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View Full Version : How to cook those raw mushy sausages you get from supermarkets?



qazwsxokmijn
04-01-2008, 12:18 AM
As title says - those raw sausages that are still all mushy and soft in their casings. Do I need to boil them till they are hardened, then fry them? Or do I just fry them?

Jen
04-01-2008, 06:29 AM
Well I have yet to manage to cook them in the fry pan only without ending up with raw sausage meat in the middle still and carbonised on the outside, so ...

I boil them first and then fry lightly to give them a crispy skin. :thumbs:

kenj
04-01-2008, 06:40 AM
To cook from raw, they need to be done slowly in a frypan. They seem to taste better if done that way. Slower the better, turned often. Can also be done in the oven in a greased oven tray. BBQ'd with fried onions, sauce and a slice of bread at the warehouse fund raiserBBQ is the best of all

Ken ... the househusband and food eating expert. :) :)

Greg
04-01-2008, 07:51 AM
Boiled? Ewww. :yuck: They need to be pan fried. The method is at a medium temperature and to turn them gradually but frequently.

Sweep
04-01-2008, 08:23 AM
I boil then first then fry later.

When they are brown they are done and if black they are stuffed.

There is another way though.

Buy raw sausage meat minus casing. Chop up onion(s) really fine. Add herbs or spices to taste like sage or thyme. Make patties and lightly flour. Just fry.

This saves on tomato sauce!!

The only reason I ever use tomato sauce is to disguise the tast of the pork or beef flavoured sausages cooked on a BBQ by some person whom does not have a clue. Once upon a time I used to think that pork sausages were made out of pork.

I remember inviting a woman to my place once and I cooked a carpetbag steak with mushroom sauce. I thought it might be a nice evening.
When she asked for tomato sauce before tasting the meal she was never invited back. I think she still has my GI Blues record that I lent her prior to this event.

somebody
04-01-2008, 08:56 AM
I've always cooked the raw venison sausages you can get from the supermarket straight from the fridge in a pan with some oil, over a medium heat. Boiling them first takes out the flavour and makes them rubbery. The trick really is to be patient, and cook them slowly, as other posters have already said.

pctek
04-01-2008, 09:06 AM
Raw mushy? You mean you actually usually buy precooked sausages?!! Yuk.


I grill them. They have enough fat that I don't want to fry them.
Or the best is barbecued of course.

Or I grill them and then cut them up to make different dishes.

Keep your temperatures lower and you don't get burned on the outside and raw in the middle. Its not hard.

Metla
04-01-2008, 09:19 AM
Throw them in the bin, Sausage's are a poor excuse for food, and there is no need to eat them unless at a BBQ or sausage sizzle.

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 09:26 AM
Raw mushy? You mean you actually usually buy precooked sausages?!! Yuk.


I grill them. They have enough fat that I don't want to fry them.
Or the best is barbecued of course.

Or I grill them and then cut them up to make different dishes.

Keep your temperatures lower and you don't get burned on the outside and raw in the middle. Its not hard.


I do this too. Or bake them so they cook evenly without having to turn them. Then fry some onion rings and melt cheese on them....

Richard
04-01-2008, 09:32 AM
A good sausage, fried slowly, then wrapped in a slice of buttered fresh white bread with a splash of tomato sauce is indeed good nosh. As is a well done 'Sausages and Mash' with gravy perhaps with onions in it. Yum yum!:p

John H
04-01-2008, 09:40 AM
I am surprised no-one has mentioned this, so maybe I am out of date...

I was always taught to prick each sausage with a fork about three times (sort of crossways, evenly spaced along the length of the sausage) before frying. This releases the pressure as the sausages cook, so the contents don't come oozing out of both ends, and so the sausage casing doesn't split. Doesn't anyone else do that?

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 09:51 AM
If Im frying, the constant turning tends to keep things from splitting. I guess because your actually there watching them you tend to take them off before they split. I think. Not sure.:)

John H
04-01-2008, 09:52 AM
Well I have yet to manage to cook them in the fry pan only without ending up with raw sausage meat in the middle still and carbonised on the outside, so ...

I boil them first and then fry lightly to give them a crispy skin. :thumbs:

This is the method recommended by health authorities before committing sausages to the barbecue. It has a much better chance of killing off all the nasties that remain in uncooked meat...

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 09:54 AM
My nan did that to mince too. well, cook it in a pot, let it cool, take the fat off that had risen to the top, then cook it the next day like normal...

Greven
04-01-2008, 09:57 AM
Throw them in the bin, Sausage's are a poor excuse for food, and there is no need to eat them unless at a BBQ or sausage sizzle.

Sausages are good for a lot of different meals, and wild venison sausages are good on their own. Supermarket venison is like an old boot when compared to wild venison.

John H
04-01-2008, 10:08 AM
Another good hint for cooking sausages is to make sure that you have good quality snarks, not the garbage that is often on sale in supermarkets. Try going to a decent continental small goods maker and try out the different variety of snarks that they have been making on the continent for centuries.

There is a wurst maker in Bishopdale in ChCh, another one in Albany in Auckland on The Avenue, and a Polish sausage maker in the Hutt Valley. And of course there is the Blackball sausage maker from the Wet Coast - probably more famous for salami, but they do really good tasty snarks as well, including venison.

At the Arts Centre in ChCh there are two stalls that do bratwurst and other continental sausages in bread rolls. Not bad either. There used to be a good one at the Victoria Market in Auckland but I don't know if it is still there.

So, you don't need to eat the mushy sausages at all - once you have tried the good continental styles (or good quality British snarks like the Cumberland sausage in Britain) you won't go back to the junk from supermarkets. Good quality sausages are usually firmer or more chunky in consistency - they aren't pureed to hell to disguise their original contents like the cheapies are... :yuck:

Sweep
04-01-2008, 10:37 AM
Sausages are good for a lot of different meals, and wild venison sausages are good on their own. Supermarket venison is like an old boot when compared to wild venison.

I have tried supermarket venison. I give the sausages a poke with a fork. This makes the sausage slightly annoyed rather than wild.;)

qazwsxokmijn
04-01-2008, 11:28 AM
Hah, didn't expect I can just fry them straight away. Last time I did that I gave 3 large sausages to the dog.

How many minutes you guys reckon it takes for a raw sausage to fry?

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 11:40 AM
Not sure to be honest, low heat and turning, could be a while for larger ones.

'Sausages must be purchased from reputable manufacturers and/or butcher shops. If slimy, wet, or mouldy on the surface the product must be rejected. A rosy-red hue often indicates and abundance of chemicals (nitrates) and preservatives.

Sausages do not freeze well because of their high fat and salt content. '

http://www.foodreference.com/html/artsausageshamspates.html

plod
04-01-2008, 11:47 AM
If you buy your sausages from the supermarket, I shall suggest Sensational Sausages.

qazwsxokmijn
04-01-2008, 11:48 AM
Another good hint for cooking sausages is to make sure that you have good quality snarks, not the garbage that is often on sale in supermarkets. Try going to a decent continental small goods maker and try out the different variety of snarks that they have been making on the continent for centuries.

There is a wurst maker in Bishopdale in ChCh, another one in Albany in Auckland on The Avenue, and a Polish sausage maker in the Hutt Valley. And of course there is the Blackball sausage maker from the Wet Coast - probably more famous for salami, but they do really good tasty snarks as well, including venison.

At the Arts Centre in ChCh there are two stalls that do bratwurst and other continental sausages in bread rolls. Not bad either. There used to be a good one at the Victoria Market in Auckland but I don't know if it is still there.

So, you don't need to eat the mushy sausages at all - once you have tried the good continental styles (or good quality British snarks like the Cumberland sausage in Britain) you won't go back to the junk from supermarkets. Good quality sausages are usually firmer or more chunky in consistency - they aren't pureed to hell to disguise their original contents like the cheapies are... :yuck:
I'd walk in one of those stores and walk straight back out. I have no idea which sausage is which. Only sausages I've ever really eaten is Swiss Frankfurters, BBQ sausages and....that's pretty much it.

Sweep
04-01-2008, 12:03 PM
Not sure to be honest, low heat and turning, could be a while for larger ones.

'Sausages must be purchased from reputable manufacturers and/or butcher shops. If slimy, wet, or mouldy on the surface the product must be rejected. A rosy-red hue often indicates and abundance of chemicals (nitrates) and preservatives.

Sausages do not freeze well because of their high fat and salt content. '

http://www.foodreference.com/html/artsausageshamspates.html

High fat is why I would boil before frying. Very much like making a stew.

I take it you believe in all information in the link you gave. All this information is 100% correct?

Richard
04-01-2008, 12:09 PM
The ultimate sausage of course is a haggis, and anyone who says they don't like it hasn't had a good one ( accompanied by a wee or large dram of the best of Scotland) Yum yum again. :p

pctek
04-01-2008, 12:13 PM
This is the method recommended by health authorities before committing sausages to the barbecue. It has a much better chance of killing off all the nasties that remain in uncooked meat...

Thats because a lot of people can't cook.

As I said before, BBQ or oven, keep the temperature down lower. You crank it up and thats why you get burned outsides and raw insides.

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 12:16 PM
High fat is why I would boil before frying. Very much like making a stew.

I take it you believe in all information in the link you gave. All this information is 100% correct?


I believe mainly the parts I took out. Unsure if it is 100% true. Me myself I like the fat.:o

Sweep
04-01-2008, 12:27 PM
Hah, didn't expect I can just fry them straight away. Last time I did that I gave 3 large sausages to the dog.

How many minutes you guys reckon it takes for a raw sausage to fry?

You can fry "raw" sausages meat. Would you fry gravy beef?

Is the dog still alive? Did you only fry 3 and give all to the dog?

A little like asking how many minutes to fry a minute steak.

I happen to like my steak blue. This will still go "moo" when I cut it.

Light a candle and toss an aged fillet over a few times.

John H
04-01-2008, 12:28 PM
I'd walk in one of those stores and walk straight back out. I have no idea which sausage is which. Only sausages I've ever really eaten is Swiss Frankfurters, BBQ sausages and....that's pretty much it.

Ask the shop owner for a guided tour. People that make and sell these sort of sausages are usually enthusiasts. And of course they would like to convert you into a regular customer.

Some of the sausages in those shops are described in terms of their cooking method - frankfurters with which you are familiar, are one of the boiling sausages, whereas other varieties are fryers. The Wurst shop in ChCh gives cooking instructions for each of their products (or they used to - I haven't been there for a while).

Sweep
04-01-2008, 12:32 PM
Thats because a lot of people can't cook.

As I said before, BBQ or oven, keep the temperature down lower. You crank it up and thats why you get burned outsides and raw insides.

With steak I crank up the temp in a fry pan and have the result you mention.

But that is what I want.

Anyone tried Black Pudding? A kind of sausage as it comes in a skin.
I happen to think the skin will not get crunchy if cooked.

You might like to try a recipe from Northland.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/4343977a10.html

plod
04-01-2008, 12:48 PM
With steak I crank up the temp in a fry pan and have the result you mention.

But that is what I want.

Anyone tried Black Pudding? A kind of sausage as it comes in a skin.
I happen to think the skin will not get crunchy if cooked.

You might like to try a recipe from Northland.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/4343977a10.html

Love black pudding, but as I'm the only one in the house that will eat it, it's not a regular occurrence

robbyp
04-01-2008, 01:02 PM
Throw them in the bin, Sausage's are a poor excuse for food, and there is no need to eat them unless at a BBQ or sausage sizzle.

Or you could buy real sausages, although you pay a lot for them. You can get some good ones from organic shops that don't have all the nasty preservatives in them that make them taste like sulphur.

rob_on_guitar
04-01-2008, 01:05 PM
Or just have a steak:D

FoxyMX
04-01-2008, 01:33 PM
How many minutes you guys reckon it takes for a raw sausage to fry?

I have never had the sausages you are referring to but would guess that it would take about 20 minutes to cook on a low heat, turning regularly.

Wild, organic venison sausages are the best. I can't eat any of the supermarket rubbish anymore and am lucky that I don't have to. :thumbs:

Sweep
04-01-2008, 01:52 PM
I have never had the sausages you are referring to but would guess that it would take about 20 minutes to cook on a low heat, turning regularly.

Wild, organic venison sausages are the best. I can't eat any of the supermarket rubbish anymore and am lucky that I don't have to. :thumbs:

I just have to ask:-
How do the deer who live in the bush and also supply venison get the chance to eat organic food? If the deer are in the bush being "wild" then who harvests? Who makes the sausages?

I would also think that you make you own bread and butter, jam and I could go on.

Are you saying that you and family are entirely self sufficient? Possibly I am wrong and you do use a supermarket but not for sausages.

You could use wild venison or organic venison. One form would be shot or killed in the bush and the other would be farmed I think.

FoxyMX
04-01-2008, 02:01 PM
I just have to ask:-
How do the deer who live in the bush and also supply venison get the chance to eat organic food? If the deer are in the bush being "wild" then who harvests? Who makes the sausages?

The "organic food" that I am referring to is grown on the backcountry hills and in the bush naturally by nature itself, not "farmed" with fertilisers, pesticides, etc added. The deer are wild and free to eat whatever they please.

The deer are harvested by hunters and the sausages are made up by a selected butcher using minimal fat, salt and no preservatives.

The sausages themselves are not strictly organic but the main ingredient, the venison, definitely is. Virtually no fat resides in the frying pan after cooking, unlike the 1-2cm pool formed by supermarket sausages.


Edit: Just noticed your edit. Yes, I am referring to wild deer shot by family members who are hunters.

Ninjabear
04-01-2008, 02:23 PM
Oh i remember buying sausages in a bag once at pak n save .

I boiled then fry them and when I ate it I found tiny bits of bones inside the sausages..

pctek
04-01-2008, 02:25 PM
Virtually no fat resides in the frying pan after cooking, unlike the 1-2cm pool formed by supermarket sausages.


But you know meat fat has all the flavour. Very healthy I'm sure to be fat free but it does nothing for flavour at all.

Pato
04-01-2008, 04:30 PM
The ultimate sausage of course is a haggis, and anyone who says they don't like it hasn't had a good one ( accompanied by a wee or large dram of the best of Scotland) Yum yum again. :p
I couldn't agree more. You can't beat the Haggis.

FoxyMX
04-01-2008, 05:40 PM
But you know meat fat has all the flavour. Very healthy I'm sure to be fat free but it does nothing for flavour at all.

I didn't say that our sausages have no fat in them. They just don't swim in it after cooking them. :rolleyes:

Nothing wrong with the taste either. In fact for first timers it can be a bit overwhelming with the first bite but everyone comes back for more, even my Dad and he's the fussiest person on the planet when it comes to food. :rolleyes:

R2x1
04-01-2008, 05:47 PM
If people were roaming about trying to shoot you and make you into sausages, you would be just as wild about it as the deer are.

Greg
04-01-2008, 06:03 PM
And of course there is the Blackball sausage maker from the Wet Coast - probably more famous for salami, but they do really good tasty snarks as well, including venison.Thanks for that - I'm always after good salamis which you can't get in the supermarkets. Also they've got such a hopelessly lousy website I'm asking them to let me upgrade it! :thumbs:

bob_doe_nz
04-01-2008, 06:09 PM
Hmm, I've made my own bacon. Perhaps it's time I tried making my own bangers.

John H
04-01-2008, 06:10 PM
Thanks for that - I'm always after good salamis which you can't get in the supermarkets. Also they've got such a hopelessly lousy website I'm asking them to let me upgrade it! :thumbs:

That would be a good idea Greg! The Blackball salamis tend to be lower fat than most of the others I know. They don't have the big white chunks...

robsonde
05-01-2008, 12:56 PM
Susan: "Haven't you got any muesli?"
Albert: "Is that some kind of sausage?"
Susan: "It's nuts and grains."
Albert: "Any fat in it?"
Susan: "I don't think so."
Albert: "How're you supposed to fry it, then?"
Susan: "You don't fry it."
Albert: "You call that breakfast?"
Susan: "It doesn't have to be fried to be breakfast. I mean, you mentioned porridge, and you don't fry porridge--"
Albert: "Who says?"

johcar
05-01-2008, 05:07 PM
I couldn't agree more. You can't beat the Haggis.
Actually, you CAN beat the Haggis. But it's not usually done "in company"... :D

Billy T
05-01-2008, 05:15 PM
Why do people make such a big deal over the simple act of frying sausages? I make sure they are thawed properly (if previously frozen) then I fry on low heat turning three times, once for each side after the first side is nicely browned. When the last side is brown, they are cooked right through every time.

If you are really paranoid you can pre-heat in a microwave on low for 2-3 minutes just to get them started but I've never bothered. Just buy decent sausages, not the Mad Butcher or other cheap supermarket rubbish.

I've been through a few meat plants and the contents of some sausages are little better than dog tucker. There are a couple of well known brands that I would never eat again after being in their processing plants. :yuck: Conversely I've been in pet food plants that had better hygiene standards and smelt better too!

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

johcar
05-01-2008, 05:25 PM
Why do people make such a big deal over the simple act of frying sausages? I make sure they are thawed properly (if previously frozen) then I fry on low heat turning three times, once for each side after the first side is nicely browned. When the last side is brown, they are cooked right through every time.

If you are really paranoid you can pre-heat in a microwave on low for 2-3 minutes just to get them started but I've never bothered. Just buy decent sausages, not the Mad Butcher or other cheap supermarket rubbish.

I've been through a few meat plants and the contents of some sausages are little better than dog tucker. There are a couple of well known brands that I would never eat again after being in their processing plants. :yuck: Conversely I've been in pet food plants that had better hygiene standards and smelt better too!

Cheers

Billy 8-{)Hey no fair, Billy! How about naming names rather than letting us unknowingly eat offal....???

pctek
05-01-2008, 05:37 PM
And whats wrong with offal? No different to cheeks and lungs that go into pies.
Its not poisonous you know.

johcar
05-01-2008, 06:18 PM
Yeah, I know it's all meat, but it's just the thought of it! :yuck:

(I eat about one pie a year now since my bypass in 2004! A treat!)

bob_doe_nz
05-01-2008, 07:57 PM
Yeah, I know it's all meat, but it's just the thought of it! :yuck:

(I eat about one pie a year now since my bypass in 2004! A treat!)

Make your own pies.

1 kg of lean beef mince
2 onions finely diced
Around half a bag of plain frozen mixed veges. 500gm - 1kg (No fancy mix)
2-3 half waxy half floury potatoes finely diced
2 carrots finely diced

2-3 packets of Maggi Oxtail soup mix
Water
Lea & Perrins Worcester Sauce
Salt & Pepper to season.

Brown mince in batches, breaking clumps.

Sautee onion in oil till soft. Add mince, all the veges. Mix soup mix with some water till slurry like. Add to pot. Add enough water till it's about an inch or so from the top. Add about 40mL's of Worcester.

Bring to boil, taste and add more Worcester if need be (Needs a light tang) And simmer for about 1.5 to 2 hours. Stirring occasionally.

When done, add seasoning. Thicken with cornflour / Potato Starch mixed with cold water.

Serve...

On toast
In toast
In pies
With Mash


Feeds 5-8 people.

Billy T
05-01-2008, 09:30 PM
Hey no fair, Billy! How about naming names rather than letting us unknowingly eat offal....???

It's not what they put in that bothers me, it's the hygiene conditions, or lack thereof. I can't name names or I'd breach client confidentiality, but one non-client I can point to from end user experience has huge amounts of sinew and gristle in some of their traditional/old english type sausages.

I wrote to them and was ignored until I contacted the senior management, who then gave me a snow job about their quality despite my sending photos of this sinew-like (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Heller-1.jpg) non-meat material found in this (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Heller-2.jpg) product.

Think what you will, and make decisions accordingly.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

plod
05-01-2008, 10:31 PM
It's not what they put in that bothers me, it's the hygiene conditions, or lack thereof. I can't name names or I'd breach client confidentiality, but one non-client I can point to from end user experience has huge amounts of sinew and gristle in some of their traditional/old english type sausages.

I wrote to them and was ignored until I contacted the senior management, who then gave me a snow job about their quality despite my sending photos of this sinew-like (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Heller-1.jpg) non-meat material found in this (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/Heller-2.jpg) product.

Think what you will, and make decisions accordingly.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Thanks Billy:mad: They were one of the nicer snarlers at the supermarket

Marnie
05-01-2008, 10:41 PM
The ultimate sausage of course is a haggis, and anyone who says they don't like it hasn't had a good one ( accompanied by a wee or large dram of the best of Scotland) Yum yum again. :p
I had haggis several years ago in Scotland (I think it was Stirling). It was great value, I had it again and again and again!!

Greg
05-01-2008, 11:24 PM
Haggis? It must be the lowest form of sub-edible thing known to mankind. I think I'd rather eat monkey flesh than that kind of shizza!