 0.1 mm (or smaller) of plaster is added to the top and more glue is put down. Eventually you end up with a model

    Its not cheap, like a faceplate for a cellphone may cost you $200 or more.
    Machines are from $250,000 NZ upwards.

    heres a link to a rapid prototyper. http://www.rapidprototyping.co.nz

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