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rumpty
16-04-2008, 12:26 PM
I have a CD-R which had some JPG files put on it about 5 years ago.
Now it is proving difficult to read. Neither my ASUS 1814 BLT or a Ricoh MP7240A writer will read it, but an old Acer 56x CD-ROM reader has no trouble at all. Same result in XP or Ubuntu.

But if I try Isobuster, in XP, with the Asus writer, all the files on the CD-R show, and can be extracted. So there seems to be no physical incompatibility between the Asus writer and the CD-R. In view of that, is there something fussy about the newish writers, compared with the older CD-ROM reader?

Bantu
16-04-2008, 03:41 PM
Does it read other CD's?

It is possible the CD has lost it's data or partially lost it. Depending on the CD Quality and where it has been stored they can loose their data no problem.

CD's, DVD's are the same.

Take a look at http://www.digitalfaq.com/media/dvdmedia.htm

utopian201
16-04-2008, 04:09 PM
I would have thought a cd-writer capable drive would have more tolerance for errors on a disc.

If you burn something important to a disc, make sure it is a quality disc, not a cheap one. Cheap ones degrade faster as you have experienced.

rumpty
16-04-2008, 04:40 PM
I would have thought a cd-writer capable drive would have more tolerance for errors on a disc.


I would have thought so too, but the evidence is that the old CDROM reader works, and the writer(s) don't. I guess the old reader is less fussy, in some way.

Agent_24
16-04-2008, 07:54 PM
or it's better quality and can handle crap discs

rumpty
16-04-2008, 09:10 PM
or it's better quality and can handle crap discs

That would be a laugh really - it was literally picked up in a discarded computer box off the side of the road.

The point is though that the Asus writer will read the disc if is given some help by using Isobuster.

kahawai chaser
16-04-2008, 10:21 PM
Maybe try a free CD repair program like cd recovery toolbox (http://www.snapfiles.com/reviews/cd-recovery-toolbox-free/cdrecovery.html) to allow compatibility in any cd drive...

rumpty
17-04-2008, 05:46 PM
Maybe try a free CD repair program like cd recovery toolbox (http://www.snapfiles.com/reviews/cd-recovery-toolbox-free/cdrecovery.html) to allow compatibility in any cd drive...

I'll try it. Thanks.

Graham L
17-04-2008, 06:38 PM
Surely you need to read the files only once.

Then you just COPY THEM TO ANOTHER CD. (or two other CDs).

Different drives will have different responses to a particular CD. They depend on '1's and '0's refelecting different amounts of light . That could well be change depending on the ambient temperature. The dyes in writable CDs will change over time, and if they are exposed to the sun.

If you can read files "sometimes" on a five-year old CD (or even on a younger one), it's time to make a new one. While you can. ;)

kahawai chaser
17-04-2008, 09:20 PM
Changes in technology might contribute to reading issues. If a disk was written at a certain speed, then it's likely to more readable (i.e. optimized) on the Acer drive or similar drives around that time of 5 years ago.

Particularly if auto write settings were applied, which might not strictly be suitable for proper readability on newer and generally faster drives, - which might have to employ a backwards compatibility mechanism to try, and hence struggle to read a older written disc.

Also, cd-r disc thickness, dye composition, and manufacturing techniques are likely to have changed so that they are more optimized for the newer drives - and not for older discs -unless a propriety system is embedded with the drive (some might recall the Mt rainier system introduced for cd-rw's to aid formatting). Possibly the case of the old trying to adapt to the new...

rumpty
17-04-2008, 10:05 PM
Changes in technology might contribute to reading issues. If a disk was written at a certain speed, then it's likely to more readable (i.e. optimized) on the Acer drive or similar drives around that time of 5 years ago.

Particularly if auto write settings were applied, which might not strictly be suitable for proper readability on newer and generally faster drives, - which might have to employ a backwards compatibility mechanism to try, and hence struggle to read a older written disc.

Also, cd-r disc thickness, dye composition, and manufacturing techniques are likely to have changed so that they are more optimized for the newer drives - and not for older discs -unless a propriety system is embedded with the drive (some might recall the Mt rainier system introduced for cd-rw's to aid formatting). Possibly the case of the old trying to adapt to the new...

Yes, those factors could well be a good part of the problem. It certainly doesn't auger well for long term storage of files though.

feersumendjinn
17-04-2008, 11:21 PM
Cd/dvd rot is becoming a problem, they're not as indestructible as we were led to believe:
http://www.google.co.nz/imgres?imgurl=http://www.rdrop.com/~half/General/CDRot/CDRot.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.rdrop.com/~half/General/CDRot/CDRot.html&h=93&w=127&sz=35&tbnid=o3Hx1d2DSDMJ:&tbnh=93&tbnw=127&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dcd%2Brot%2Bimage&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=1&ct=image&cd=1
:horrified