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View Full Version : Misleading in Marketing Drives



nzwaikato
25-06-2008, 04:24 PM
Even though I understand the reasons why my 320GB hard drive only shows up as 298 GB on the computer (because 1 GB = 1,073,741,824 bytes or something like that). I can't help but feel a bit miffed about it.

If a company is going to advertise a storage medium as having 320GB the joe blogs user would expect to have 320GB of space to use. Maybe it should come with a warning label for those of us who aren't up to date on the technical reasonings. Or maybe they should just advertise them as 298GB and save us all the confusion. :)

beeswax34
25-06-2008, 05:17 PM
It says on the packaging that this will happen. It did when I bought my external HDD. There usually are notices and warnings telling you that the way the manufacturers measure capacity and the way your OS does is different.

jwil1
25-06-2008, 05:40 PM
As a side note, you can calculate the actual capacity by using this formula:

Marketed Size in GB / 1.024 / 1.024 / 1.024

nzwaikato
25-06-2008, 07:16 PM
Ah now that I think about it, the sales staff cut the drive out the packaging when I brought it (was travelling so didn't need the extra bulk). Thanks for the response

pctek
25-06-2008, 08:31 PM
Sigh............it doesn't. Open Windows Explorer. Right click on the drive letter and choose properties.
Now take a look at the size reported on the far left. See??????

Burnzee
25-06-2008, 11:58 PM
Hi

At first look, this does appear to be some slick marketing from the Manufacturers of Computer Hard Drives and RAM.

The real reason however, is not one of technical difficulty but rather that of Mathematics. Binary, to be precise. At the risk of boring the hell out of yah, Computers work like a switch. Either, the electronic logic is on or off. In Binary, this is represented by the digits 1 or 0. The value of each doubles in size so the series are 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 512, 1024 and so on. Some of these numbers will be familiar to anybody who uses modern electronic (digital) gear. How about 512 MB of RAM, or maybe a 512 MB Mp3 Player?

Still with me, great!! Remember,

1024 byte = 1kB
1024 kB = 1MB
1024 MB = 1 GB

1GB = 1024^3
=1024 x 1024 x 1024
= 1073741824 byte

I applaud the Manufacturers who explain the differences on their packaging, long may it continue.


BURNZEE

Sweep
26-06-2008, 12:17 AM
And if you buy this antiwrinkle cream it will make you look younger in two weeks. I should have got some earlier.

dugimodo
26-06-2008, 11:08 AM
Thanks for the maths Burzee, I'm sure a lot of us already knew that but for those less familiar I would just like to point out that while you showed the maths for actual GB you forgot to mention the maths of how the marketing companies work it out.

They use the decimal version of MB and GB which is simply 1,000,000 and 1,000,000,000. it's easy to see why this works out to a bigger number with each MB & GB being smaller than the binary version windows uses. However as crooked as it may be to deliberately use the wrong method to get a bigger sounding capacity, they are using a valid definition which is why they get away with it.

There were people a while back pushing for the two standards to have different abbreviations to distinguih them, which is why you'll sometimes see MiB & GiB which was a propsed way of showing the difference

robbyp
26-06-2008, 11:43 AM
Even though I understand the reasons why my 320GB hard drive only shows up as 298 GB on the computer (because 1 GB = 1,073,741,824 bytes or something like that). I can't help but feel a bit miffed about it.

If a company is going to advertise a storage medium as having 320GB the joe blogs user would expect to have 320GB of space to use. Maybe it should come with a warning label for those of us who aren't up to date on the technical reasonings. Or maybe they should just advertise them as 298GB and save us all the confusion. :)

Ii think it is worse with things such as ipods. They stich 30Gb on the back of the ipod, but it is only about 27GB. Sure the have warnings about this, but I would have thought it would be better to advertsie it as having less than it actually has.

feersumendjinn
26-06-2008, 12:41 PM
For goodness' sake, get over it!

Graham L
26-06-2008, 03:46 PM
Regardless of the number base being used, disk manufacturers are selling disk drives. They aren't responsible for the OSs.

The way an OS file system is organised determines how much space you get to use.

IBM (who made the first computer hard disk drives) had a nice compromise MB definition to keep all parties happy. 1 kB = 1024B. 1MB = 1000 kB. :D The 3.5" floppies which Microsoft now say contain 1.37 MB (MiB) have "always" been known as 1.44 MB (2880 512 byte sectors in MS standard format). And for the grouchies, IBM sold them marked as "2MB", which is the actual "raw" capacity, before formatting and initialising of the file system . (Floppies have a bit of wasted space in each track to allow for different spindle speeds on different drives. MS distribution floppies sometimes used some of that space in a special format, giving about 1.7MiB).

sroby
27-06-2008, 08:30 AM
I agree fully. You should demand a refund of 2.4%(is my math correct??)
Next thing potato chip makers will be put one less chip in the bag just to rip us off. I often weigh & count my potato chips as that extra missing chip is
important to me.
And when my change gets rounded down to the nearest 10c, who gets that
3c I just lost. It should go into a fund for an expedition to find the missing Mb's
Just my 1.024c:2cents: :2cents: