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View Full Version : EMI to sell DRM-free music



Chris Keall
03-04-2007, 11:40 AM
It's the ultimate anti-piracy measure: sell a product your customers will find easy to use. Details here (http://pcworld.co.nz/pcworld/pcw.nsf/feature/EF2CA68FFA71E979CC2572B10076FA86).

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 08:11 PM
Just waiting for the rest of the music industry to jump on board. Apparently the changes will come into effect in May 2007.
The tracks from iTunes will be playable on ALL MP3 players that support the AAC format straight away.

bob_doe_nz
03-04-2007, 08:48 PM
Just waiting for the rest of the music industry to jump on board. Apparently the changes will come into effect in May 2007.
The tracks from iTunes will be playable on ALL MP3 players that support the AAC format straight away.

Aha! Steve Jobs can't do it to himself he's yet to make ITunes DRM free.

I can imagine if Itunes became DRM free. :eek:

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 08:56 PM
You should try reading the article:rolleyes: The DRM was originally put on tunes purchased from the iTunes store at the specific request of the music companies - NOT Apple . Steve has always wanted to sell music cheaply and without restrictions to customers.

"Apple and EMI today revealed plans to introduce high-quality 256k music downloads free of DRM restrictions as a top tier option through iTunes – and other digital music services – worldwide.

The impact of this is that any iTunes customer will be able to play tracks they buy through the service on any device, platform or music player. It also means users of other devices will be able to buy their music from iTunes – at least, if it comes from EMI.

The announcement began with a live performance from Damon Albarn’s latest outfit, The Good, The Bad and The Queen. The EMI band immediately began offering its latest album as high-quality DRM-free downloads for sale through its website (using technology from 7 Digital).

Freedom and simplicity

EMI CEO Eric Nicoli took the stage to announce his company's plan to offer unrestricted high-quality music to music fans – the company will make its entire catalogue of music available this way.

EMI's online retail partners are being offered the chance to offer downloads of tracks and albums in the DRM-free audio format of their choice in a variety of bit rates up to CD quality.

Nicoli said, "Our goal is to give consumers the best possible digital music experience. By providing DRM-free downloads, we aim to address the lack of interoperability which is frustrating for many music fans. We believe that offering consumers the opportunity to buy higher quality tracks and listen to them on the device or platform of their choice will boost sales of digital music."

He revealed recent research conducted on behalf of his company which suggests 84 per cent of online music customers would be happy to pay more for higher-quality tracks without DRM restrictions.

"Our experience shows us that higher-quality tracks outsell low-quality downloads by a factor of ten to one," Nicoli added. "Today, EMI and Apple are announcing the next big movement in the digital marketplace. The move away from DRM."

May release for DRM-free iTunes

The EMI chief was joined onstage by Apple CEO, Steve Jobs, who confirmed that Apple will sell EMI tracks in the new unrestricted format starting in May. The company will also continue to sell music from the label in the current DRM-protected format: "Consumers now have a choice," Jobs explained, "we don't want to take anything away from our service."

In a nice touch, iTunes customers who have previously purchased and downloaded music from an EMI artist will be able to upgrade their songs to the new DRM-free format for just 20-pence per track. Customers will be able to set iTunes up to automatically upgrade purchased tracks.

EMI music videos will also be made available without rights protection. Asked if he could visualise film and TV shows being made available without rights restriction, Jobs pointed out that the film industry has never really sold its products in anything other than a proprietary format. "Music and film are very different," Jobs implied. "

paulw
04-04-2007, 09:29 AM
If the price in the NZ Herald this morning is anything to go by UK99 Pence = NZ$2.72 then it's dead in the water as far as I'm concerned..

Safari
04-04-2007, 09:47 AM
If the price in the NZ Herald this morning is anything to go by UK99 Pence = NZ$2.72 then it's dead in the water as far as I'm concerned..

Have another look, 99 euro cents for each download, compared with the 79 British pence paid by UK residents.
0.99 EUR = 1.83424 NZD

paulw
04-04-2007, 01:20 PM
Have another look, 99 euro cents for each download, compared with the 79 British pence paid by UK residents.
0.99 EUR = 1.83424 NZD

No you look again at page A13 of todays Herald. 99P ($2.72)

winmacguy
04-04-2007, 06:39 PM
91 ZM is doing an iTunes 200 song giveaway each hour of Easter weekend. You can't argue with FREE.

With regards to the new iTunes pricing scheme with 256kbps quality- if you don't like it then buy CDs or get your music from a different online music store.

Tukapa
04-04-2007, 06:43 PM
Or P2P until they finally realise their pricing is the one thing doing them out of legal downlaods and purchases.

winmacguy
04-04-2007, 06:48 PM
Just spotted this news article relating to online music pricing

EU says record firms force iTunes to limit access
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Major record companies are forcing Apple (NasdaqGS:AAPL - News) to curtail access to iTunes online stores across borders, leading to higher prices and less choice, the European Commission said on Tuesday.

The EU executive sent formal charges to Apple and the major record companies last week because consumers can only buy iTunes in their own countries and cannot shop around for cheaper prices and a broader catalogue in other states.

"Our current view is that this is an arrangement which is imposed on Apple by the major record companies and we do not see a justification for it," Commission spokesman Jonathan Todd told reporters.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rb/070403/apple_eu.html

paulw
05-04-2007, 09:26 AM
I think thats been known for a while and is the reason that NZ Itunes has limited acces to tracks and no access to TV programs..