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whitts
28-04-2008, 03:18 AM
Hey,
I am thinking of buying a new pc or one in good condition, excluding a monitor or keyboard or mouse. My price limit is around $500, what would i expect for that price? I want to use it for everyday uses with a bit of gaming and photo editing but nothng too extreme. I saw this advertised for $530:

CPU: AMD Athlon X2 Dual Core 4600+ 2.4Ghz 1mb l2 AM2 - Very fast Dual Core CPU enhanced multitasking

Motherboard: M2N-MX SE Plus
Asus M2N-MX SE Plus Support AMD Socket AM2+ Cord Core CPU & AM2 Athlon 64 CPU mATX Geforce 6100 Chipset Onboard Video Share Up to 256MB 2XDDR2 800 PCI-E x 16 SATAII Raid)

Ram: 2GB DDR2-800 dual channel High performance memory with low latencies

Hard drive: seagate 250GB SATAII 7200RPM

Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 6100
integrated with shared 256MB memory

Network: 10/100 mbps

Sound: SoundMax High Definition Audio

DVD: asus 20xDual layer DVD writer


Good deal? Any help would be great.

Thanks.

gary67
28-04-2008, 07:41 AM
What operating system is it running XP or Vista makes a difference but should run both well.

wainuitech
28-04-2008, 09:23 AM
Budget system with onboard graphics, might be Ok for things like playing in places like Yahoo etc, but not for any sort of serious gaming,

You dont mention the Case, Power Supply, or OS?

Just doing a quick price add up from some of my vendors - looking at those components, someone would have to be giving away the OS, or it doesn't come with one.

Old story - get what you pay for.

jwil1
28-04-2008, 10:07 AM
Posted in F1 this morning:

http://www.trademe.co.nz/Browse/Listing.aspx?id=152147477

Second hand machine with OS

MEC
28-04-2008, 11:34 AM
Sounds like a pretty decent machine, but as others have mentioned, it's missing some information. I would rather go with XP than Vista, Vista is heavy on resources and 2GB of RAM is, I would almost say, a minimum.

pcuser42
28-04-2008, 10:09 PM
For cheap PCs and onboard graphics, XP is better. For all others, it's Vista ftw.

whitts
29-04-2008, 02:21 AM
I do have a xp os so that is not a worry. Whats a decent grahpics card that wud play most of the games currently? What are your thoughts on buying a pc that is not new...likelyhood of future trouble with them?

Battleneter2
29-04-2008, 02:21 PM
I do have a xp os so that is not a worry. Whats a decent grahpics card that wud play most of the games currently? What are your thoughts on buying a pc that is not new...likelyhood of future trouble with them?

If you are on a tight budget "and it seems you are" I would go for one of these two configs and seriously consider overclocking. The Intel will easily beat the AMD if overclocking both to there near max, on stock they will perform very similar.

Intel
$69.00 CORSAIR TWIN2X2048-6400 2x1GB DDR2 800MHZ CL5
$112.00 XFX MG-630I-7109 nForce 630i MCP/GeForce 7100i INTEL LGA775
$110.00 Intel Pentium E2180, 2.0GHz (OC up to 3.0GHz)
$75.00 Asus ATX Case w/ 350w PSU
$41.00 Pioneer DVR-212 Dual Layer Serial-ATA DVD Writer review
$80.00 Seagate Barracuda 250GB 7200 8MB NCQ 3.5" SATAII
= $487.00 Total inc gst, ex shipping

AMD
$69.00 CORSAIR TWIN2X2048-6400 2x1GB DDR2 800MHZ CL5
$141.00 Gigabyte GA-MA78GM-S2H AM2+ Phenom/ AM2 Athlon 64 AMD 780G (slightly faster OB GPU)
$97.00 2.1GHz 4600+ w/hsf (OC up to 2.8GHz)
$75.00 Asus ATX Case w/ 350w PSU
$41.00 Pioneer DVR-212 Dual Layer Serial-ATA DVD Writer review
$80.00 Seagate Barracuda 250GB 7200 8MB NCQ 3.5" SATAII
= $503.00 Total inc gst, ex shipping

Borrowed from (slight alterations)
http://www.gpforums.co.nz/thread/302905/?s=

As for additional video card a 9600Gt at around $240 is a excellent performer, or a 8800GT at about $290 is about 15-20% faster.

whitts
29-04-2008, 03:34 PM
Might be a stupid question - but what is overclocking?

wainuitech
29-04-2008, 06:28 PM
Only problem with the prices mentioned above - unless you are going to build it yourself & collect all the parts yourself, you need to add The price for someone to build it, and freight.

The freight from various places can easily combine to be $30 +

To answer your question regarding overclocking ---

To put it in its simplest terms, overclocking is taking a computer component such as a processor and running at a specification higher than rated by the manufacturer.

Also read into that - the moment you overclock a component theres a very good chance you can kiss goodbye to the components Warranty, as you are running it at a higher spec than it was designed to run at. Over clocking voids the warranty, shortens the Components life, usually creates more heat, and if over clocked to much will make the system unstable.

Battleneter2
30-04-2008, 09:20 AM
Also read into that - the moment you overclock a component theres a very good chance you can kiss goodbye to the components Warranty, as you are running it at a higher spec than it was designed to run at. Over clocking voids the warranty, shortens the Components life, usually creates more heat, and if over clocked to much will make the system unstable.

Great statement about overclocking 10 years ago lol

Now to present day, manufacture processes on modern silicon is so good there is very little binning occurring. Most product is market down due to marketing necessity (with multiplier locked lower being the main difference on CPU's).

As for shortening the life span, that to is hugely debatable. Try telling that to my old P2 266 clocked at 400MHZ that ran for around 6 years before I replaced it (got demoted a few times lol). How about my AMD 3000 1.8gig now hitting 4 years running at 2.8 gig (currently in a fileserver) just the long standing examples. For the most part if you are sensible, a overclocked CPU will last as long as you require it.

As for voiding warranty, its not really an issue as above, and there is no way to tell you overclocked it if it failed (assuming you return just the processor).

Overclocking is not for everyone, just read up yourself about "current' overclocking and make up your own mind, there are dozens of enthusiast forums. Overclocking is now a safe valid option to save money.

SPARTAN 860
30-04-2008, 07:26 PM
Overclocking is supported by some companies, as long as you use their own tools that they provided for overclocking. however, these tools don't really let you improve your speed so much, so yes, overclocking via your BIOS does void your warranty. Some hardware does support overclocking (expensive ones) but when you overclock crazily and fry it, yes, its gone.

wainuitech
30-04-2008, 08:03 PM
Great statement about overclocking 10 years ago lol

Now to present day, manufacture processes on modern silicon is so good there is very little binning occurring. Most product is market down due to marketing necessity (with multiplier locked lower being the main difference on CPU's).

As for shortening the life span, that to is hugely debatable. Try telling that to my old P2 266 clocked at 400MHZ that ran for around 6 years before I replaced it (got demoted a few times lol). How about my AMD 3000 1.8gig now hitting 4 years running at 2.8 gig (currently in a fileserver) just the long standing examples. For the most part if you are sensible, a overclocked CPU will last as long as you require it.

As for voiding warranty, its not really an issue as above, and there is no way to tell you overclocked it if it failed (assuming you return just the processor).

Overclocking is not for everyone, just read up yourself about "current' overclocking and make up your own mind, there are dozens of enthusiast forums. Overclocking is now a safe valid option to save money.

Well you tell that to a customer of mine late last year, He called me after damaging the pc -over clocking, 2 months old , it went all pear shaped and when he tried to claim the warranty he was refused - It was a Compaq PC, and they inspected it and told him warranty voided as it had been over clocked.. The tell tale sign was the voltage had been fiddled with, and a real obvious burn mark on the CPU.

The reason he called was no one else he phoned would touch Compaq to repair the damage components.

Tell you what - if someone takes your advice and over clocks and a warranty is voided, I assume you will gladly reimburse that person the replacement price because of the advice given.

While some components can be over clocked by the manufactures inbuilt tools, some people still push it to far.

I have seen several that have had the CPU over clocked and run as unstable as hell.

SPARTAN 860
30-04-2008, 08:55 PM
Urg CPU overclocks... at least GPUs are designed to be overclocked. Sometimes, overclocking seems to be rather close to overcooking.