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  1. #1
    -=JM=-
    Guest

    Default Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    What is the best to use when working on a computer. Magnetic tip or non-magnetic tip screwdrivers?

    Cheers, JM

  2. #2
    godfather
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    non magnetic is recommended

    also the hammer should be de-magnetised....

  3. #3
    tweak\'e
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    two problems with magnetic drivers, don't get the tip new the floppys and that they are fatter than most screwdrivers and wont fit in tight places.


    YOU SHOULD HAVE BOTH

  4. #4
    -=JM=-
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    Thanks for that.

    I know you should keep them away from floppies. I was just wondering about general equipment.

    Surely your not going to induce a current great enough to fry components just from the screwdriver.

  5. #5
    E.ric
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    I seem to recall reading something in the NZ PC World magazine in the bookshop now, did you see it?
    Since I brought a wrightable CD drive I have given up on floppies,

    how come "NZ" is not in the spelling dictionary?
    that's two now, along with "F1" PC is there.

  6. #6
    Susan B
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    > how come "NZ" is not in the spelling dictionary?
    > that's two now, along with "F1" PC is there.


    You used the Press F1 spellcheck and it didn't pick up "wrightable"????

  7. #7
    Tom McB
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    Magnetic tips were made to get those screws in ever diminishing sizes to behave and go where they are supposed to.

    These places do not include underneath circuit boards and inside sensitive/expensive gear that go =fzzt= =crackle= =pop= =hiss= with extraneous bits of metal.

    A bit of Bostik Blu Tack on the driver tip will do - put too much and you will gunk up things (although it is not conductive - just sticky).

    Good for those with failing close up vision and manual dexterity - something I have come to accept when I <profanity omitted> cut myself assembling parts 1 & 2 of Cybot.

  8. #8
    Peter H
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    Magnetic are fine, but keep away from floppys. A lot easier to use as well.
    Bye

  9. #9
    Billy T
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    Hi JM

    The only issue with magnetic tipped screwdrivers is the intense static magnetic field emanating from the tip. This is a very small point-source and the field stregth is negligible at 2-3 cm from the tip.

    The main risk in using a magnetic screwdriver around computers is the possibility of affecting data on magnetic media including tapes, floppies and hard drives. Of the three, the hard drive is the least susceptible as you cannot get the screwdriver tip very close to the disk platters.

    There is zero risk to semiconductors, though some might exhibit "Hall-Effect" behaviour and malfunction when in a strong magnetic field. I am just speculating on this as I have never bothered to find out what semiconductor materials have these properties and it could require a quite different material to normal chips. I only make the comment because a variety of special effects are available from ordinary semiconductor devices, quite incidental to their primary use.

    As an example, early germanium transistors were light sensitive so they were coated with black paint to stop light interfering with their operation. Techs being techs, we would play tricks on apprentices servicing older mains powered transistor radios by scraping some of the paint off the audio preamplifier transistor then asking them to fix the hum. Working under fluorescent lights, this was an impossibility as the hum came direct from the light above their bench. Of course the radio was fine if you put the back on to keep the light out!]

    This was far more subtle than plumbers sending apprentices to the stores for a long weight, or carpenters sending them to another company to borrow their skyhook. In later years we did keep a brick in a cardboard box labelled "antimagnetic magnet" though, and sent new apprentices to get that to cure (specially created) purity errors on colour TVs. They were told to put it on top of the TV and when they got back from morning tea (or lunch) it would be OK. While they were away somebody would degauss the TV and cure the purity error.

    Next time they came across a purity error (again created for their benefit) they would go and get the box and leave it on top etc then wonder why it wasn't curing the problem. If they were particularly gullible you could repeat the exercise several times, accusing them of not positioning the box correctly on top of the set.

    Unfortunately you would never succeed with that sort of trick today as most kids would be too technologically aware to fall for it. Back then under full employment we often got apprentices who were not really suited to the work and it was an uphill battle to get them to adequate levels of competency.

    But I digress JM. No, you won't induce enough current to fry a chip.

    Cheers

    Billy 8-{)

  10. #10
    Peter H
    Guest

    Default Re: Magnetic or non-magnetic tip screwdriver

    In early days of broadcasting, a big banger, fuse wire round it's wick and connected after the mains switch on equipment racks. Always worked a treat and gave a big bang and plenty of smoke. Oh for the good old days !!
    Bye

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