Top of our test

Linksys EA8500
Score 70

Bottom line: This dual-band Linksys router has OK incoming fibre speeds. Outgoing WiFi speeds are very good on 2.4GHz and good on the 5GHz band. Obstructions were a minor challenge for this router making it a great choice if you have an old villa with thick walls.

Fritz!Box 7490
Score 68

Bottom line: This dual-band router supplied by 2degrees has very good incoming fibre speeds and OK VDSL speeds at 500m. Its outgoing WiFi 5GHz speeds are very good, while 2.4GHz speeds are OK. Where you place this router can be important - when obstructed, its 5GHz band suffered a 16% drop in speed, the largest in our test. It's easy to use, but the WAN port for connecting fibre isn't labelled, it's the fourth LAN port.

NetComm Wireless NF18ACV
Score 62

Bottom line: This dual-band router supplied by Orcon has good incoming fibre speeds and outgoing WiFi speeds are good on 2.4GHz and OK on the 5GHz band. Our obstruction tests were no trouble for this router, and our load test showed only a minor reduction in speeds. But incoming VDSL speeds at 500m are poor.

Netgear Orbi RBK40
Score 62

Bottom line: This dual-band Netgear router's outgoing WiFi speeds are good on 5GHz band and OK on the 2.4GHz band. But incoming fibre speeds are only just OK meaning youíre limited in what speeds can be output to devices. For light to moderate household use then this router will be fine Ė though donít expect to break any speed records.

NetComm Wireless NF4V
Score 60

Bottom line: This single-band router supplied by Slingshot and Flip has good incoming fibre and VDSL speeds at 500m. Its outgoing WiFi speeds on the 2.4GHz band is OK, but not quite a match for the incoming speeds. This router can slow down fibre speeds on plans with download speeds equal or greater than 100Mbps. And don't overload this router with too many devices, it suffered a 74% speed loss in our load testing.

Huawei HG659b
Score 59

Bottom line: This dual-band router supplied by Spark has good fibre incoming speeds and outgoing WiFi speeds are OK on the 5GHz band. But incoming speeds on VDSL speeds at 500m and outgoing on the 2.4GHz band were only just OK. Our obstruction tests were little trouble for this router, and our load test showed only a minor drop in speeds.

D-Link DSL-2885A
Score 58

Bottom line: This dual-band D-Link router has good incoming fibre and VDSL speeds at 500m. Outgoing WiFi speeds are good on the 2.4GHz network band, but only just OK on the 5GHz band. Its performance was comparable to the ISP-supplied routers. If you have a modern home with thin walls, and not too many devices, this is a good wallet-friendly option.

Huawei HG531s V1
Score 57

Bottom line: This single-band router supplied by Spark has good incoming ADSL speeds and outgoing WiFi speeds on the 2.4GHz band are OK. For such a small device, it dealt with our load test well with only a 46% drop in speeds, and it breezed through our obstruction test with no impact on speeds.

NetComm Wireless NF15ACV-TP
Score 53

Bottom line: This dual-band router supplied by Trustpower has OK fibre speeds and just OK incoming VDSL speeds at 500m. Outgoing WiFi speeds were OK on both the 2.4 and 5GHz bands and our obstruction box was no match for this router on either band. But we saw a moderate drop in speed when loading the router up with devices.

Huawei HG630b
Score 52

Bottom line: This single-band router supplied by Spark has very good incoming VDSL speeds at 500m. But the outgoing speeds on its single 2.4GHz band were just OK Ė it could only transmit 90% of the incoming VDSL speed. And don't overload this router with too many devices, it suffered a speed loss of 76% in our load testing.

NetComm Wireless NB604N
Score 52

Bottom line: This single-band router supplied by Slingshot, Orcon and Flip can only take an incoming ADSL connection, but its speeds are good at 200m and 500m. The outgoing 2.4GHz WiFi speeds are where its performance falls down, they're just OK. We saw a moderate drop in speed when loading the router up with devices.

There are 2 major factors that affect the speed your wireless router can achieve: the incoming connection and the outgoing WiFi. Incoming speed depends on your type of connection, how far away your roadside cabinet is, and plan limits.

Outgoing WiFi speed depends on the size of your home, if itís multi-storey, and interference. If your routerís outgoing WiFi speeds are slower than the incoming connection, then the router is throttling or slowing down your speeds.

Centre stage: Donít put your router out of sight in a cupboard. Placing it centrally in the house, out in the open, will help keep your speed high.

Flip the switch: Some common household appliances (such as microwaves) operate on the 2.4GHz network band, which can interfere with your WiFi. An easy fix is switching your devices (such as laptops or phones) to the 5GHz band network.

Change the channel: Both network bands operate on a range of channels. Changing to a less cluttered channel results in better reception and faster speeds. Most routers automatically do this, so we used our WiFi-congested office, which has more than a dozen wireless networks operating simultaneously, to test how good they are at it.