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Bryan
23-04-2007, 08:59 PM
I would like to try Linux but to set it up in its own partition on a HDD.

However, I went down this track once before, disasteriously. I was warned that the setup would delete everything on the HDD and sure enough it did.

My question is, how do I add Linux to its own partition without interfering with the other operating sytems that I might have on the HDD?

Jen
23-04-2007, 09:24 PM
If Linux deleted everything on the hard drive and warned you about this, you must of selected the entire hard drive for it to install on.

There are a couple of ways to avoid that mistake again. The easiest way is to get another hard drive and install it into a removable drive caddy: Example (http://www.dse.co.nz/cgi-bin/dse.storefront/en/product/XH5067). You will need a spare second caddy tray as well for the Windows hard drive. By installing your Windows and Linux hard drives into these caddies, you will be physically swapping one to boot the other. Neither can overwrite or damage the other operating system.

The other way is to partition the drive first and leave it unformatted. When installing Linux allow it to use the free unallocated space. Make sure you double check all the prompts to ensure you have selected the correct parition.

As with all things, there will always be a risk that good things go bad so do make sure you have anything important backed up first. :)

What distro are you planning to install?

Chilling_Silence
23-04-2007, 10:21 PM
*Chilling_Silence votes for un-partitioned space.

Better safe than sorry, do a backup ;)

Faded_Mantis
24-04-2007, 03:38 AM
I've used Linux both on a seperate HDD to XP and in a seperate partition on the XP HDD, both worked fine for me. Used partition magic to make the partition before installing Linux.

Myth
24-04-2007, 06:32 AM
I've used Linux both on a seperate HDD to XP and in a seperate partition on the XP HDD, both worked fine for me. Used partition magic to make the partition before installing Linux.Note: Partition Magic can have some issues I have discovered, where resizing will actually give a horrible error which in the end means you have to wipe the drive completely (or use another app to recover)

Always backup before installing another OS, or playing with partitioning

If you can find an old 5 or 10 gig drive and have the space to mount it, connect that, and install Linux to that drive

Besides; after 5 or so installs you soon figure out exactly what the installers require and how they work :p

beama
24-04-2007, 06:36 AM
there is another way
download vmpalyer (free)
go download a premade linux virtual machine, (fordora 6, I downloaded) links are on the vm site

The only disadvantage with this method the virtual machine may need some configuring in my case I had to fiddle with the screen settings and dhcp settings.

But I also have dual boot laptop xp and redhat 9 on same disk different partitions.

Proberly the safest way woul be to contact your Local lug (linux user group) and see if they have an install fest planned or in very least advise you on this proposed install.

Both chills and jens methods will work

the main thing is before trying any of this is BACKUP

Myth
24-04-2007, 07:11 AM
there is another way
download vmpalyer (free)
go download a premade linux virtual machine, (fordora 6, I downloaded) links are on the vm site

The only disadvantage with this method the virtual machine may need some configuring in my case I had to fiddle with the screen settings and dhcp settings.

But I also have dual boot laptop xp and redhat 9 on same disk different partitions.

Proberly the safest way woul be to contact your Local lug (linux user group) and see if they have an install fest planned or in very least advise you on this proposed install.

Both chills and jens methods will work

the main thing is before trying any of this is BACKUPVMPlayer :D
And yes, this is another option and probably the easiest

Chilling_Silence
24-04-2007, 07:47 AM
Speaking of Virtual Images, Ive had some fun recently with Virtual PC... broke it very well :D

Yeah a lot of linux distros are pretty happy to run under VMWare or whatever its called these days, but not so much Virtual PC.

Im sure if you told us your rough general area (Southern Hemisphere is too broad, 'Auckland, North Shore' is good), somebody here from your area might be able to assist with doing the install in-person if you're really worried about your data?

procosm
24-04-2007, 10:49 AM
What version of linux is it? I know a few versions I have tried give the option of manually setting up the HD. You just have to look for it during setup. Or it might have the option to allow setup on unused disc space.

procosm
24-04-2007, 10:52 AM
What version of linux is it? I know a few versions I have tried give the option of manually setting up the HD. You just have to look for it during setup. Or it might have the option to allow setup on unused disc space.

Sorry I din not see all the other replies so this may already have been covered.

Brooko
24-04-2007, 10:53 AM
Hi Bryan,
Like you I wanted to try Linux - and see what the hype was about (I'm still an avid learner - only using it for 3 months). My suggestion (if you haven't already) is to try a live-CD first, have a play around, and then go the step further once you're sure you want to go to HD installation.

Based on own experience - would recommend you try Mepis (www.mepis.org) Live CD. Their unofficial catch phrase "it just works" - basically for me worked without hassles of hardware configuration. I've tried quite a few distros now - even new Kubuntu 7.04 - and just switched back to Mepis again.

As long as you have time, download a few CD's - try other distros - but if you start with the live CDs you can at least try and find something that should work with your hardware specs. Try distro-watch to see the live CDs available. For me Mepis was the 'standout'.

If you want to make a dual boot (hd install) after you've experimented a bit with the live CD, (if you use Mepis) you can actually install off the live CD. Some others give this option as well (Kubuntu is one of them).

I didn't try repartitioning my drive in the end (was worried about losing XP) - so just bought & installed 2nd HD drive (for safety sake). Then followed the instructions for installation making sure it was installed on 2nd hard drive (hdb). Other nice thing about having 2 drives with Mepis is that from Linux I can easily access (and write to) the windows drive. Good for backing up files while I've been playing around with other distros.

Hope this helps.

Bryan
24-04-2007, 12:11 PM
Thank you Brooko, and everyone else who took the time to reply. I at least feel a little more comfortable now. Thanks again.

Graham L
24-04-2007, 03:11 PM
Just take your time, and make sure you are sure before you push the "OK" button. :D

If there is an unallocated partition, Linux installers will always ask if you want to use that. They will never delete and overwrite a partition which is in use by another OS, unless they are told to do that, by a "sure" user. (There is one exception ... some of the dedicated firewall packages assume they own the hardware ... but Linus OS installations are careful).