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  1. #1

    Default Why drop the "ing"?

    Have noticed many people and organisations that are dropping the "ing" off the ends of words.

    For example: It used to be a camping ground. Now it's a campground.

    Our grandson goes to swimming lessons every week. In the area where he learns is the sign "Swim School."

    So why copy the Yanks (who have a version of English all their own) and drop the ing?

    Let's face it - you don't do "camp" at a campground, (unless you are a poufter) you do camping. And you don't do "swim" at swim school.

    Why not use Kiwi English and retain the ing instead of copying the Yanks who, let's face it, have no idea about correct English?
    It is better to wear out than to rust out.
    - Richard Chamberlain, Tour of the Hebrides

    Us husbands are a sorry lot.

  2. #2
    Ancient Member Blue Druid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Sadly it befalls us remaining bastions of the language to defend English as she is spoke.

    I wrote a birthday card to my grandson, using, as is my wont, cursive handwriting. He could not decipher it. When provided with a translation, he asked "What does that mean?" No doubt as a fine upstanding Pakeha lad, he is totally proficient in Te Reo.

    Is it any wonder that there is now a barrier of incomprehension between them and us?

    I'm sorry but you can't have your "ing" back

  3. #3
    Senior Member piroska's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roscoe View Post
    For example: It used to be a camping ground. Now it's a campground.

    Let's face it - you don't do "camp" at a campground, (unless you are a poufter) you do camping.
    https://www.lexico.com/definition/camp

    I always went to a camping ground to camp.


    verb
    [no object]

    1Live for a time in a tent, especially while on holiday.
    ‘holiday parks in which you can camp or stay in a chalet’

    1.1Lodge temporarily, especially in an inappropriate or uncomfortable place.
    Ex-pctek

  4. #4
    Retired old codger kenj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    The cross dresser went camping?

    Ken

  5. #5
    Apple free in Appleby KarameaDave's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Quote Originally Posted by kenj View Post
    The cross dresser went camping?

    Ken
    Cross? What about ?
    FTW

  6. #6

    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Quote Originally Posted by piroska View Post
    I always went to a camping ground to camp
    I said you don't do camp, you do camping, that's why it is a camping ground. Or in your case you go to camp. Two different things.
    It is better to wear out than to rust out.
    - Richard Chamberlain, Tour of the Hebrides

    Us husbands are a sorry lot.

  7. #7
    Senior Member 1101's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roscoe View Post
    Why not use Kiwi English and retain the ing instead of copying the Yanks who, let's face it, have no idea about correct English?
    Lets stop pretending UK English is some perfect un-bastardised language.

    The yanks have got it correct, stop being so precocious, remove the BS from our language . Accept the majority is correct .
    Adapt & move one.

    UK English is a mash up and bastardization of other languages.
    UK English evolves over time.
    UK English doesnt reflect whats actually spoken or written by the majority , just a minority of stuck up sticky beaks saying this is correct & that isnt

    "Word Origin
    noun early 16th cent.: from French camp, champ, from Italian campo, from Latin campus ‘level ground’, specifically applied to the Campus Martius in Rome, used for games, athletic practice, and military drill."

    Its NOT ENGLISH. Its FRENCH

    Last edited by 1101; 09-04-2021 at 10:13 AM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1101 View Post
    Lets stop pretending UK English is some perfect un-bastardised language.
    I was not talking about UK English, I was talking about Kiwi English, and if you have ever been to the UK you will realise that Kiwi English is quite different. It's the same with Yank English. If you've ever been to Yankee Land you will realise that the Yanks have their own particular brand of English which is quite different from Kiwi English.

    What I was saying is that we have our own particular brand of English, so why do we need to copy the Yanks when we have our own perfectly good version of English? It's our own identity.

    Why would we want to take on a Yankee - or anyone else's - identity? I've been to Yankee Land. They love the way we speak.
    It is better to wear out than to rust out.
    - Richard Chamberlain, Tour of the Hebrides

    Us husbands are a sorry lot.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    I support what you say Roscoe.
    However one 'new" probably copied word that really irritates me these days (particularly heard on radio or TVC interviews) is learnings. So many now use this instead of lessons.
    I thought we took lessons in order to learn matters. Another of my pet hates is "a nonsense" when plain nonsense or nonsensical should be used.
    I could be wrong but I have formed the impression that one TV interviewer uses a new version and others race to copy. like sheep.

  10. #10
    Senior Member piroska's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why drop the "ing"?

    English as it was and is now:

    1. Pretty
    This word is from Old English prættig, "cunning", from præt "trick" – unrelated to prat "idiot", which originally referred to the buttocks (hence pratfall: a fall onto the backside).

    By the 15th century, pretty described something cleverly made, artful or ingenious. This led to its use to describe someone attractive or good-looking – most commonly a woman or child.

    2. Tall
    Tall is from an Old English word that meant "swift" or "active". By the 15th century, it had come to mean "handsome" or "elegant". Its use to mean "skilful" gave rise to the expressions "tall of hand", meaning "handy" and "tall of tongue", meaning "good at arguing".

    The 16th century saw the emergence of uses relating to height; subsequent metaphorical extensions include "large", as in "tall order", and "exaggerated", from which the phrase "tall story" emerged.

    3. Silly
    Someone silly in Old English was "happy" or "fortunate", and later "pious" or "holy". Because the innocent are easily taken advantage of, it came to signal a person deemed "weak" or "helpless". Further negative associations are apparent from its use to mean "rustic" or "lacking sophistication", from which our modern sense of "foolish" emerged.

    4. Naughty
    In Old English, to be naughty was to be poor, literally "to have naught" or "nothing". It was later used to describe someone immoral and, in a weakened sense, mischievous or disobedient. The particular association with badly behaved children led to the "naughty corner" .

    5. Sad
    This word is from Old English sæd, which meant "full", as the German satt still does. In English, it has been replaced in this sense by "satisfied" or "sated", from Latin satis "enough".

    By the 14th century, sad meant "settled", "firm" or "resolute" and from this the senses "serious" and "grave" developed.

    The modern use of sad to mean "sorrowful" can be traced back to where the word already carried a sense of being weary or tired of something, reflecting the way that satisfaction quickly shades into ennui.

    Surprisingly, "happy" was brought to us by the Vikings who plundered the north of England and is borrowed from the Old Norse hapy". It originally meant "fortunate" .

    Simon Horobin, Professor of English Language and Literature, University of Oxford
    Ex-pctek

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