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Xypher
05-12-2008, 11:21 AM
Where should I start once I leave highschool. I will be year 13 next year and I'm focusing mostly on computer studies and information processing(only computer classes). I'm not sure where I should go or do once I leave though. Anyone have any ideas?

jwil1
05-12-2008, 11:26 AM
Where in NZ (or otherwise) are you?

Xypher
05-12-2008, 11:41 AM
christchurch

DeSade
05-12-2008, 11:44 AM
Canterbury University
Computer Science 101
(least it was when I was there)

Bussani
05-12-2008, 11:45 AM
I'm in the Bay of Plenty and I took programming classes at the Polytech there. Even if you're not in the same area, you should be able to take the DIPICT level 5 diploma somewhere. Up from there is the BCS (Bachelor of Computing Systems) which I'm trying to finish up now, which will get you a degree in IT. The programming can get a bit stressful at that level, but if it's your thing I'm sure you'll be fine.

I forget how long it's meant to take if you do it all at full steam. 3 years? I've been at it a bit longer than that myself due to other things.

SolMiester
05-12-2008, 12:05 PM
Where should I start once I leave highschool. I will be year 13 next year and I'm focusing mostly on computer studies and information processing(only computer classes). I'm not sure where I should go or do once I leave though. Anyone have any ideas?

You want to be a programmer?, say goodbye to any social life!!

dyewitness
05-12-2008, 12:10 PM
In general, go for a BSc (or MSc) majoring in Computer Science.

Have a read through here to give you an idea:
http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/subjects/cosc/

And the Computer Science Department:
http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/

You should contact the Computer Science Department directly and ask for advise about course etc, explaining your focus on programming.

Once your on the course and say in your 2nd year, then you enquire about interships with local software development companies to gain some experience for your CV, and to supplement you qualifications.

pctek
05-12-2008, 12:33 PM
A friend of mine did her course at a Polytech and Datacom came to her final project presentation and hired her on the spot.

mabix
05-12-2008, 01:51 PM
You want to be a programmer?, say goodbye to any social life!!

Haha you can say that again. Never been able to push myself to do programming, it just seemed, too... boring.

Best of luck with your studies though :)

Chilling_Silence
05-12-2008, 01:57 PM
Any idea what you want to program when you're done?
There's lots of languages you can learn .. you could learn assembly, it might help with embedded systems. You could learn Java, and use it to write web-applications... you could learn C and write desktop apps..

Of course if you knew java then its not *just* web-only-apps, but you know what I mean ... the question is more asking if you have any aspirations as to what you want to do when you graduate :)

utopian201
05-12-2008, 04:13 PM
Any idea what you want to program when you're done?
There's lots of languages you can learn .. you could learn assembly, it might help with embedded systems. You could learn Java, and use it to write web-applications... you could learn C and write desktop apps..

Of course if you knew java then its not *just* web-only-apps, but you know what I mean ... the question is more asking if you have any aspirations as to what you want to do when you graduate :)

If you go to university, they don't really teach you a language to program in as such, its more how to think and design programs. You -do- learn C and java, but the language isn't the subject. At polytech, i think it is more language focussed.

I wouldn't choose a course based on what language they used, unless you had a specific reason for learning/not learning that language. It is the content of the course that matters; the language used is trivial, unless the point of the course is to teach you a programming language.

Bussani
05-12-2008, 04:40 PM
If you go to university, they don't really teach you a language to program in as such, its more how to think and design programs. You -do- learn C and java, but the language isn't the subject. At polytech, i think it is more language focussed.

I wouldn't choose a course based on what language they used, unless you had a specific reason for learning/not learning that language. It is the content of the course that matters; the language used is trivial, unless the point of the course is to teach you a programming language.

At the polytech I went to it was more theory centric than language centric. In fact, over the course of my study there I must have used every language under the sun, even Pascal in the early days.

Lately they seem to stick to Java and C+ or C#, but different tutors have different preferences.

andrew93
06-12-2008, 01:49 PM
I agree the language doesn't matter so much as the theory. To be successful you first need to know what you are doing, not just at a practical level but also at a conceptual level. Then either a) use a language that is in demand, or b) create an application that is in demand. Follow the money. The language might not be as exciting, but the pay is better.

pctek
06-12-2008, 04:23 PM
You want to be a programmer?, say goodbye to any social life!!.................Haha you can say that again.

Oh? My friend the programmer went through boyfriends like toilet paper, wasout nearly every 2nd or 3rd night and had a great time.

Later she did do a lot of overtime but at a base rate of $35 an hour plus DOUBLE time, plus on call base fee, she had loads of money to have a good time.

prefect
06-12-2008, 04:36 PM
Programmer too stressfull. I always wanted to be a Lumberjack.

johnd
06-12-2008, 08:18 PM
There's lots of languages you can learn .. you could learn assembly, ....

But I think the focus to start with is not in choosing languages but on learning the art and science of programming. You can choose what language or languages you want to focus on later.

However having said that c++ has got to have a mention (but not as a beginning language) since so many other languages have similarities.

Bussani
06-12-2008, 09:41 PM
But I think the focus to start with is not in choosing languages but on learning the art and science of programming. You can choose what language or languages you want to focus on later.

However having said that c++ has got to have a mention (but not as a beginning language) since so many other languages have similarities.

True. I think learning the theory is way more important, even something as simple as structure diagrams to wrap your head around the logic. Once you've got that sorted, switching between different languages is a lot easier.