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View Full Version : Difference between single, duo and quad cores



Serpi
30-10-2007, 05:58 PM
Can i please have a simple (!!!!!) definition of what duo and quad cores do? I have googled and come up with mostly company blurbs which do not answer my question at all.

winmacguy
30-10-2007, 06:28 PM
Duo core is 2 cpu cores on one silicon dye - which is effectively 2 processors for one machine
Quad core is 4 cpu cores om one silicon dye - which is effectively 4 processors for one machine and in a Dual Quad core machine that would be 8 processors.

Ideal for multitasking and running cooler and more efficiently- get more stuff done faster with less effort . Good for gaming but mostly good for Video, graphics, and AutoCAD stuff.

Deane F
30-10-2007, 07:37 PM
Can i please have a simple (!!!!!) definition of what duo and quad cores do? I have googled and come up with mostly company blurbs which do not answer my question at all.

An application (computer program) sends instructions (threads) to the processor to be executed. A dual or quad core processor can execute the threads in parallel - ie: for each clock cycle, at least two (or four for a quad core) threads are being executed.

It is important to note that applications must be written to take full advantage of multiple core processors - but it is most definitely the future of computing and eventually all applications will be written in this way.

The speed at which processors could be made to run hit a wall a few years ago. The multi-core CPUs and their architecture are a response to this.

MushHead
30-10-2007, 09:03 PM
It is important to note that applications must be written to take full advantage of multiple core processors - but it is most definitely the future of computing and eventually all applications will be written in this way.

Bear in mind that your average PC running Windows (or, dare I say it, a Mac [sorry Pete]) normally has a large number of processes idling around waiting to do work, or doing stuff in the background (eg drivers, antivirus), so even though not many apps are multi-core aware, there's always something to put those extra cores to work, so you'll probably notice that work proceeds more smoothly because the foreground app doesn't necessarily have to relinquish as much CPU time as in a uniprocessor situation.

Metla
30-10-2007, 09:34 PM
I dare say anyone would struggle to identify which PC had a multiple-core cpu in her.

My two rigs, a single core 3500 and a dual core 4600 run pretty much the same. If anything the 4600 stalls when it does heavy access to the harddrive, and thats a sata drive.

anyway, to the thread starter. In simple terms

A cpu is an engine, Dual core just means 2 engines, Hooked upto the same crankshaft as it were.

Sweep
30-10-2007, 10:01 PM
Has any person noted that Serpi, like Elvis, has left the room?

Also Serpi failed to explain any more.

What is you actual question Serpi?

Welcome to PressF1.

Pete O'Neil
30-10-2007, 10:03 PM
dare I say it, a Mac [sorry Pete])
No problems with Macs MushHead ;) by all accounts they make a very good OS and use very good hardware.

Sweep
30-10-2007, 10:07 PM
I also wonder about dye as opposed to die. And I do not mean dead when I say die.

beeswax34
30-10-2007, 10:16 PM
Google Time!

Dual Core: This refers to a new Central Processing Unit (CPU) structure. The difference between a single core and dual core is that a dual core system has two CPU's that are electronically wired together. These two CPU's wired together in parallel gives twice the performance than that of its single core counterpart.

A multi-core CPU (or chip-level multiprocessor, CMP) combines two or more independent cores into a single package composed of a single integrated circuit (IC), called a die, or more dies packaged together. A dual-core processor contains two cores and a quad-core processor contains four cores. A multi-core microprocessor implements multiprocessing in a single physical package.