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Cicero
12-07-2007, 08:48 AM
Just bought a Inverter micro wave.
I know it starts with less of a bang,but what is an INVERTER?

ronyville
12-07-2007, 09:16 AM
Possibly one of those really cheap crappy brand names :D

sam m
12-07-2007, 09:27 AM
It was explained to me a different type of power technology. In traditional machines when you set the power to say 50%, it actually still performs at 100% but only 1/2 the time, the remaining 1/2 there is no power (although I think it does it in spurts of power but I dont really know, or care). The inverter is supposedly a true 50% power reduction.

Cicero
12-07-2007, 09:51 AM
Thanks Rony and Sam.

Right about crappy brand..........Panasonic.

Like you say Sam,who cares.

Trev
12-07-2007, 10:28 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inverter_(electrical)
Trevor :)

Cicero
12-07-2007, 11:14 AM
Thanks Rony and Sam.

Right about crappy brand..........Panasonic.

Like you say Sam,who cares.

I should mention I care,hence the question.

Cicero
12-07-2007, 07:24 PM
I should mention I care,hence the question.

Will know one enlighten us.?

godfather
12-07-2007, 07:55 PM
Traditional microvaves use a bulky 50 Hz transformer to convert the 230 volts to the high voltages needed for the magnetron (the gizmo the produces the microwaves). Very heavy, lots of copper but extremely simple and reliable.

An "Inverter" converts the incoming mains to DC, then electronically switches that to a much smaller transformer (because the switched frequency is several thousand Hz, less copper and iron is needed) to produce the high voltage.

Hence less of a "thump" when turning on (the turn on can also be made slow in electronics) and also you should have noticed that the weight is less. You also notice a similar weight loss in your wallet, due to the higher costs of the technology.

Apart from that the outcome is the same, in terms of cooking.
But in an inverter microwave, the power level can be lowered in a linear manner, whereas in a non inverter type it is on-off at intervals to lower the effective power.

Rob99
12-07-2007, 08:05 PM
http://www2.panasonic.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/InvertorExplained?storeId=15001&catalogId=13401&catGroupId=25071

Sounds like a cool idea, but who would use 50% power anyway?

tweak'e
12-07-2007, 08:12 PM
also the less weight due to the lightweight inverter means less cost in shipping etc.

downside is there are some comman faults with them and they do die a lot quicker.

Cicero
12-07-2007, 08:28 PM
Traditional microvaves use a bulky 50 Hz transformer to convert the 230 volts to the high voltages needed for the magnetron (the gizmo the produces the microwaves). Very heavy, lots of copper but extremely simple and reliable.

An "Inverter" converts the incoming mains to DC, then electronically switches that to a much smaller transformer (because the switched frequency is several thousand Hz, less copper and iron is needed) to produce the high voltage.

Hence less of a "thump" when turning on (the turn on can also be made slow in electronics) and also you should have noticed that the weight is less. You also notice a similar weight loss in your wallet, due to the higher costs of the technology.

Apart from that the outcome is the same, in terms of cooking.
But in an inverter microwave, the power level can be lowered in a linear manner, whereas in a non inverter type it is on-off at intervals to lower the effective power.

Thanks for that.
Not clear what the advantage is,less cost to run perhaps.

Not heard that they don't last as long b4?

zqwerty
12-07-2007, 08:36 PM
The more complicated a machine is, in general, the sooner it breaks down, bad luck Cicero, ha ha.

K.I.S.S. keep it simple stupid.

Trev
12-07-2007, 08:43 PM
Most heat pumps are inverter types, but be careful buying cheap ones from the Warehouse etc, because as far as I know they don't have inverters.
Trevor :)

Cicero
12-07-2007, 09:30 PM
The more complicated a machine is, in general, the sooner it breaks down, bad luck Cicero, ha ha.

K.I.S.S. keep it simple stupid.
Take my word for it Zq there is less stress with Inverter and therefore much longer life is expected.

Watch this kissing stuff,we might begin to suspect puffterism.

zqwerty
12-07-2007, 09:49 PM
I knew you would take the bait, C.

robbyp
13-07-2007, 01:58 PM
also the less weight due to the lightweight inverter means less cost in shipping etc.

downside is there are some comman faults with them and they do die a lot quicker.


Yes, my panasonic inverter microwave died after only 2 years, due to the magnatron dying (made in china). Retailer said that they aren't made like they used to be made. I would recommend another brand.

Trev
13-07-2007, 02:05 PM
I still use a Mitsubishi Cube Microwave oven purchased in 1987. Still going strong. Quite pricey in those days, about $800 for a 750 watt MW oven.
Trevor :)

Graham L
13-07-2007, 05:01 PM
A magnetron wouldn't die prematurely just because it has an inverter supply. It would die because it's at the short end of the failure curve.

Doesn't everyone know that all magnetrons are made in the northern hemisphere? Of course you need an inverter to make them work in the southern hemisphere. :cool:

pine-o-cleen
13-07-2007, 08:35 PM
An inverter microwave is like a regular microwave except the microwave radiation is on the outside instead of the inside. So you put things you want to cook next to the microwave. :D :p

R2x1
13-07-2007, 09:14 PM
Ask Chill about inverter microwaves

Cicero
13-07-2007, 09:20 PM
Ask Chill about inverter microwaves

You ask him.