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a helpless random
01-11-2008, 02:47 PM
Hi guys,
are the buzzers/beepers in a pc 12v? im meaning the ones that beep once when your pc starts up(NOT the ones soldered to the mobo, the ones in cases that connect to mobo) Thanks

ubergeek85
01-11-2008, 03:18 PM
Chuck a multimeter across one and find out.

Or do you mean the PC speaker?

a helpless random
01-11-2008, 03:30 PM
i dont have a multimeter... i mean the one that is 4 pin and plugs into where the front panel stuff plugs into. It usually beeps when pc starts up. Thanks

a helpless random
01-11-2008, 03:46 PM
yep i think it da speaker

jwil1
01-11-2008, 05:08 PM
5V? That's what the LEDs run off I think....

or 12V

linw
01-11-2008, 05:56 PM
Speakers don't run from DC voltage. They are fed from an alternating signal. What is the point of your enquiry?

feersumendjinn
01-11-2008, 07:47 PM
This help?

Typical speakers have an impedance of 4 ohms, but multiple speakers could be wired up in parallel (reducing impedance) or in series (increasing impedance) or a combination.

Power = voltage^2 / impedance.

Assume that for sound, the voltage is the RMS average output of a sine wave like signal. This is .707 times the peak voltage, so a 4 volt RMS ac source has voltage peaks of + and - 5.657 volts.



Watts per channel versus voltage:
0.25 watts = ( 1 volt )^2 / 4 ohms
1.00 watt = ( 2 volts)^2 / 4 ohms
4.00 watts = ( 4 volts)^2 / 4 ohms
16.00 watts = ( 8 volts)^2 / 4 ohms
64.00 watts = (16 volts)^2 / 4 ohms
100.00 watts = (20 volts)^2 / 4 ohms

Bangbug
02-11-2008, 05:12 PM
Speakers don't run from DC voltage. They are fed from an alternating signal. What is the point of your enquiry?

isn't it an alternating DC signal?
yes i'll go with that. AC usually refers to the same frequency.... but yup, the + nad - change too....
so alternating current and voltage. it's the best of both worlds. i'm going to go google speakers now! lol :P

Anywho. see if you can trace the power path from the back of the power box thingie. that should tell you what the various components are running at.

a helpless random
06-11-2008, 05:28 PM
ok. got no idea what that means. but i sorted it out anyway.

Agent_24
06-11-2008, 05:30 PM
It's a standard speaker like the kind you would find in a small transistor radio (in fact, exactly the same)