Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34
  1. #21
    Senior Member piroska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    With Kim-Jong-Mum
    Posts
    1,656

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    The preaching of the EV gospel has reached evangelical proportions. We are told to believe in EVs (electric vehicles), buy them at whatever cost, drive them and love them, or face damnation.

    Politicians advertise what they claim are the sparkling clean, green credentials of EVs.

    Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter, for example, plans to push through legislation this parliamentary term for her "feebate" scheme. This would impose further new taxes on people buying ordinary cars and hand the money to those buying new, expensive EVs. The goal is to speed up the conversion of New Zealand's 4 million-strong car fleet to EVs.

    READ MORE:
    The case for an EV future and tips on how to get there
    Mike Hosking: Govt's plan to get us into EVs is driven by blind ideology

    No one in authority seems to have stopped to ask just how environmentally friendly EVs are.

    In New Zealand at least, few have asked what we know about the supply chains of EV batteries, including the human-rights implications. As part of a decision to approve an investment in a company interested in technology for new hydrogen cars, I have. And the evidence is that EVs risk an environmental catastrophe in New Zealand, and a human-rights issue globally.

    I believe that when these supply chain issues are fully understood by the public, and misinformation about how clean and green EVs are is replaced with facts, Genter's "feebate" scheme will be seen for what is Labour and the Greens jumping on the EV bandwagon without properly considering the full impact, either upstream or downstream.

    The essential difference between ordinary cars and EVs is the latter's massive batteries.

    These are not the normal 12-volt batteries found in ordinary cars that can be recycled and present little, if any, risk to our environment or to global labour standards.
    Related articles:
    BUSINESS
    BNZ customers threaten to walk as online outage drags on
    6 Sep, 2019 6:03pm
    4 minutes to read
    BUSINESS
    Complex situation: But Fonterra results delay not too surprising
    6 Sep, 2019 5:43pm
    3 minutes to read

    To allow EVs to drive up to 500km on a single charge, these batteries are made out of lithium, cobalt, graphite and nickel mined in the world's poorest countries.

    After the EV battery loses its ability to hold a charge, its metals and chemicals contain toxic substances that are currently very difficult and expensive to dispose of cleanly. Technology hasn't developed enough globally to find a way to either dispose of them safely, nor to recycle them in the volumes we will need. The fear is that they will end up being dumped in landfills unless we seriously ramp up recycling plants on a mass scale.

    The average EV battery weighs over 500kg or half a tonne, is heavy in lithium and lasts a maximum of eight years. If Genter wants all New Zealand's 4 million vehicles to be EVs, she will first need to outline the plan to dispose of these millions of toxic used batteries.

    She will have her work cut out. Imagine a near-future where 4 million used EV batteries must be disposed of every eight years. That's more than 2 million tonnes of used toxic EV batteries in New Zealand alone.
    Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter. Photo / File
    Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter. Photo / File

    One option is to build giant specialist EV battery recycling plants, probably requiring vast government subsidies to establish. This option is completely untested so it cannot be relied upon. It certainly hasn't been promoted publicly by the EV lobby.

    Another option is to ship the toxic batteries to countries that make money from taking the developed world's rubbish. Not only would most New Zealanders regard this as morally unacceptable, but thousands of journeys by huge vessels would be required, with significant carbon costs.

    In reality, the only alternative is to bury them here in New Zealand.

    Huge areas of land would need to be converted to graveyards for toxic lithium batteries. Suddenly, the clean, green future with EVs that Genter advocates looks extremely dirty and hazardous to human and animal life.

    There is no information on how we are to stop these toxic chemicals seeping through the ground into our waterways. That's despite the fact that even tiny amounts can induce extreme nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, blurred vision and dizziness in animals and humans.

    In the meantime, used EV batteries are prone to spontaneous combustion, emitting poisonous gases into our air. The gases from the fires would travel large distances and be a huge risk to animals and humans. A recently published academic paper by Swedish scientists Fredrik Larsson and Petra Andersson concluded "fluoride gas emission from EV battery fires pose a serious toxic threat". They warned that not enough is known about the extreme danger from mass production of EV batteries.

    Compared with normal fires, EV fires will be very difficult to put out. Fire and Emergency New Zealand (FENZ) national manager Paul Turner recently warned of the risk to human life from EV battery fires. He reports that EV battery fires trigger an irreversible chain reaction called thermal runaway burning, with fires burning at 1000C. Fire and Emergency is warning of the risks with the influx of a few thousand more EVs, let alone the 4 million that Genter and her party want to bring into New Zealand.

    Many New Zealanders might prefer the vast amounts of lithium and cobalt used in EV batteries be left in the ground in the first place. Already with mobile phone battery production, lithium and cobalt are booming industries but ones to which we perhaps prefer to turn a blind eye. Lithium mining creates major water pollution, but perhaps even worse are the human rights abuses that come with it.

    Bolivia, for example, is the world's largest supplier of lithium but has one of the world's worst records for child labour, with children legally commencing full-time mining at the age 10.

    Even more horrifying are the human rights violations in the production of cobalt for EV batteries in the Congo, where more than half of the world's cobalt is mined. A CNN investigation tracked the cobalt used for the production of luxury EVs to Congolese child-labour camps, involving children as young as seven. Adult supervisors were filmed assaulting children for not following instructions. The mines are underground, not ventilated, and the children are breathing in the polluted air and being beaten if they don't follow orders. It is not known how many have been killed.

    If New Zealand is to import EVs on the enormous scale Genter is proposing, we need a well-informed public debate about the cost of EV battery production in terms of both the environment and human rights violations.

    Under the Guiding Principles of Human Rights published by the United Nations, all member states and their business communities have an obligation to ensure the supply chains of goods they import are free from child labour exploitation. If these principles are being followed by the Ardern Government when it comes to importing EVs, Genter owes it to us to explain how that can be reconciled with the horrors CNN uncovered in its investigation.

    If they are determined to go down the EV path, the Greens and the Labour-NZ First Coalition must urgently and seriously consider and clearly reveal to the public how they will address these very serious concerns regarding how to dispose of the dead EV batteries in an environmentally friendly manner and how to guarantee child labour is not being used in their production.

    These issues need to be addressed openly and transparently before even considering subsidising more EVs coming into our country. If the Coalition and the Greens cannot do that, we need not just reconsider plans for the radical increase in imports, but consider stopping them immediately. The road we are on risks us tacitly supporting child slave labour and threatens an environmental catastrophe which the experts are already warning about.

    Troy Bowker is executive chairman of Caniwi Capital Partners, which has a small part of its portfolio invested in Petroleum Equipment Services, a business which supplies infrastructure equipment to the petroleum industry. This business is actively supporting technology for the development of the hydrogen as an energy source.


    (on the NZHerald website)
    Ex-pctek

  2. #22
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Posts
    1

    Default Petrol stations needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Hi anyone or everyone on this forum.

    Have a question: is there a program
    included in UBCD that I can use to
    place, nearly, any program onto a SD
    or SDHC card to enable it to be run
    at bootup in Vista?

    Thank you from

    Mahjonng

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    496

    Default Re: Petrol stations needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Quote Originally Posted by PacNes View Post
    Hi anyone or everyone on this forum.

    Have a question: is there a program
    included in UBCD that I can use to
    place, nearly, any program onto a SD
    or SDHC card to enable it to be run
    at bootup in Vista?

    Thank you from

    Mahjonng
    Wait for it... (same question asked in 2013 computer forum by same member)
    Last edited by user; 01-10-2019 at 08:22 AM.

  4. #24
    Wanderer
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    7,394

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Now that Z Energy and Caltex has the new pumped programme it's essentially the same as the AA Smartfuel programme (BP and G.A.S). These are the better programmes. The Mobile Smiles programme isn't as generous. The best way is to accumulate the points, stick to one programme, usually on Wednesdays they have a 10c promo and plan for that, unless you do a lot of driving so you cannot. Me in Wellington, I go to the Old Hutt Road Caltex truckstop b/c they also accept the pumped card (AirNZ or Flybuys) so they compete with Waitomo but you also get the 6c or 10c accumulated.

    Re: the AA card, I don't do the countdown thing b/c now you have to spend quite a bit more than just $30 to get the 4c. I use the One Card to get specific item discount price thou but Pak N Save is usually cheaper anyway.

  5. #25
    amateur expert dugimodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    7,795

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Well as an EV owner I hate to add any more fuel to the anti EV sentiments but look up the $33k battery replacement story on youtube about one Aussie owners woes if you want something to put you off owning one.
    Essentially after 7 years and 89000 km his car is junk with Nissan quoting $33K to replace the battery. His only hope would be some 3rd party option should it become available - many are working on it around the world including here in NZ but so far there is still no affordable battery replacements.

    I think the herald article piroska posted is a bit biased but then I guess we all are to some extent. I believe plenty of people have looked at the numbers and the environmental impact of EVs vs petrol and concluded that EVs are worse to start with but better over time with the overall environmental impact over the life of the vehicle being better even in countries where the power supply is largely from fossil fuels.

    Unfortunately in cases like the poor guy in Aus his car will never be better than a petrol model due to the high buy in cost, high initial environmental impact, and short useful life of his vehicle with it being uneconomical to repair after such a low mileage.

    On the other hand here in NZ with our mild climate you can get a second hand leaf starting around $10-15K and as long as you check on the battery health and only want it for short commutes you should get several years of cheap commutes and low maintenance out of it. Hopefully. It's a gamble I've made, ask me in a couple years if it was a good one meanwhile I copped out and have a second petrol car as a back up.
    Ryzen 2700X, 16Gb DDR4RAM, 512GB M.2 NVME SSD, MSI GTX1070

  6. #26
    Senior Member 1101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,325

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    "If you own a 2011 to 2015 Nissan LEAF, replacing the battery will cost you exactly $5,499, plus installation"
    "Owners of 2011 and 2012 cars must also add $225 for a special adapter kit to retrofit the new battery to their cars."
    Even assuming thats US$ , its not too bad.

    Perhaps that Aus guy's Leaf wasnt a official Aus Nissan import, so Nissan Aus arnt going to officially support ? Perhaps ?


    and
    "The cost of a replacement reconditioned battery is $9K + $2K labour" . Aus $
    That $33K quote may have been a dodgy repair centre, rather than from Nissan itself.
    I think we arnt getting the full story with that one
    :-)

  7. #27
    Senior Member piroska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    With Kim-Jong-Mum
    Posts
    1,656

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Quote Originally Posted by dugimodo View Post
    Essentially after 7 years and 89000 km his car is junk with Nissan quoting $33K to replace the battery.

    On the other hand here in NZ with our mild climate you can get a second hand leaf starting around $10-15K and as long as you check on the battery health and only want it for short commutes .

    Yes, it's a joke. Batteries are not the answer.
    Short commutes are all very well but a lot don't do that. Certainly when we were down SOuth we didn't.

    and even in AUckland, my son couldn't be said to do short commutes, stuck in traffic for ages on the motorways. Lets see it, dead battery cars cluttering the motorway all over, what to do, have charging stations all along like they used to have those phones?

    And $15K is not cheap...not for low income people. Never mind the battery in one costing that....I used to by $3K cars, or less.
    Ex-pctek

  8. #28
    Senior Member 1101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,325

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Ah, there is more to the story of the 33K batt
    Nissan will replace the batt for 10K
    Owner doesnt want to pay, seems to think a car that old shouldn't have batt issues ( is he just that stupid )
    Lithium batts simply dont last that long. Period. End of story . We all know that .

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...2LTCvtozXqPVvY

    A Nissan spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia it was prepared to replace an existing battery, with eight bars or less of power with a new 24 kilowatt hour battery for $9,990 plus labour costs.

    'Nissan Australia has contacted Mr Carlson and are working directly with him to address his concerns,' she said.

    The unhappy owner said it was a Nissan design fault.

    'I have no intentions of replacing the battery because they haven't fixed the cause which is the battery overheats due to the lack of cooling,' he said.

  9. #29
    amateur expert dugimodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    7,795

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Where are those figures coming from 1101?

    NZ Nissan aren't interested in imports and may or may not sell you a battery if you have one like I do. Also the quoted replacement costs from the US were subsidised by Nissan and don't necessarily apply.
    The Aussie story included a photo of the invoice from a Nissan dealer, but I agree it seems crazy high so maybe you're right and there's more to it.

    What I was told by a local imported leaf dealer is that you are generally better off buying another leaf with better range currently. The options for an owner of an imported leaf with a degraded battery in NZ at present as I understand them are:
    1. Buy a second hand battery and hope it still has enough life in it - prob something like 4-6K or more (50% degraded modules sell for $100 or more and the car has 48 of them so $4800 is basically the lowest price)
    2. Get the battery refurbished by someone like Bluecars in Auckland - approaching the cost of a second hand leaf
    3. convince Nissan to sell you a new battery, apparently they've never done this and have quoted various prices some higher than $20K - total hearsay have no evidence
    4. trade it in on another car
    Ryzen 2700X, 16Gb DDR4RAM, 512GB M.2 NVME SSD, MSI GTX1070

  10. #30
    Senior Member 1101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    6,325

    Default Re: Petrol stations & needing airpoints or similar card to get discounts

    Quote Originally Posted by piroska View Post
    Yes, it's a joke. Batteries are not the answer.
    Short commutes are all very well but a lot don't do that. Certainly when we were down SOuth we didn't.
    and even in AUckland, my son couldn't be said to do short commutes, stuck in traffic for ages on the motorways. Lets see it, dead battery cars cluttering the motorway all over, what to do, have charging stations all along like they used to have those phones?
    And $15K is not cheap...not for low income people. Never mind the battery in one costing that....I used to by $3K cars, or less.
    People who buy electric cars dont truly care about costs , or about how long they last and what happens to them afterwards ,
    and dont care about the true impact of electric cars : in most countries that electricity comes from coal or nukes
    Its often just virtue signaling , buying a electric or hybrid & claiming they are saving the environment

    My previous car lasted 29 years before it was towed away for scrap. 29 years use is how you save the environment
    a $3K car would be luxury to me

Similar Threads

  1. Celebrate Christmas-Big discounts
    By Sportabcd in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-12-2010, 11:32 AM
  2. Airpoints
    By lakewoodlady in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 13-11-2010, 10:12 AM
  3. Onecard discounts often not as they seem
    By johnnyfrango in forum PC World Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-07-2009, 09:22 PM
  4. Newby needing Video Card
    By AndrewF in forum PressF1
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 21-09-2006, 10:55 AM
  5. Off topic: Air NZ new airpoints scheme.
    By nomad in forum PressF1
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-08-2004, 02:18 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •