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Billy T
13-05-2008, 05:04 PM
I have to go there for several days to do a job. It is 35 years since I was last there, but I still have indelible and unfortunately vivid memories of Delhi Belly and how long it took me to recover. To this day I still walk with my legs partly crossed and buttocks clenched. :eek:

These days everybody knows not to drink the water, not eat salads and to brush teeth using bottled water only, but what is the current standard like in major hotels? I assume they must have their own water treatment plants but it suddenly crossed my mind that I might be showering in the recycled emissions of umpteen million Indians. (Note to self, don't wash hair in shower unless wearing aqualung with full-face mask.)

Any comment on recent practical experiences over there might be helpful. I will also accept side-commissions to seek out and eliminate any particularly obtuse call-centre workers you may have been annoyed by in recent times. :D

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

wratterus
13-05-2008, 05:08 PM
I will also accept side-commissions to seek out and eliminate any particularly obtuse call-centre workers you may have been annoyed by in recent times. :D

Can't say I've been to India recently, or ever, for that matter, but I will start making a list.... :p

SolMiester
13-05-2008, 05:13 PM
Been twice, 1991 & 2002.....The 1st time was a nightmare for me, couldnt stand the food, everything was such a hassle etc etc. 2nd time I loved it, rented a house for 2 months with motorbike...oh and had a new squeeze!! hehe..

Anyway great food yay! The Indians are so happy, be sure to mix it up with them in there markets etc, a real experience. House boats (down the south) were great.

Once we had been there several weeks, it was like we were part of the community so were not bother by sellers all the time..

Great place...enjoy!!

roddy_boy
13-05-2008, 05:34 PM
In before beeswax screams racism.

PaulD
13-05-2008, 05:35 PM
These days everybody knows not to drink the water, not eat salads and to brush teeth using bottled water only, but what is the current standard like in major hotels? I assume they must have their own water treatment plants
Cheers

Went through Southern India for a month in 2001. The larger hotels left bottled water for drinking. Both Coke and Pepsi have major water bottling plants so factory sealed water isn't a problem. The bottles get recycled but you are trusting them to boil the water. We stuck to a vegetarian diet as that's what the locals would be eating themselves and 4 of us had no gastric upsets at all.

If you need local directions or advice try to get several answers so you can see if there is a concensus.

Thebananamonkey
13-05-2008, 05:46 PM
I will also accept side-commissions to seek out and eliminate any particularly obtuse call-centre workers you may have been annoyed by in recent times.

I'll pay you whatever you want to take out the entire call center staff that work for my company. As long as it's slow and painful. Like their service.

beeswax34
13-05-2008, 08:39 PM
I have to go there for several days to do a job. It is 35 years since I was last there, but I still have indelible and unfortunately vivid memories of Delhi Belly and how long it took me to recover. To this day I still walk with my legs partly crossed and buttocks clenched. :eek:

These days everybody knows not to drink the water, not eat salads and to brush teeth using bottled water only, but what is the current standard like in major hotels? I assume they must have their own water treatment plants but it suddenly crossed my mind that I might be showering in the recycled emissions of umpteen million Indians. (Note to self, don't wash hair in shower unless wearing aqualung with full-face mask.)

Any comment on recent practical experiences over there might be helpful. I will also accept side-commissions to seek out and eliminate any particularly obtuse call-centre workers you may have been annoyed by in recent times. :D If you are going to the Taj Mahal however, be VERY careful of thieves.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Yup, went in December and Jan 08. It really depends on what kindof hotel you're staying in. For us, we stuck to bottled water all the way through, no matter where we stayed.

In the restaurants however, its fine. There's very little danger there. Most serve bottled water anyway.

The water in the shower is actually really good and upto standards. My uncle works for the muncipal corporation (in Bombay) and he took me for a tour of the water treatment plant and all the pipelines. Well upto spec :thumbs:

In terms of transport, in Bombay, you can't beat the bus service (bit crammed but quick) or rickshaws which is just absolutely great fun. The new malls are really good to shop in and the cuisine and food has gotten much more upscale and very hygienic.

R2x1
13-05-2008, 10:31 PM
It is no use taking a Vodem to India, they don't really believe in wireless (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Phone_and_electric_lines_India.jpg) communication.

roddy_boy
13-05-2008, 10:34 PM
404?

R2x1
13-05-2008, 10:40 PM
Un 404'd

beeswax34
13-05-2008, 11:50 PM
Un 404'd

Haha, thats awesome. But considering the fact that a per minute calling from a cellphone in India costs about 3 cents (NZ), hopefully all that will disappear soon.

robbyp
13-05-2008, 11:55 PM
I have to go there for several days to do a job. It is 35 years since I was last there, but I still have indelible and unfortunately vivid memories of Delhi Belly and how long it took me to recover. To this day I still walk with my legs partly crossed and buttocks clenched. :eek:

These days everybody knows not to drink the water, not eat salads and to brush teeth using bottled water only, but what is the current standard like in major hotels? I assume they must have their own water treatment plants but it suddenly crossed my mind that I might be showering in the recycled emissions of umpteen million Indians. (Note to self, don't wash hair in shower unless wearing aqualung with full-face mask.)

Any comment on recent practical experiences over there might be helpful. I will also accept side-commissions to seek out and eliminate any particularly obtuse call-centre workers you may have been annoyed by in recent times. :D

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

ALso avoid oranges, they inject them with stuf to make them last longer in the heat, and they can become very toxic. It is not a place I want to go to really, but everyone I know who has gone their has got the deli belly, and one person I heard of who ate bad oranges, still hasn't fully recovered, and still has a low immune system.

beeswax34
14-05-2008, 12:40 AM
ALso avoid oranges, they inject them with stuf to make them last longer in the heat, and they can become very toxic. It is not a place I want to go to really, but everyone I know who has gone their has got the deli belly, and one person I heard of who ate bad oranges, still hasn't fully recovered, and still has a low immune system.

Oranges from the supermarkets are OK though. Actually supermarkets are good for whatever fresh fruit and veg you want. Thats where we got ours from for over 2 months and no complaints at all.

Strommer
14-05-2008, 10:20 AM
Was there twice, in 2001 and 2006. I was very careful to only drink bottled water, etc etc but both times got dysentery really bad, it took two trips to doctors to get the correct (heavy duty) medicine and even then it took 3 weeks to clear. Consequently I will not return to India, which is a shame because I do like the sights, people, food, music, culture in general. About getting sick: I have travelled extensively in SE Asia and lived in / ate in some dodgy / dirty areas, but never had the sh*ts and never was sick otherwise. Mexico also no problem. But India, horrible dysentery! My wife is immune to bugs in India; some people are. You may try taking several acidopholis/bifadopholus capsules a day - we met a couple from England who said it worked for them - get these capsules from a health-supplement store.

Don't let the recent terrorism deter you. Jaipur is the top tourist destination so don't miss it. The Taj also - I was blown away by the Taj, even comparing it to temples in SE Asia and European cathedrals and monuments.

Be prepared to get ripped off, and it WILL happen, e.g. when your driver / hotelier / shop owner is soooo nice and friendly. They will see you as a walking ATM. And be prepared to be hassled continuously by beggars, shop owners, taxi drivers, etc.

Air pollution in Delhi (in their winter) is horrible, even worse than in China or Bangkok. Unbelievably bad, like a sci fi movie.

BTW, India is a good place to get pharmaceuticals. Cheap, good, and some don't even require a script. Antiseptics, topical skin creams, antibiotics, etc.

Billy T
14-05-2008, 06:04 PM
Been to Jaipur, the Taj Mahal and the Red Fort etc back in 1973 when pollution was only terrible and crowds were smaller. That time I got sick just after leaving (warning signs on flight out) and spent 3 days on the floor of a hotel bathroom in Greece. It took several months to recover fully and get back to normal body weight.

I won't be doing the tourist thing at all, I'm on a 4-day contract to evaluate an electrical installation and produce a report so it is a ship in and ship out deal. Flights are business class because they want us to hit the ground running (probably not an appropriate expression right now!) and I'll be staying at an adjacent hotel which will probably have 4 or 5 stars as it caters for people much more important than I am or will ever be.

Trouble is I'll be in Delhi which draws its water from the local sewage plant, industrial waste disposal centre, mortuary and cemetery (otherwise known as the Ganges) and their water processing system is in crisis. I'm told by those who should know that even bottled water is suspect now because it has very high levels of pesticides, so imported water is essential.

Having watched Ramsey's kitchen nightmares a couple of times and seen the rotting food some of them try to serve up I think I'll write my will before I leave.

Steve-L's experience is what I'm concerned about, while working I've been backstage in quite a few good restaurants here in NZ and what I've seen definitely put some of them permanently off my list. You just don't know what goes on behind the scenes and a splash of tap water is all it takes to lay you low.

If it wasn't for the money I'd not go.

Cheers

Billy 8-{) :waughh:

Renmoo
14-05-2008, 07:23 PM
It might be worthwhile to bring along a couple of iodine tablets :rolleyes: if wholesome water is really not available.

Cheers :)

Renmoo
14-05-2008, 07:31 PM
acidopholis/bifadopholus capsules
I have a feeling that it is spelt "acidophilus" rather than "acidopholis"? Similarly, "bifidophilus"? Probiotics like these might be useful in hampering nasties.

Cheers :)

John H
14-05-2008, 09:56 PM
Billy, rather than taking iodine tablets as suggested (because they make the water taste foul) you may like to think about buying one of those Steripen things that are being sold these days to travellers and trampers.

They cost a bit, but convenience and taste may make them worthwhile. I found them for sale at Bivouac, but you may be able to get them cheaper elsewhere:

http://www.bivouac.co.nz/default.aspx?G=1&T=115&P=969

My daughter has been to India for two trips (one included Nepal) and she has never had a stomach bug or the trots. Two other people we know have been there - one was fine, but the other got some nasty bug which led to a later emergency admission to hospital in Italy - it took a long time to diagnose the problem but it was some kind of fungal infection in the gut, and he was a sick man for quite a long time. Makes $200 for a Steripen sound a worthwhile investment (depending upon what the contract is worth of course!).

My son and daughter in law have been to Nepal, and she has been to Pakistan - no probs for either of them. Just make sure you don't eat salad veges that have been washed in water, only eat fruit that you peel, and do your thing with water and you should be apples.

Greg
14-05-2008, 11:25 PM
I'll be in Delhi which draws its water from the local sewage plant, industrial waste disposal centre, mortuary and cemetery (otherwise known as the Ganges) :lol:

I'd get some water purification tablets from the pharmacy here first to use even in the bottled water you get over there.

Never been to India myself (one fine day I hope to) but the same precautions apply to most countries.