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aidanmaz
06-01-2009, 08:01 AM
If i have a P4 2.8Ghz HT with 3.2GBs RAM and a combined hard drive space of 293GB. Would i be better off using VMware's ESX3i server to split all that into virtual servers, or should i stick with one machine that does it all?

SolMiester
06-01-2009, 08:59 AM
that cpu doesnt have VT for virtualisation, so wont be very quick with multiple VM's.....

aidanmaz
06-01-2009, 09:11 AM
What i want to do is have a Domain, with domain controller (obviously), file storage, symantec endpoint protection, and maybe sql 2005. would i be better off using all my ram for one machine that does all that instead of Vm'ing all those roles

jwil1
06-01-2009, 10:20 AM
If you have an old 1GHz PIII or something, rig that up and run that as a file server with an external HD (some old mobos don't like internal HDs above 32GB).

This probably doesn't meet your other needs though but I've got a file server running on a 500MHz P3 and it works fine ;)

chiefnz
06-01-2009, 12:36 PM
If i have a P4 2.8Ghz HT with 3.2GBs RAM and a combined hard drive space of 293GB. Would i be better off using VMware's ESX3i server to split all that into virtual servers, or should i stick with one machine that does it all?

Even if you did run VM's on there you would only be able to do 2 virtual servers as you only have 2 logical CPU's to play with.

I have run 2 virtual servers on a similar spec'd box... and whilst the performance wasn't overwhelming it was enough for I wanted done.

I was running 1 VM as a domain controller and the 2nd was a file and print server... both VM's were Server 2003 R2 installs.

I would give it a go and see if it will serve the purpose you require.

BTW.. we've just installed Symantec End Point Protection on one of our servers and we've had quite a bit of trouble with SMC.exe hogging CPU time. You may want to consider something else.... there is quite a bit of reading on Google.

Hope that helps

SolMiester
06-01-2009, 03:22 PM
Just use SBS 2003, it has all those functions and mail to boot!...

johnd
06-01-2009, 08:06 PM
I can't really see the point of using virualization for different server functions when you are using the same NOS? Seems to me that virtualization comes into it's own when you are using different NOSs (but there may be something I am missing here?)

aidanmaz
07-01-2009, 06:41 AM
I can't really see the point of using virualization for different server functions when you are using the same NOS? Seems to me that virtualization comes into it's own when you are using different NOSs (but there may be something I am missing here?)

i dont quite follow..sorry. VMware Esx3i installs on a bare machine, its like a mini linux, with a 32MB footprint (apparently) and its free. Last night i installed Server 2003 R2, onto 2 virtual machines, a DC with 1GB RAM, and a File Server with 1.5GB RAM. As for SEP I have SEP 11 MR3, which isnt too bad for me, I decided just to use the unmanaged client, as the RAM requirements are a little high for the management server. To host for 5-6 users i think i have enough resources

chiefnz
07-01-2009, 11:58 AM
I can't really see the point of using virualization for different server functions when you are using the same NOS? Seems to me that virtualization comes into it's own when you are using different NOSs (but there may be something I am missing here?)

There are many benfits to using virtualisation... the front runner for this is reduced server hardware cost...

The ESX platform can handle multiple Virtual Server instances with ease provided the baseline hardware of the host server is sufficient.

For example we use HP DL380- G5 servers fitted with 4 quad core CPU's and a minimum of 32GB RAM. We run on average... 5 virtual servers on one physical G5 unit. Performance is excellent but things come into their own in respect to system/server management... every virtual server can be managed from 1 centralised management server through the Virtual Infrastructure Client. There are many other advantages such as backup, scalability and the ability to migrate VM's from one data centre to another and have it up and running in no time with minimal downtime.

There are many more aspects to Virtualisation... it is a brilliant piece of technology especially in an Enterprise environment.

Cheers,

aidanmaz
07-01-2009, 12:58 PM
Viirtualisation is also beneficial to junior admins like me, so we can practice and learn without having the physical servers all over the place. My dads old company virtualised everything, had 2 management servers and 4 virtual machines, (2 vms on each management server) I have no idea how much ram they had, but it was truckloads

I did try the VMing with on my machine with esx, but trying to use a domain controller and a fileserver at the same time, caused so much lag it wasnt funny. Only reason i wanted to virtualise as it makes me look more techy that i actually am. I might actually fork out the cash and get a REAL server, not that i need it, its cos i want it:)