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Stassie
27-11-2007, 07:31 AM
My husband and I would like to put a keylogger on our computer. (The reasons for which are a long story, but involve monitoring my not-quite-so-honest younger sisterís use of our computer).

I donít know the first thing about computers, really. Iím assuming there arenít any legal issues with putting such a logger on your own computer. So my question is, how do you do this? I know there is software you can download, but am reluctant to do so, in case I download something nasty while Iím at it. Would this be a correct assumption?

If this is the case, is there any Ďsafeí way of doing this easily? Iím happy to spend a little money if necessary, given that Ďfreeí software looks dodgy.

Thanks very much for your advice.

timmy101
27-11-2007, 07:48 AM
A safe keylogger would be Ardamax Keylogger 2.8 (Your antivirus may delete a build feature) but everything else is very easy

jermsie
27-11-2007, 08:30 AM
My husband and I would like to put a keylogger on our computer. (The reasons for which are a long story, but involve monitoring my not-quite-so-honest younger sisterís use of our computer).

I donít know the first thing about computers, really. Iím assuming there arenít any legal issues with putting such a logger on your own computer. So my question is, how do you do this? I know there is software you can download, but am reluctant to do so, in case I download something nasty while Iím at it. Would this be a correct assumption?

If this is the case, is there any Ďsafeí way of doing this easily? Iím happy to spend a little money if necessary, given that Ďfreeí software looks dodgy.

Thanks very much for your advice.

What you're doing is dodgy but I won't question your motives.
Hmm could be interesting with an anti-virus

wainuitech
27-11-2007, 08:46 AM
Most antivirus and antispyware programs detect keyloggers these days as part of their security - you may have problems running one.

Speedy Gonzales
27-11-2007, 08:50 AM
There are also dongles you can buy, that are keyloggers.

Which are hardware not sw based. AV programs wouldnt pick these up.

Dont know if these are available in NZ tho, if this is where you are.

Cant say I've seen one.

nerd
27-11-2007, 09:48 AM
what is a keylogger?
dos it find out passswords and what thay have been doing on the computer?

Speedy Gonzales
27-11-2007, 09:52 AM
what is a keylogger?

Does it find out passwords and what they have been doing on the computer?

You got it. Thats what it does.

And if you bank online and something from somewhere has installed one, you're in trouble.

If you dont know its there.

nerd
27-11-2007, 09:59 AM
why would you want one unless ur a hard-out hacker or want to drain money out of peoples bank accounts?

Speedy Gonzales
27-11-2007, 10:11 AM
I dont know like the first post says.

Altho, if you dont think she's honest, why let her on it, in the first place?

Either put a password on it, or dont let her use it / on it.

Use some common sense. If she didnt buy it and didnt put anything towards the computer, do something about it.

Kick her off it.

Or if you know what she's doing (and what sites she's gong to), get a program that can block the sites (and put a password in it).

Then she wont be able to go there.

Stassie
27-11-2007, 10:13 AM
Thank you everyone for your advice, I really appreciate it. I'm working on comprehending it :)


why would you want one unless ur a hard-out hacker or want to drain money out of peoples bank accounts?

In my case, to have an accurate record of what your computer is being used for, and to take action to prevent it being used in an inappropriate way if necessary.

I can see how these things could be very dangerous in the wrong hands and used in inappropriate ways. As I said before, we're working on the assumption there's nothing illegal about installing them on your own computer. (I'm assuming that installing them on someone elses computer could get you into an aweful lot of trouble!)

Greg
27-11-2007, 10:30 AM
Installing a logger on your own computer is completely lawful. But if it's used on the Internet on someone else's ISP account then it's questionable.

So yeah you have good reason to ask for advice. Just be careful which software product you choose - there's more than a hint of nefariousness to monitoring other people's computer use, and a lot of software sellers are themselves nefarious. Particularly in the area you're looking at.

Having said that, I would question your motives for actually considering this, given that you're not exactly open yourself about why you want to monitor your "sister's" computer use. And the question could be asked why you would even bring up the point about installing a logger on someone else's computer if that's supposedly not your intention?

Stassie
27-11-2007, 10:57 AM
Thank you for your comments. They are very much appreciated.

You mentioned that I havenít been exactly open about my reasons for wanting install this, which is a fair comment. Obviously, Iím not going to bare all over the internet, but I did feel a little further explanation might be helpful.

Basically, my teenage sister has been through a bit of a tough patch, and has moved near us with the intention of leaving the past behind and getting her life back on track. While she doesnít live at our place, she treats it as a second home, which I encourage. We did agree on some boundaries, though, before I gave her the key. The use of our computer was one of these. I have strong reasons to suspect that sheís not sticking to her side of the bargain. Iíve talked to her about this, and she is adamant that she is. Although sheís been deceptive in the past, I donít want to risk the relationship weíre building back by signalling that I donít trust her by not allowing her access to the computer, or changing the password. *Rock* Me *Hard Place* For now, Iím really just looking into options.

Please rest assured that I have no nefarious intentionsÖ unless you consider my current dilemma to fall under this category.

pctek
27-11-2007, 11:50 AM
Although sheís been deceptive in the past, I donít want to risk the relationship weíre building back by signalling that I donít trust her by not allowing her access to the computer, or changing the password. .

Then going behind her back and installing a keylogger is crazy.
Why don't you just look at the History in IE?

Greg
27-11-2007, 12:16 PM
Thank you for your comments. They are very much appreciated.

You mentioned that I havenít been exactly open about my reasons for wanting install this, which is a fair comment. Obviously, Iím not going to bare all over the internet, but I did feel a little further explanation might be helpful.

Basically, my teenage sister has been through a bit of a tough patch, and has moved near us with the intention of leaving the past behind and getting her life back on track. While she doesnít live at our place, she treats it as a second home, which I encourage. We did agree on some boundaries, though, before I gave her the key. The use of our computer was one of these. I have strong reasons to suspect that sheís not sticking to her side of the bargain. Iíve talked to her about this, and she is adamant that she is. Although sheís been deceptive in the past, I donít want to risk the relationship weíre building back by signalling that I donít trust her by not allowing her access to the computer, or changing the password. *Rock* Me *Hard Place* For now, Iím really just looking into options.

Please rest assured that I have no nefarious intentionsÖ unless you consider my current dilemma to fall under this category.

Stassie - I can suggest a software tool for you. But I'd like to think about an option... tell your sister that you're monitoring your computer usage, and that anything that's done on the PC is visible to you. That way it clears up any undue blame on either part. If you want a link to a free and reliable piece of software to do the job, let me know via PM (private message) - I prefer not to give out the link in public.

bachelorno1
27-11-2007, 12:51 PM
In my case, to have an accurate record of what your computer is being used for, and to take action to prevent it being used in an inappropriate way if necessary.

What about some 'parental control' software like Net Nanny (https://www.netnanny.com/products/netnanny), I believe they offer a 2 week free trial.
I have never used Net Nanny myself but know people who do; it blocks websites and searches, report on sites visited, and monitor instant messaging...

bob_doe_nz
27-11-2007, 04:16 PM
Why don't you just look at the History in IE?

You'd be suprised how much of the younger generation know more than the parents :xmouth:

And yes, I have used a keylogger program. I used it to add blocklisted words for my router.

Speedy Gonzales
27-11-2007, 04:24 PM
I think Avast Home can block sites ( I know Pro can).

I think both have a password option (I think this is to get into the protection control option). This will stop anyone from changing the settings.

robsonde
27-11-2007, 05:03 PM
http://www.keyghost.co.nz/nz_orders.htm

TGoddard
27-11-2007, 11:41 PM
I am not a lawyer but I can see some serious risks in doing anything like this. While it isn't illegal to install monitoring software on your computer, collecting information about your sister's use of it without informing her could constitute a serious privacy violation.

Collection of personal information must be necessary, must be obtained directly from the individual with their consent if possible and regardless of means of collection they must be informed unless it would jeopardise the purpose of collection. I'm afraid to tell you that simply owning the machine does not give you any right to monitor your sister's activities without her consent.

While I'm aware that the situation is probably very difficult, monitoring a person's activities without their knowledge should be a last resort approach. Installing a key logger could be considered a serious breach of trust. Even aside from the legal implications to deal with any issues discovered you would have to reveal your monitoring activities.

I would recommend using some form of non-recording parental management software if possible. If you have to collect any information I would fully disclose what is being collected, why it is being monitored and how long it will be retained. Any attempt to circumvent protection measures should lead to access to the computer being removed and this should be stated up front. Setting strictly enforced rules about the use of your equipment is legally and morally sound. Secretive monitoring is shaky on both grounds.

Chilling_Silence
27-11-2007, 11:53 PM
First off, what are you worried about her doing thats breaching your trust? Visiting Porn sites? Downloading illegal software? Chatting with people via MSN / ICQ / whatever that she used to associate with?

All respect due to the people who've offered suggestions but they're all very broad and easily foolable solutions so far.

If you were to let us know specifically what you were wanting to monitor (Such as Browser history or MSN chats) then we can assist further. Otherwise you could completely miss the boat...