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davidmmac
15-12-2008, 02:12 PM
Hi there,

If you watch a video in HD on a CRT monitor with the resolution at 1024 x 1028 is it actually in HD? or are you just watching a watered down version of the video?

Thanks

Speedy Gonzales
15-12-2008, 02:17 PM
No I think true HD is 1920*1080, or some monitors support 1650x1080, I think it is

So, what youre watching is probably nowhere near HD quality

davidmmac
15-12-2008, 02:24 PM
I don't think it's Full HD (it's the freeview HD test channel) and it's letter-boxed anyway. Is it possible that it's in HD but just letterboxed?

Speedy Gonzales
15-12-2008, 02:29 PM
Could be HD, but you wont see all of whatever. Since its the wrong resolution

SolMiester
15-12-2008, 02:47 PM
CRT monitors are analogue so of course it isnt HD!.....

CYaBro
15-12-2008, 03:01 PM
I don't think it's Full HD (it's the freeview HD test channel) and it's letter-boxed anyway. Is it possible that it's in HD but just letterboxed?

If it is the Freeview|HD test channel then it is in 720p I think.

As stated by others the CRT will be downscaling the 720p signal to your resolution.
Not HD but still a lot higher res than a DVD which are 720x576.

utopian201
15-12-2008, 04:23 PM
CRT monitors are analogue so of course it isnt HD!.....

Analog/Digital has nothing to do with it. I have a 22" CRT with a maximum resolution of 2048x1536 so it can display full HD. HD refers to the resolution; 'normal' HD is considered 1280x720. Full HD is considered 1920x1080.

So if your screen (regardless of technology) is capable of those resolutions, you'll be able to display them without having to scale down.
You must have a very unusual monitor if it displays a resolution of 1024x1028; it is certainly not a standard resolution.

So for 720, the lowest resolution you'll need is 1280x(anything larger than 720). So 1280x1024 will show the whole picture (with black bars at the top and bottom)

davidmmac
15-12-2008, 04:24 PM
So if I put my screen Resolution at 1280*720, It's (normal) HD?

utopian201
15-12-2008, 04:40 PM
So if I put my screen Resolution at 1280*720, It's (normal) HD?

Yes, you'll be able to show HD 720 content at 1:1, no scaling required. But I doubt your CRT will support 1280x720, it should be able to support 1280x1024 or 1280x960. The only widescreen CRT I'm aware of is the Sony FW900 which had a maximum resolution of 2304x1440

What screen do you have?

SolMiester
15-12-2008, 04:48 PM
Analog/Digital has nothing to do with it. I have a 22" CRT with a maximum resolution of 2048x1536 so it can display full HD. HD refers to the resolution; 'normal' HD is considered 1280x720. Full HD is considered 1920x1080.

So if your screen (regardless of technology) is capable of those resolutions, you'll be able to display them without having to scale down.
You must have a very unusual monitor if it displays a resolution of 1024x1028; it is certainly not a standard resolution.

So for 720, the lowest resolution you'll need is 1280x(anything larger than 720). So 1280x1024 will show the whole picture (with black bars at the top and bottom)

Quite right, I was thinking of HDCP, which of course his monitor wouldnt do....

davidmmac
15-12-2008, 04:51 PM
AOC, unsure of model. It's 17 inch. I can put it in 1280*720 but I have to change the monitor settings on the monitor (screen dimensions) so it ends up being letter-boxed. The graphics card is a ASUS nvidia Geforce 7600GS

davidmmac
16-12-2008, 02:21 PM
So am I right in saying that it's not the type of the screen that counts, it's the resolution it can display?

Speedy Gonzales
16-12-2008, 02:23 PM
I would say both

utopian201
16-12-2008, 03:40 PM
HD is concerned with resolution, not the type of screen, that is correct.

But be aware there are different types of LCD screens.

(copied from a previous post)
You can check which panel a certain screen has here:
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/panelsearch.htm

TN: Cheapest, narrow viewing angles and colour reproduction, low image processing lag. Apparently best for fast paced gaming, worst for image editing and professsional work where colour accuracy is important. TN panels can only display 262k colours natively and use dithering to display 16.7m.

*VA (MVA, PVA, S-PVA): Middle of the road, better viewing angles and colour reproduction, typically high image processing lag (can be as high as 64ms on some models!). Typically best black levels and contrast. Can display 16.7m colours but unfortunately (or fortunately if you're a design professional) most newer panels of this type are wide gamut, meaning sRGB images are oversaturated in non colour managed applications. Can suffer from slight horizontal contrast shift (like TN's vertical contrast shift, but not as obvious)

IPS (S-IPS, H-IPS): Most expensive technology, viewing angles and colour reproduction almost as good as (or even better than) that of a CRT, medium image processing (between 20-40ms). Almost all are wide gamut (which is a disadvantage, or an advantage depending on how you look at it). No contrast shift.

All panel types have similar response times so ghosting is not really a problem anymore. Although some panels use overdrive, so you get a 'negative' ghosting effect, depending on the background eg on the TN (viewsonic 22") I'm using now, there is a slight ghosting trail, which isn't noticable on my IPS screen. So in this instance, TN has worse ghosting than IPS, even though the TN has a "quicker" documented (5ms for TN, 6ms for IPS) response time.