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View Full Version : How long should a motherboard last for?



mntbkrnzl
22-05-2008, 06:12 PM
I have an 18month old Acer Aspire 5102 that has been diagnosed with a faulty motherboard.

Acer want to charge me $499 for it to be replaced!

Now to me only getting 18months of minimal use out of a laptop before having a major component fail is just no acceptable.

So just how long should a motherboard last for?

wratterus
22-05-2008, 06:34 PM
Welcome to PressF1.

The motherboard should be expected to last as long as the warranty - that way you will never feel let down as the product didn't meet your expectations.


Acer use crap components in their machines - I'm not surprised.

In saying that though, sometimes hardware can fail for no reason - happens to the best of hardware at the best of times, I have seen 5+ Dead Acers this year, and not a single Asus.

Next time get an Asus, or an HP or Dell with an extended warranty.

Sweep
22-05-2008, 06:34 PM
A good question but I have no real answer.

I have had motherboards that are dead on arrival and get returned and replaced no charge.

I had one that did not survive a lightning strike.

I had one one that fell victim to capacitator failure but it went quite happily for about two years.

On the other hand I can mention others that still work after more than eight years.

Probably Acer are within their rights if you are out of warranty.

Of course we do not know if your mate dropped the Laptop on the floor by accident or any other circumstances of use or misuse.

This is why I can not give you a definitive answer.

rumpty
22-05-2008, 06:35 PM
Maybe eight to ten years if it doesn't have any "hot spots".

Sweep
22-05-2008, 06:37 PM
Snap Wratterus!

Do Ascent build Laptops?

wratterus
22-05-2008, 06:40 PM
Aahhhhaa, beatcha! ;)

I misread the original post, thought it was a desktop. Edited my post accordingly. :)

mntbkrnzl
22-05-2008, 06:42 PM
Of course we do not know if your mate dropped the Laptop on the floor by accident or any other circumstances of use or misuse.


The laptop in question has never been dropped and has always been used on a Chillpad and anytime it has travelled anywhere it has been in a rather expensive Case Logic laptop bag.

It has actually had very little use which makes me all the more peeved that the motherboard has died.

wainuitech
22-05-2008, 06:58 PM
As mentioned above, components can and do fail at any time.

I have supplied customers with laptops that have lasted well past the standard warranty - my own laptop is coming up to 5 years old - never missed a beat, Its an Acer - yet others, and it doesn't matter what brand have failed within the first week.
If under warranty its replaced / repaired, if Not with todays prices its almost a case if out of warranty - buy a new one esp if its a motherboard.

I have a customers HP Laptop in the workshop at the moment, doing a reinstall of it, the original started having problems when it was 11 months old - I advised to get it seen to by HP NOW! - he did and they replaced the motherboard right away. That was 3 months ago - so now its out of warranty.

It's mentioned that its never been mistreated - I know of a person who brought 2 Laptops from one of the toaster shops Noel Leeming I think, kept one in the box, on his workshop shelf for near 7 months before opening it - it failed a month later - warranties run from the date of purchase.

To quote HP once - the warranty is for 365 days on day 366 - warranties over.

robbyp
22-05-2008, 07:45 PM
The laptop in question has never been dropped and has always been used on a Chillpad and anytime it has travelled anywhere it has been in a rather expensive Case Logic laptop bag.

It has actually had very little use which makes me all the more peeved that the motherboard has died.

Is it a personal laptop (eg. not purchased by a business), because if it is, you can get it fixed for free under the CGA. If the manufacturer are telling you otherwise, take it back to the retailer to sort out. I would expect a laptop to last a bare minimum of 3 years.

If it is a business one, you are probably out of luck, although you are still protected by the Sale of goods act.

mntbkrnzl
22-05-2008, 09:32 PM
Is it a personal laptop (eg. not purchased by a business), because if it is, you can get it fixed for free under the CGA. If the manufacturer are telling you otherwise, take it back to the retailer to sort out. I would expect a laptop to last a bare minimum of 3 years.

If it is a business one, you are probably out of luck, although you are still protected by the Sale of goods act.

Yes it is a personal one and that's what I thought as well re the CGA. I have unfortunately not being able to find anything on-line to back that train of thought up though. If you know of any URL's that would be worth-while checking I would appreciate you posting them for me. :thumbs:

Guess I will make a visit to DSE tomorrow and see what they have to say.

Thebananamonkey
22-05-2008, 10:17 PM
Yes it is a personal one and that's what I thought as well re the CGA. I have unfortunately not being able to find anything on-line to back that train of thought up though. If you know of any URL's that would be worth-while checking I would appreciate you posting them for me. :thumbs:

Guess I will make a visit to DSE tomorrow and see what they have to say.

CGA says "a reasonable period of time"... so how long is your piece of string? My lappy's 5 years old and goes ok, some much older ones do too. I can't see you winning this one with the CGA though, especially if it's out of warranty. Just being realistic sorry.

mntbkrnzl
22-05-2008, 10:51 PM
CGA says "a reasonable period of time"... so how long is your piece of string? My lappy's 5 years old and goes ok, some much older ones do too. I can't see you winning this one with the CGA though, especially if it's out of warranty. Just being realistic sorry.

So you feel that that a laptop that cost over $1600, is 18 months old, has had hardly any use and has never been dropped or abused and now has a dead motherboard is acceptable?

And the CGA, from my understanding, is designed to protect consumers from substandard products regardless of the manufacturers warrenty.

wainuitech
22-05-2008, 11:16 PM
Usually the consumer people take each case by case, there is no "its this and thats it" so to speak.

Bit like the old saying " Built on a Friday" - ALL electronic components will fail at some time, its just a matter of when is that time.

As its been mentioned, electronic parts can be faulty from day 1 or last for years.

kersonan
23-05-2008, 09:01 AM
I have a laptop...
made by a company called Digital
runs windows 95 and is quite possibly 10years old or more.

Battery died years ago but it still runs quite happily when its fished out of its bag, and its power supply is connected.

So yeah motherboards can last for a long time.

PaulD
23-05-2008, 10:22 AM
Yes it is a personal one and that's what I thought as well re the CGA. I have unfortunately not being able to find anything on-line to back that train of thought up though. If you know of any URL's that would be worth-while checking I would appreciate you posting them for me. :thumbs:

Guess I will make a visit to DSE tomorrow and see what they have to say.

Consumer NZ's view on computer life is
"Economic life: 3-7 years.
Life expectancy: 5 years (but if you keep up with software releases, your computer may be obsolete much sooner)."

What failed on the motherboard? Can you find any history of similar faults? If lots of that model are failing you may have a stronger case.

pctek
23-05-2008, 10:39 AM
I have an 18month old Acer Aspire 5102 that has been diagnosed with a faulty motherboard.


All depends on the brand.
Acer tend to use ECS motherboards. 18 months is a long time for one of them, I've seen dead ones at 6 months.

You get what you pay for.

utopian201
23-05-2008, 10:50 AM
Several manufacturers make all the world's notebooks. Quanta is the largest, but Acer notebooks are produced by Quanta, Compal and Wistron. These 3 also produce notebooks for HP, Dell and Lenovo.

Apple iBooks and Sony VIAO are made by Asus. Quanta also make the MacBook Air

This is not an exhaustive list.

JJJJJ
23-05-2008, 11:19 AM
How long is a piece of string?

mntbkrnzl
23-05-2008, 11:44 AM
Consumer NZ's view on computer life is
"Economic life: 3-7 years.
Life expectancy: 5 years (but if you keep up with software releases, your computer may be obsolete much sooner)."

What failed on the motherboard? Can you find any history of similar faults? If lots of that model are failing you may have a stronger case.

Thank you for the Consumer NZ view on life expectancy - that certainly helps my case.

As to what has actually failed on the motherboard I have no idea but I have been able to find a history of faults with this particular model and the motherboard in them failing - here is but one site :

http://www.daniweb.com/forums/post572193.html

Murray P
23-05-2008, 12:06 PM
CGA says "a reasonable period of time"... so how long is your piece of string? My lappy's 5 years old and goes ok, some much older ones do too. I can't see you winning this one with the CGA though, especially if it's out of warranty. Just being realistic sorry.


The warranty period is only relevant to the warranty period, not the CGA. If it were relevant. then it would be possible to contract out of the law (i.e. the CGA in this instance, via the warranty clauses), which it isn't.

In actual fact, many faulty goods claims have been upheld that occurred outside the warranty period.

The questions that need to be asked is:

a) Is it fit for purpose,

b) Does the period of use fall in to the reasonable expectation of a consumer (note consumer, not a manufacturer or retailer, a repair person, etc) or does/did it fall short.

Other points of interest could be misleading advice or advertising and misrepresentation, though I believe they fall more under fair trading, there's never any harm in having or indeed utilising multiple methods to skin your moggy.

It is also irrelevant what sort of quality reputation the brand has, or more accurately somewhat irrelevant depending if that reputation is well known to the average man/woman in the street (that excludes techs) and the product price reflects that, i.e. caveat emptor still applies.


Go get em.

pctek
23-05-2008, 12:16 PM
Quanta, Compal and Wistron. These 3 also produce notebooks for HP, Dell and Lenovo.

Apple iBooks and Sony VIAO are made by Asus. Quanta also make the MacBook Air



Clevo makes the Sager NP9262, the Alienware Area 51, the Voodoo Envy, the Hypersonic Aero .
Compal makes some of the the DELL, Hewlett Packard and Compaqs.

Quanta makes many of the Dell Latitude and Lenovo (IBM laptops.

Asustek currently has notebook orders from Apple computer, Sony, Samsung Electronics and JVC. They also make their own.

Trev
23-05-2008, 12:21 PM
Here is the CGA Site, by the way is law.
http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/consumerinfo/cga/index.html
Here is another site you might need. Disputes Tribunal.
http://justice.org.nz/tribunals/disputes_tribunals.html
:)

Murray P
23-05-2008, 12:29 PM
To clarify what I said above re warranty periods. The period is, more often than not, considered a minimum, not a maximum life expectancy.

wainuitech
23-05-2008, 02:30 PM
The questions that need to be asked is:

a) Is it fit for purpose,

b) Does the period of use fall in to the reasonable expectation of a consumer (note consumer, not a manufacturer or retailer, a repair person, etc) or does/did it fall short.The highlighted section is wide open to an argument / Difference, what is a reasonable expectation to one person is completely different to some one else.

Heres an example, being a tech my self I KNOW that PC components can and do fail on a regular basis, so how long would I expect a MD to last - maybe 2-3 years - NOW if some one else who has a different view, they may say 7-10 years.

Murray P
23-05-2008, 02:43 PM
As I said, "note consumer, not a manufacturer or retailer, a repair person, etc". Trades or experts in the field do not fall within the definition the average consumer. It is not a technical question, nor is the answer.

There are guidelines of what the expectation could be out there (see Consumer). In the event of a (more formal) dispute, what it often comes down to is the perception of whoever is chairing the hearing.

Mostly it boils down to common sense,for example: if you spent $1000-$5000 on a non-perishable product, is 18 months a reasonable life expectation? Most people would say quite emphatically no.

I suggest it matters little if the product has shonky parts or well made parts, it's the end use and how it functions that matters. In fact, if a product has cheap parts but functions perfectly well for a good period of time, that's an excellent product in my view.


BTW, excuse my ignorance, but what is an MD, apart from my first two initials?

wainuitech
23-05-2008, 03:33 PM
One thing with computers and time expectations and this will always be point, is a Desktop PC I would expect to last longer than A laptop.

By their very nature, a laptop is less likely to last as long as a desktop PC, any electronic device that is subjected to bumps, banging around will fail quicker.

laptops = Portable, shorter life.

Desktops = usually don't get moved about that much. I get a few calls from customers who say the PC (desktop) was working fine, it got moved to their new house and now wont go - damaged in moving about.


excuse my ignorance, but what is an MD, apart from my first two initials Sorry my typo, should have been MB = Motherboard

Murray P
23-05-2008, 03:43 PM
Ahhh! Cheers for that, I hate to be so uncool as to be not up with the latest acronyms.


Re the shorter lappy life. Yeah, I think that is a reasonable expectation, most people should know that, or at least consider it (which isn't quite the same as they do). By the same token, a lappy touted as a desktop replacement, should in theory, approach the same sort of life expectation as a desktop, as long as you're not expecting to lug it around too much.

How about gaming PCs, should one expect it to take the move from lan party to lan party and back home again? If it has a handle and wheels, I'd think you might have a strong claim, because they, the manufacturer, are actually encouraging you to move it around. Disclaimers in the fine print regarding transport probably will not save them in a claim in that case. Hence my remarks about fit for purpose and misrepresentation.

wainuitech
23-05-2008, 04:29 PM
:thumbs: That what I was thinking / meaning, when you mention gaming / Lan Party PC's - While they are a desktop,with some of the hardware in some of them they are not exactly the lightest to carry far, maybe from the house to car.

Some customers PC's with 2 or 3 more drives, and god knows what else are damn heavy. Get some strange looks sometimes walking through the middle of wellington with a Desktop PC and usually a load of software/ boxes under arms .:waughh:

linw
23-05-2008, 05:11 PM
OP, go for them. Read the CGA and listen to Murray. There is no way a reasonable consumer would say 18 months is fair and reasonable life. The retailer/manufacturer is having you on.

Good luck.

pctek
23-05-2008, 05:16 PM
One thing with computers and time expectations and this will always be point, is a Desktop PC I would expect to last longer than A laptop.

Yes.
And laptop parts are fragile. Take a look at the DVD for instance, open the tray and the entire guts comes with it.

As for what you spend on the PC, MurrayP, thats irrelevant.
PCs are known to be obsolete in 5 minutes, makes no difference if you paid $5000 for it.

3 years is a reasonable time for a motherboard, after 3 years a lot of people won't care because they'll be getting another.

Its why I tell people brand of the PARTS matters, not the label on the outside of the case.

I've seen ASUS boards 9 years old and still happily going.

Murray P
23-05-2008, 05:51 PM
Yes.
And laptop parts are fragile. Take a look at the DVD for instance, open the tray and the entire guts comes with it.

As for what you spend on the PC, MurrayP, thats irrelevant.
PCs are known to be obsolete in 5 minutes, makes no difference if you paid $5000 for it.

3 years is a reasonable time for a motherboard, after 3 years a lot of people won't care because they'll be getting another.

Its why I tell people brand of the PARTS matters, not the label on the outside of the case.

I've seen ASUS boards 9 years old and still happily going.


Pctek, I beg to differ.

The economic obsolescence, or ,marked drop in price as soon as an item leaves a store, has no relevance, that's an entirely different function to life expectancy and value for money, i.e. If the item did not retain some significant value (as opposed to price) to the purchaser then there would be no point in expectations of longevity (life expectancy).

We do however expect to get value for money and more often than not, that value is derived from a combination of function, brand image, look & feel (image) and build quality (or reputation for same) and, part of the quality will be a perception of how long a particular item should last. Some peoples perceptions of those factors will even be influenced by price - the more they pay the better it must be therefore the more satisfied they will be (never charge too little for your time/services, it cheapens the service you provide and can even effect payment/debt.).

As an aside. The drop in price is not unique to computers, it occurs to most consumer goods, be they electronics, white ware, vehicles, clothing, etc, etc. That factor is a reflection of an items desirability in an economic sense, not it's usefulness or value to the purchaser.

Of course some items will have a higher 2nd hand price than others, but those items will generally still be in ratio with their original cost. Exceptions occur with high value items that are scarce and desirable; a McLaren F1 sports car for e.g. Remembering that value is often subjective, even if widely accepted.

Murray P
23-05-2008, 05:54 PM
BTW, I'm a big fan of Asus boards through reputation and personal experience. I'd be highly pissed off if one failed on me prematurely.

Brassed Off
26-05-2008, 09:33 AM
Sale of Goods Act I recall says they should be suitable for purpose designed for etc. And be of reasonable standards to last. If you ask for it to be suitable to last for say three years and it is no good after eighteen months then retailer has mislead you. I have a brother who also had no end of problem with Acre computer and spent the first half of warranty period going back and forwards to Dick Smith. Final outshot he managed to get his money back.
Anyway here is a link for a couple of sites to check out.
http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/
http://www.comcom.govt.nz/
Hope they can help out.
We had problem with Fisher and Paykel Dishwasher. [Elba.] They dont supply a warranty and never came with vital parts to install and Fisher and Paykel service or lack of it waiting 3 weeks for parts and never arriving so took it back to retailer in the end to get a replacement of differnt make.
Forgot to metion I got a Asus Motherboard and only lasted for about 10 minutes and had to send it back for replacement and they failed to replace and took 4 months to get money back. Keep away from that brand is my recomendation.

pctek
26-05-2008, 09:39 AM
The drop in price is not unique to computers, it occurs to most consumer goods, be they electronics, white ware, vehicles, clothing, etc, etc.

But nothing depreciates as fast as computers.

mntbkrnzl
11-06-2008, 12:41 AM
Well time to close this thread off with the news that Acer NZ came to the party and replaced the motherboard free of charge despite the fact my lappy was out of its warranty so good on yah Acer NZ - you have restored my faith.

williamF
11-06-2008, 01:02 AM
hehe i've got some reeeeeeaal oldies, i got a toshiba satellite 2110(killed the screen unfortunatly) 486 running 95, a toshy satellite 420 (pentium running 98SE) and a compaq armada 1750 running 98SE with mods to the UI. asside from the toshy 2110 (which needed a battery pack rebuild and is being used as a "desktop") the batteries last at least an hour and a half and i am surprised they lasted this long (the compaq is acting like a fly in honey at the moment, jams up unexpectedly)

SolMiester
11-06-2008, 09:16 AM
But nothing depreciates as fast as computers.

Cars do!!

Cicero
11-06-2008, 10:09 AM
Cars do!!
Especially large ones at the moment.

kevin7904
11-06-2008, 06:52 PM
Especially large ones at the moment.

They are depreciating like REAL FAST!!!