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View Full Version : Crowded network - Automatic or Manual IP's



supersi
16-10-2008, 09:22 AM
I have a Dynalink RTA 1025w router.
Recently my wife brought home another computer, so now we have the following hanging-off the network ....

1 x Vista PC - Wired connection
1 x Apple Mac Mini - Wired connection
1 x PABT Box (VOIP) - Wired connection
1 x Mediagate (streaming media device) - Wireless
1 x PC Laptop - Wireless
1 x iPhone - Wireless

Every time I bring my Vista PC out of sleep I have to disable then re-enable the NIC to get connected. Rather than rush out and buy a gruntier router/modem I want to try manually assigning an IP to each device. However there are a couple of issues.

1. The Mediagate device. Although it offers manual configuration it doesn't like it and won't connect. So I might leave that to automatically obtain it's IP.

2. If the routers default gateway is 192.168.1.1 and the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. What should the preferred & alternate DNS be?

pctek
16-10-2008, 09:28 AM
Why not just disbale sleep on the NIC in Device Manager. Or shut the PC down rather than use sleep.

You have too many devices.

supersi
16-10-2008, 09:41 AM
Sleep is already disabled on the NIC. I'm constantly on and off the PC. So shut-down is a time-consuming pain in the arse compared to waking the PC from sleep.
If I manually assign IP's it should stop different devices from fighting for IP's being dished-out by the router. right?

nofam
16-10-2008, 09:57 AM
As a rule, any 'server' devices should always have a static IP - in your case, your VoIP & Mediagate devices probably should.

The other 'clients' on your LAN should work fine under DHCP - just make sure the DHCP scope on your router is set to exclude the address you're going to assign to those devices; i.e. if your router is 192.168.1.1, assign 192.168.1.2 to your VoIP device, and 192.168.1.3 to your mediagate. Then set your DHCP scope to the range of 192.168.1.10 - 192.168.1.254 etc.

Your primary & secondary DNS server IP's should be available from your ISP.

Regarding your Mediagate not liking static IP's, is there a firmware update available?

wainuitech
16-10-2008, 10:03 AM
It will stop devices fighting to a degree - but then it can also cause clashes.

lets say you assign an IP address of 192.168.1.8 to a device, when the device starts up IT tells the router it wants that Address #8 All good so far, when some other device wants an IP address if the router is issuing them (like Now) it will know #8 is already in use so it issues a different one.

BUT if that device is turned off that has the static IP of #8, the router may issue that number to another device if its "obtain automatically" - so when the original device starts up wanting #8 -- ERRRRRRRor - IP conflict.

Generally speaking - and this is no set rule, but most routers issue lower number IP address's to Obtain automatically. So with that in mind I always set a static IP above 100 ( assuming the router is capable of the full range 2-254,routers generally have 255 or 1 as the routers IP)

Here I have my servers set to static they use 200 & 201 and my play one 250 My own PC has a static of 107, workshop PC's have obtain automatically. As do any customers PC's that I plug into the LAN to get internet access.

supersi
16-10-2008, 10:07 AM
So I can use 2-254 for the IP in the last grouping bracketed.
eg 192.168.1.(252)

wainuitech
16-10-2008, 10:20 AM
So I can use 2-254 for the IP in the last grouping bracketed.
eg 192.168.1.(252) You got it :thumbs: as long as the router will issue the full range shouldn't be a problem. Looking back on the first post the router is 192.168.1.1 so 1 is already used - 254 left :) Best advice is do one device ( or Node as a network Device is called) at a time.

Sometimes I find they dont like having a "Set" number you decide, so if that's the case I set to obtain automatically, find out what the router has issued, and working and set it to that as static.

SolMiester
16-10-2008, 10:54 AM
You are going to change your network config due to an issue with the Vista PC?....

Why dont you fix the issue with the Vista PC?

1 suggestion would be to stop the PC going to sleep using the power management function, test how that works for awhile....

supersi
16-10-2008, 10:56 AM
Ok, I found a 'reserved IP address' option under DHCP tools on my router.
I'm going to input reserved IP's for each wired device & the MediaGate (no updates available from manufacturer by the way) based on current IP's assigned. See how that goes.

supersi
16-10-2008, 11:03 AM
Solmeister. If you read from the start of the post you might see I've already tried that. On the other hand, Wainuitech did this and has given a considered and very helpful response rather than second-guessing.

SolMiester
16-10-2008, 11:21 AM
Solmeister. If you read from the start of the post you might see I've already tried that. On the other hand, Wainuitech did this and has given a considered and very helpful response rather than second-guessing.

Excuse me, no where in your post did you say you had disable the PC from going to sleep!, the NIC yes, but not the PC....

While you are reserving IP addresses, you might like to reserve all the address for the devices period, which will be the same as static addressing..

supersi
16-10-2008, 12:00 PM
All sorted. Each device has a reserved ip now. No issues with reconnecting from sleep on any of the devices.

stormdragon
16-10-2008, 12:24 PM
assuming the router is capable of the full range 2-254,routers generally have 255 or 1 as the routers IP)

With a typical class C network (address starts with 192-224) and a /24 subnet mask, generally 1 is the network address and 255 the broadcast address.

wainuitech
16-10-2008, 12:46 PM
With a typical class C network (address starts with 192-224) and a /24 subnet mask, generally 1 is the network address and 255 the broadcast address.
When you set static though you can set to what you want - I have one workshop PC that insists on having 109, it's set to Obtain Automatically no matter what workstation I have it connected to, the Mrs PC is set to 50 and my sons set to 51, yet my laptop even though its set to Auto, will always get an address of between 10-40.
All sorted. Each device has a reserved ip now. No issues with reconnecting from sleep on any of the devices Great --- all nice when a network runs as its meant to.:)

stormdragon
16-10-2008, 01:17 PM
I realise what static assignments do. What I was attempting to explain is that the first address is the Routers Network address and last is the Broadcast.

wainuitech
16-10-2008, 01:44 PM
Thats cool :thumbs: fully agree

dyewitness
16-10-2008, 02:36 PM
Just adding my 2c:

- 6 machines on a network (let alone a subnet) is hardly "too many devices"

- fairly common practice to have a fixed set of addresses (as other mentioned for servers etc) and allocate a dynamic portion too.

- I would guess that's a standard feature for dhcp servers to allow for this type of configuration

Renmoo
16-10-2008, 02:59 PM
DNS Address: If you don't know what's yours, you can use OpenDNS's

Primary: 208.67.222.222
Secondary: 208.67.220.220

Cheers :)

Chilling_Silence
17-10-2008, 02:13 PM
+1 for OpenDNS

We have approx 25 devices on our home network here at any given time...

Would love to switch to an Apple Airport Express network, but that'd limit me to 10 devices, what a pain :(