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View Full Version : Installing a wifi router into a home network... Cnet router wont work



Cornot
08-11-2007, 06:36 PM
Hi all,
I recently acquired a new laptop, and wanting to be able to surf the net wirelessly suddenly gained new priority.

here is my network atm:

--(MODEM/Router)-->(Wall)-->(Desktop/Laptop via ethernet)

The network works fine without the wireless router installed. But when i connect the Cable from the modem into the WAN socket, and my Laptop into one of the LAN ports, the internet will not come through. Therefore it is the routers problem. I can see my desktop on the network (Connected to the same router) but no other computers connected to the Modems LAN Ports.

I have a Dynalink RTA-1335 Modem and a CNet CWR-854 wireless Router. It must be a settings thing but i cant for the life of me figure out what it is :(

Posted below are screenshots of the WAN and LAN configurations I have at the moment. Who ever solves this will be worshipped as a god.

LAN:
http://img181.imageshack.us/img181/9905/lanya0.png (http://imageshack.us)

WAN DHCP:
http://img253.imageshack.us/img253/4848/wandhcpbh3.png (http://imageshack.us)

WAN PPPoE:
http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/3315/wanpppoeyw3.png (http://imageshack.us)

WAN STATIC IP:
http://img253.imageshack.us/img253/9287/wanstaticdh1.png (http://imageshack.us)

I know very little when it comes to networking, the modem connects via PPPoE to Slingshot so the router would just need to redirect the connection right?

Thankyou very much,

Greg

Edit: Sorry about the large image files

Erayd
08-11-2007, 06:59 PM
If you still can, I would take that router back and swap it for a different brand - those ones have truly lousy performance whan using encryption (think 5MBits/sec or less).

Cornot
08-11-2007, 07:14 PM
If you still can, I would take that router back and swap it for a different brand - those ones have truly lousy performance whan using encryption (think 5MBits/sec or less).

true? Not even for casual browsing? I brought this as part of a deal i struck with a family member, i'll ask for the receipt to swap it if i can.


thanks, does anyone have any suggestions for another cheap wifi router that is preferrably idiot proof?

Erayd
08-11-2007, 07:23 PM
For casual browsing it'll be fine, but don't try and stream high quality video over it, or copy large files between computers etc.

Cornot
08-11-2007, 07:28 PM
tbh thats all im expecting from it, i'll try it out. And return it if its unsatisfactory. Thanks Bletch
however, can someone help me with configuring this?

also apparantly Bletch its your birthday... happy bday :)

MushHead
08-11-2007, 08:48 PM
Dunno much about your RTA-1335, but your basic CNet setup should be something like the RTA-1335's. The typical factory config for a router is to have dynamic (aka DHCP client) setting on the WAN port, then have DHCP server mode enabled on the LAN ports. If you set the CNet router up like that, then your PC's should get their IP addresses off the CNet router, just like they do (now?) off your Dynalink router. The CNet router will get a dynamic WAN IP off the Dynalink. You should set up DNS forwarding on both, so that DNS requests are forwarded through both routers to your ISP's DNS servers.

The ONE thing you have to make sure of is that the Dynalink LAN subnet is different from the CNet's LAN subnet! So if your Dynalink is 192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0, you can choose 192.168.0.1/255.255.255.0 for the CNet. Any other 192.168.x.0 subnet will do, as long as the netmask is as above. You could also use 10.x.x.x/255.0.0.0, there's literally millions of possibilities in there if you use more restrictive subnets (those examples are in the special non-routable ranges reserved for LAN addresses), but hopefully you get the idea.

If you have firewall problems, you should probably disable the Dynalink firewall & let the CNet one handle all firewalling duty. If you want to do VPN, well, then I'm not your man.

Misty
09-11-2007, 07:56 AM
I am no expert at all, not like MushHead seems to be. However I can tell you of my own experience. I had an existing modem and bought a wireless router to add. Unfortunately I could not get it working and after getting my local PC shop to come to my place and spend 1 1/2 hours on it I was told it was a compatibility issue. I changed the Belkin router I had bought for a Dynalink modem/router and all was fine. It seems to make sense to use one unit to carry out the functions instead of two.

If exchanging the unit is an option that may be the way to go, however I don't know anything more about the degree of complexity in getting your two existing units to work (co-exist ?).

Words from an amateur
Misty :2cents:

iwalmsley
09-11-2007, 11:43 AM
The easiest way, is to turn off all routing capabilities on the 802.11 router.
No DHCP, no DNS, no firewall, nothing. Just use it as a wireless bridge.
Then make sure your aDSL router is connect to a LAN port on the wireless bridge, not your WAN port.
Give your wireless bridge a static IP, then make sure the DHCP server on your aDSL router is configured with an IP pool excluding the known static ones.
For eg.
aDSL router = 192.168.1.1
Wireless bridge = 192.168.1.2
DHCP pool = 192.168.1.3 - 192.168.1.255

There is no point setting both up as routers with an empty subnet in the middle, as you just make things much more complicated for no extra benefit. Now every device has only 1 IP address inside your house, and your aDSL router has 1 IP address on the Internet.

Cornot
09-11-2007, 03:21 PM
ok thanks all, i'll have another go at it tonight, will post results.
Thanks iwalmsley, Misty, MushHead and Bletch

Cornot
10-11-2007, 02:44 PM
Ok its working now, just had to change the Default Gateway to my Wireless routers address. Now i'm typing wirelessly. Its all secured and works pretty good.

Thanks all, greatly appreciated.