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tonesthestudent
20-05-2008, 11:00 PM
Since I have re-formatted my hard drive and had to start from scratch again.
Is it possible to re-install Office on to my computer even tho i've technically used all the licences?

Cheers,
Tones

Speedy Gonzales
20-05-2008, 11:03 PM
What do you mean all licences?? Its only got one key.

It may / should install, thats not what you have to worry about, its activating it.

tonesthestudent
20-05-2008, 11:16 PM
One key gives you the ability to licence three computers. Since I've formatted my computer, re-installing Office would make it four.

Sorry for the confusion, bad england this evening.

Speedy Gonzales
20-05-2008, 11:19 PM
But then you've formatted it, so it should be fine.

You'll soon find out, it wont let you activate it

wainuitech
20-05-2008, 11:31 PM
Should activate OK, if it doesn't simply phone MS and tell them you had to reinstall the PC, you may get asked how many other PC's the license is on, but if its only on two, and you have a 3 user license and yours is the third then no worries.

dlane
21-05-2008, 06:21 PM
If you run into further troubles with MS licenses, you could always side-step the problem now and forever by installing OpenOffice, which is MS Office compatible, but free (no license keys, and no $$). You can download it from the OpenOffice website (http://openoffice.org) or buy a copy on DVD for under $10 from Dick Smith if don't have access to a suitable internet connection.

My company has used OpenOffice for the past 5+ years, and we've found it to be on par with MS Office in terms of features, and we like the fact that we're not beholden to the Beast from Redmond. Plus, it makes life much much more convenient not having to worry about licenses and access codes, etc. Oh, and it runs on Linux and Mac OS X too (at least the newest version, 3.0 does - try the beta).

Dave

the_bogan
21-05-2008, 08:25 PM
If you run into further troubles with MS licenses, you could always side-step the problem now and forever by installing OpenOffice, which is MS Office compatible, but free (no license keys, and no $$). You can download it from the OpenOffice website (http://openoffice.org) or buy a copy on DVD for under $10 from Dick Smith if don't have access to a suitable internet connection.

My company has used OpenOffice for the past 5+ years, and we've found it to be on par with MS Office in terms of features, and we like the fact that we're not beholden to the Beast from Redmond. Plus, it makes life much much more convenient not having to worry about licenses and access codes, etc. Oh, and it runs on Linux and Mac OS X too (at least the newest version, 3.0 does - try the beta).

Dave

I know from experience that there are things that OpenOffice can't handle that Excel can. And that's only as a game modder wanting to handle certain text like files.

A bunch of spreadsheets I use have alot of VBA as well. I'm not certain, but can OpenOffice handle them?

SPARTAN 860
21-05-2008, 09:36 PM
That new guy seems to just be running around promoting non MS stuff. I would't use OpenOffice, its got the bad layout of Office 95 - 2003 and it doesn't so some things that Office can do. OpenOffice is basically for people who do not have enough cash to buy MS Software. The funny thing is, you can find it at my local Disk Smith for $10 :horrified Isn't that ripping off people now. Also, OpenOffice does not support the new file standards (docx etc.) while the old Offices can, via a plugin.

Greven
21-05-2008, 10:02 PM
I prefer MS Office, but if I didn't get it for free through work, I would probably use OpenOffice at home.

SPARTAN 860
21-05-2008, 10:13 PM
I just get it really cheap, since theres a giant uni discount.

gary67
22-05-2008, 07:47 AM
Yes but MS office is not open so what happens in a few years when it's no longer available and you can't access your old files, where as open office format is just that.

Incidently I do use MS office as I like Outlook with its calender and task list stuff that Thunderbird does not have otherwise I would switch.

Scouse
22-05-2008, 10:02 AM
As a confirmed 2003 user not planning to go to 2007, I am curious as to how MS can keep track of the multi-users it allows for student editions. There must be millions of copies sold and iof there are three registrations for each, possibly to different family members, the database of details must be enormouse.

pctek
22-05-2008, 10:36 AM
T I would't use OpenOffice, it doesn't so some things that Office can do.

Like what.

I offer it to my customers. If they don't like it, they can come back and buy MSS Office. I've had exactly 1 person do that out of tons.

SPARTAN 860
22-05-2008, 08:35 PM
I like OpenOffice as much as I like Office 2003, which means I don't like it at all. I mainly use Office because of the ribbon interface, if OpenOffice can give me that, I still won't consider it because of some tasks that it cannot complete. Excel does a lot more that the spreadsheeting program that OpenOffice provides. I only used it once, gave it a week, then changed back. Mainly, its for people who like the old interface of Office 2003. I know some people like it, but I'm not one of them, since I really can't find anything on either OpenOffice or Office 2003 anymore :P.

Zygar
22-05-2008, 09:40 PM
Yes but MS office is not open so what happens in a few years when it's no longer available and you can't access your old files, where as open office format is just that.

I've got some good news for you then... (http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,146162-c,unresolvedtechstandards/article.html)

TGoddard
23-05-2008, 12:54 AM
That new guy seems to just be running around promoting non MS stuff. I would't use OpenOffice, its got the bad layout of Office 95 - 2003 and it doesn't so some things that Office can do.

It does some things MS Office doesn't. For example, it places more emphasis on reusing a set of common styles. This makes your document easier to change down the line. It also uses a standardised and easy to process file format.


OpenOffice is basically for people who do not have enough cash to buy MS Software.

Or people running Linux (by choice - I wouldn't choose Windows if they paid me), or those who prefer it, or people who support open formats. Not everybody shares your opinions - assumptions about motivations need to be based on more than your own opinion about a product.


The funny thing is, you can find it at my local Disk Smith for $10 :horrified Isn't that ripping off people now.

It saves the download. I think as long as up to date copies are available it's a great idea. Unfortunately Dick Smith's copies are never up to date :S


Also, OpenOffice does not support the new file standards (docx etc.) while the old Offices can, via a plugin.

Three guesses why OpenOffice doesn't support docx. Microsoft have certainly made it difficult. Each time Microsoft drops the soap you have two choices: bend over or break out of prison.

gary67
23-05-2008, 07:36 AM
I've got some good news for you then... (http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,146162-c,unresolvedtechstandards/article.html)

Yes that appeared after my initial post it is good news finally from MS

dlane
25-05-2008, 09:59 AM
Yes, I do promote non-Microsoft stuff - and why not? They're a criminal monopoly, and that's because people don't realise that there're many alternatives that are free and at least as good. I think you'll find that in many areas OpenOffice surpasses MS Office in capabilities. Also, you'll find that OpenOffice supports DOCX, etc. Also, you'll find that it supports many VBA macros. I'm afraid, SPARTAN 860, that you're not well informed about OpenOffice. Give 2.4.0 or the beta of 3.0 a try. I think you'll find that they're pretty hard to beat. Particularly for people who don't want to drop hundreds or even a thousand dollars for a retail copy of MS Office.

More importantly, by the way, for those who care about standards (which is anyone who knows enough about computing) OpenOffice writes files that conform to a real open standard, ODF. MS Office does not adhere to any standards, not even OOXML, the "Standard" that MS forced through ISO earlier this year (MS's behaviour is currently being investigated by the EU and the South African standards organisation and the Danes are appealing the ISO decision as having been made in bad faith).

Regards,

Dave