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PedalSlammer
24-03-2007, 08:43 PM
Any advise for a Noob Technician? I mean how can I be a better technician? Is it by experience? I mean I really want to pass the CompTIA A+ once and since it so expensive it is not worth losing and not pass it.
Do you guys it'll be worth it to start to service other computers with customers? :confused: I mean I want a better experience and I don't really know how. Because the PC I'm using sheldom toss any problems for me now, so I can't get a good experience with all sorts of problems.
lol, maybe a little extra cash for my new PC since my allowance is so low.
Thanks in advance.

trinsic
24-03-2007, 09:04 PM
Offer family and friends free service. But beware you might get bogged down :P

(well I offered 2 years ago and I'm still 'the one' so to speak)

PedalSlammer
24-03-2007, 09:16 PM
Offer family and friends free service. But beware you might get bogged down :P

(well I offered 2 years ago and I'm still 'the one' so to speak) Family(I don't have cousins, aunt, uncles, and all that but most of the computers in my house is working fine) & Friends?
Bogged down? I already solve all the problems in my home computers. i.e. I'm using a HDD with bad sector too which is not advisable because it's too tight for my budget to spend $100 since my new PC is costing $$$. And since the HDD is pretty slow and laggy but I still manage to use fine but not for lots of data storage anyway.
By the way I've already learned about ESD and checking power supply. Is it advisable to go and service public home computers? And before I take up that course I already service some old computers without knowledge of ESD. Yeah, I mean without ESD protection is dangerous.

TGoddard
24-03-2007, 11:24 PM
You could volunteer to help out the technician at a local school when they need it. The worst that can happen is that they don't need help and if it all goes well you could finish with a good reference.

motorbyclist
24-03-2007, 11:47 PM
by "bogged down" i think trinsic meant that you'd be overwhelmed with constant requests for help.

remember most people aren't very computer literate, and/or have the belief that the logical answer isn't the right one (which isn't entirely false), and are too afraid to experiment (again probably a good thing). point being you'll end up writing your it-dependants instructions to stick on their monitor to lessen the phone calls.

you'd think "open avast and click the play button" was simple and easy to remember, if not intuitive;)

Greven
25-03-2007, 12:12 AM
You could volunteer to help out the technician at a local school when they need it. The worst that can happen is that they don't need help and if it all goes well you could finish with a good reference.

Any schools that employ a company to look after their computers will probably not want any students helping out, but if a teacher does everything, they will probably be happy to take someone under their wing & help them learn as much as they can.

motorbyclist
25-03-2007, 12:24 AM
Any schools that employ a company to look after their computers will probably not want any students helping out, but if a teacher does everything, they will probably be happy to take someone under their wing & help them learn as much as they can.

my high school paid a company to run the network (they did a piss-poor job too), but me and some other computer-capable friends occasionally got asked by the teachers to sort out older machines (mostly to get them running well enough to be used again). a few lunchtimes "work" for $20 tuckshop accounts each (and pizza) was a bargain for both parties

Metla
25-03-2007, 12:56 AM
uh...Not to be harsh on then capabilities of the thread starter, But based on past input I would suggest you get as much training as you can.....

Erayd
25-03-2007, 03:08 AM
No offense PedalSlammer, but I'm inclined to agree with Metla on this one.

Take things slowly, and make sure that you really do know enough before you take on customers. Friends and family are a good place to start; they are likely to be a lot more forgiving if you stuff something up. Also be very aware of consequential losses - if you make a mistake with someone's data and you don't have a get-out clause, you could end up bankrupt.

Why don't you try helping some people in the F1 forum - it will help us see what kind of level you are at and perhaps give you some tips on where to go next.


Is it advisable to go and service public home computers?Absolutely not at this stage unless you have learnt a huge amount in the last few months.

pctek
25-03-2007, 09:11 AM
mean how can I be a better technician? Is it by experience? I mean I really want to pass the CompTIA A+ once and since it so expensive it is not worth losing and not pass it.
Do you guys it'll be worth it to start to service other computers with customers?

Yes, experience is everything. Passing this is good for your CV but does nothing for your experience.

No, don't practice on the general public, you can't charge people or practice on their PCs and claim to be a tech at the same time.

Thats why people have suggested friends and family.
Reading threads here helps too, you can learn a lot, try answering some of the questions yourself too............

You could always ask your local shops too if they would be willing to give you some work experience. Don't expect pay straight away.

PedalSlammer
25-03-2007, 09:31 AM
No offense PedalSlammer, but I'm inclined to agree with Metla on this one.

Take things slowly, and make sure that you really do know enough before you take on customers. Friends and family are a good place to start; they are likely to be a lot more forgiving if you stuff something up. Also be very aware of consequential losses - if you make a mistake with someone's data and you don't have a get-out clause, you could end up bankrupt.

Why don't you try helping some people in the F1 forum - it will help us see what kind of level you are at and perhaps give you some tips on where to go next.

Absolutely not at this stage unless you have learnt a huge amount in the last few months.Hmm, good point for stuffing peoples computer up. But I havn't even blown a power supply before, except one time where I get a super cheap and old graphics card onto this Pentium computer and the power supply just blow up, that guy say its working but too bad it was a garage sale so I can't get refunds.

Loss of datas? Hmm, this is a very complicated process. I did lose a lot of datas a lot of time by formating the entire HDD and reinstall Windos. But don't forget there's also one time, when my HDD bad sector formed causing Windows crashed, but in the end I managed to recover every single bit of data that I needed. But my tutor said, if the Windows if stuff up just reinstall it and just don't care about backups and all those stuff.

So can I do tune ups? As an alternative?
i.e.
Cleaning the Temporary Files on computers.
Spyware scanning & removal
Anti-Virus Scanning and removal
Registry fixing and removing unused registries
HDD defrag
system scan disk or check disk

:( I can't mess around with my home computers anymore they're all fixed. In the old days they're really crappy and needs reinstalling Windows all the time, errors, slow boot ups, windows freezing, CPU fan creating too much nosie, etc.
Now, I'm using a Intel P4 1.6GHz with some bad sectors on HDD which is pretty slow but using the software for tune ups the computer can still survive.

Is my experience good enough to deal with customers?
I mean few years ago until now, I use see all sorts of problems with my PCs in home but they're all fixed. Hmm, but I can't really have a chance to play around anymore. In my course, there're some crappy computers to play around with but they didn't have must problems either. That's why I need to play around with these PCs more.

Oh well, I guess I'll have to take you guys advise. But my skill in overclocking is zero. Because I don't have enough equipment to overclock such as better coolers, BIOS, supported overclocking, etc. But this doesn't involve with CompTIA so this is an optional subject to learn?
I forgot one thing, I'm doing a full time course, and I think most schools have their own technitian to fix stuff. The area I live in all schools have their own techinitian working all the time. So it means, I can't be free unless weekends for aroud half a day.
But one person from the same course got employed as a technician but I don't know how deep is his knowledge but he got employed anyway, for once a week for around $20 per hr. This is his first year too.

wotz
25-03-2007, 09:53 AM
But my tutor said, if the Windows if stuff up just reinstall it and just don't care about backups and all those stuff.


Don't even think about charging people if you take that advice.

PedalSlammer
25-03-2007, 09:59 AM
Don't even think about charging people if you take that advice. Yeah, that's the problem, I don't really agree with that. But what about other people in my class who follow this tutor advise?

beama
25-03-2007, 10:12 AM
quailifactions gives you a base to build experience ( which is worth its weight in gold on a cv).

To get experience try approaching hospitals, schools etc where you can work (supervised) along side a experienced tech, often this type of work is unpaid.

logical/lateral thinking helps too.

chiefnz
25-03-2007, 10:26 AM
uh...Not to be harsh on then capabilities of the thread starter, But based on past input I would suggest you get as much training as you can.....

Definitely agree with Met on this one. I've been working on computers since 1993 and whilst I have gained a wealth of experience you cannot replace the encompassing nature a formal qualification gives you as a technician.

Most if not all qualifications will be based on current industry standards and practises, so really you are learning what is relevant in the IT world.

These IT certifications are expensive but this is because they offer specific targeted training on IT.

I'm in my final year at Open Polytechnic doing a Diploma in Information Systems and Technology for Business. There are 6 subjects but when you compare the course content to MCSE or CCNA the diploma doesn't cover nearly as much work as MCSE or CCNA do. It is for this reason I've started my MCSE and CCNA through SeekLearning... I was offered both courses for $4950. A very good deal especially when you consider MCSE usually goes for $8500 - $10000 a pop on its own.

It IS good to repair PC's and all that sort of thing but only do so once you know what you're doing... you need a background before tinkering with other people's PC's especially if you're going to be charging $$$ for the service.

Two pieces of advice I would offer you...

1) Get certified (MCSE, CCNA or CompTIA A+) it will go a long way to getting your foot in the door.

2) Read heaps of PC magazines, this helps you keep up to date with what's happening out there and you'll also find the sections on "Reader's PC Problems" useful as they will help build your own knowledge base.

Cheers

radium
25-03-2007, 01:27 PM
PedalSlammer you could try some online A+ Certification practice tests there are plenty around

JJJJJ
25-03-2007, 02:26 PM
PedalSlammer,Just don't take on any job that you are not 100% certain you can handle.
You just need one stuff up and your reputation is ruined.

QWhy not tru and get part time work with an experienced person. I know everyone has to start somewhere, but for god's sake don't bite off more than you can chew.

trig42
25-03-2007, 04:35 PM
Definitely agree with Met on this one. I've been working on computers since 1993 and whilst I have gained a wealth of experience you cannot replace the encompassing nature a formal qualification gives you as a technician.


I dunno. I work as a tech, I have no formal qualification (in IT). Many of the best Techs I know have no formal qualification. A qualification is nice, and will certainly open doors, but it means that you are good at answering the questions on a test to get that qualification. A succesful tech (IMHO) is one that can think on their feet, can think laterally (outside the box) and can logically work their way through a problem.

Thomas01
25-03-2007, 06:57 PM
There is a lot to learn. Try not to claim knowledge you don't have. I still occasionally help people but regard myself as a teacher NOT technician. When I don't know what I am doing I say so and suggest they get the organ grinder in, instead of the monkey.
I don't charge these days which helps!
But I do know quite a lot of people who are brilliant with computers. None seem to make masses of money. Another thing I notice is that they are all extremely competent in writing English. I may have been lucky here. I do suggest this could be an area of weakness for you and something you can start improving on right now. Your prose is not easy to read, not very logical, and full of spelling mistakes.
On the practical side there are organisations that help in charity work and restoring old computers. In Christchurch there is "Molten Media Trust"
Perhaps they would be able to use you.
Keep your dreams and you will get there eventually.
Tom

pctek
25-03-2007, 09:03 PM
But I havn't even blown a power supply before

Loss of datas? But my tutor said, if the Windows if stuff up just reinstall it and just don't care about backups and all those stuff.

In the old days they're really crappy and needs reinstalling Windows all the time,

Is my experience good enough to deal with customers?

But my skill in overclocking is zero.

Neither have I, why the hell would you??

Point your tutor at this thread here on the forum. Your tutor is an idiot, a cowboy and should be taken out the back and shot. I wouldn't let him near a PC rotting in a dump.

No PC needs reinstalling "all the time". Fix it properly the first time round.

No it is not, because you are in a bad course getting worse advice.
Pay attention here, you'll learn a LOT more.

Overclocking has nothing to do with repairing PCs.

As for tuneups............I guess you could do that, offer the service stating you are learning and NOT an experienced tech. Wouldn't surprise me if half your street flocks to your door anyway.........

Get a range of known malware tools, read the FAQ here if you haven't a clue.
Make sure you configure them first, don't just run them as is%2

pctek
25-03-2007, 09:10 PM
There is a lot to learn. Try not to claim knowledge you don't have. I still occasionally help people but regard myself as a teacher NOT technician. When I don't know what I am doing I say so and suggest they get the organ grinder in, instead of the monkey.


But I do know quite a lot of people who are brilliant with computers. None seem to make masses of money.
Good for you! Too many people blindly fumble on claiming knowledge they don't have. Knowing when to stop is a sign of a good tech in my opinion. We are all still learning, the IT industry doesn't sit still.

Techs don't make masses of money, wrong area of IT, my husband complains about that a lot, he says why couldn't I have been a programmer or something profitable?:nerd:

PedalSlammer
25-03-2007, 09:16 PM
There is a lot to learn. Try not to claim knowledge you don't have. I still occasionally help people but regard myself as a teacher NOT technician. When I don't know what I am doing I say so and suggest they get the organ grinder in, instead of the monkey.
I don't charge these days which helps!
But I do know quite a lot of people who are brilliant with computers. None seem to make masses of money. Another thing I notice is that they are all extremely competent in writing English. I may have been lucky here. I do suggest this could be an area of weakness for you and something you can start improving on right now. Your prose is not easy to read, not very logical, and full of spelling mistakes.
On the practical side there are organisations that help in charity work and restoring old computers. In Christchurch there is "Molten Media Trust"
Perhaps they would be able to use you.
Keep your dreams and you will get there eventually.
TomThanks but no thanks. Sorry, I'm currently living in Auckland. And the problem with charity work for me is pretty hard, because I can't drive, and my student allowance is very very low, and my parents don't give me anymore allowance. Most of student allowance went to my bus fare.

Qualifications is very important, since some said most expert IT techs are not qualified. Based on CompTIA A+ qualification, we have to learn how the early computers work, and more, BINARIES, and not to forget grandpa's computers, ESD (Very Important) a small amount of ESD can damage any computer device. Plus don't forget, I've to read the whole CompTIA A+ book. That's why I'm not very free. :( I got smoked by people who have no knowledge about computers because I didn't read the questions properly, I mean a mini test. Yeah, I know it feels bad, but he got the book a few weeks earlier than me.
Oh, well I might just study harder and making important notes. I believe in IT technician it needs not only knowledge but practical as well.

BIG QUESTION HERE: Does anyone know how much is the PC World Subscription for a year? And how can I get a cheaper subscription? My parents believe this is a waste of money, but I don't really think so. Because some people got zero knowledge about PC and now knows a lot better from PC World Mags.
Oh well, I might just order it, if you guys can give me a little hint to get a cheaper price.

heni72847
26-03-2007, 12:31 AM
imho there are more than enough articles and reviews online to keep you up to date with computer stuff
often when I read the magazine I've already come across the news or already seen something similar before on the net

also.. this forum has helped me build up my knowledge base by quite a bit :D

Erayd
26-03-2007, 09:14 AM
...and my student allowance is very very low, and my parents don't give me anymore allowance.You actually get an allowance? Lucky sod. Why don't you get a job as well? It's entirely possible to study and work at the same time.

bob_doe_nz
26-03-2007, 09:57 AM
Lucky sod. I never got an allowance. Parents earned too much.

Payed my way partially through tech.

PedalSlammer
26-03-2007, 02:25 PM
Huh, allowance? They all went to my bus fare. :( But it's not lucky some dudes got $200 per week.

godfather
26-03-2007, 03:03 PM
PedalSlammer, please also consider that if you are doing repairs/alteration "within" the case for payment or reward, technically you need a basic qual in the Electrical area, in the nature of training by a qualified person for safety.

An old thread that covered it is here:
http://forums.pcworld.co.nz/showthread.php?t=50532

SolMiester
26-03-2007, 03:43 PM
Family(I don't have cousins, aunt, uncles, and all that but most of the computers in my house is working fine) & Friends?
Bogged down? I already solve all the problems in my home computers. i.e. I'm using a HDD with bad sector too which is not advisable because it's too tight for my budget to spend $100 since my new PC is costing $$$. And since the HDD is pretty slow and laggy but I still manage to use fine but not for lots of data storage anyway.
By the way I've already learned about ESD and checking power supply. Is it advisable to go and service public home computers? And before I take up that course I already service some old computers without knowledge of ESD. Yeah, I mean without ESD protection is dangerous.

I wouldn't recommend you go out and do ANYTHING with public PC's unless you have indemnity insurance

Lizard
26-03-2007, 04:06 PM
BIG QUESTION HERE: Does anyone know how much is the PC World Subscription for a year? And how can I get a cheaper subscription? My parents believe this is a waste of money, but I don't really think so. Because some people got zero knowledge about PC and now knows a lot better from PC World Mags.
Oh well, I might just order it, if you guys can give me a little hint to get a cheaper price.

Have a look at your local library - many libraries have the latest copy of computer magazines (including PC World) either to read in the library or to borrow for a week. You won't find it cheaper than that.

PedalSlammer
26-03-2007, 05:13 PM
Have a look at your local library - many libraries have the latest copy of computer magazines (including PC World) either to read in the library or to borrow for a week. You won't find it cheaper than that.Hmm, sounds kinda great. The area I'm living is quite far away from library. So, I'll check how much is it and order it.

And working with pro technician. Hmm, I think most tutors in the course show us how to do stuff and then start commenting when students do it. The tutor who said reinstalling Windows is pretty crap but the other tutor is a pro from the gradpa's PC.

Laura
26-03-2007, 06:24 PM
Huh, allowance? They all went to my bus fare. :( But it's not lucky some dudes got $200 per week.

If my memory of your early posts is correct, you are 13 years old..?

I suggest you still have plenty of time to learn how to fix other people's computers before having to earn your own living.

godfather
26-03-2007, 06:28 PM
I wouldn't recommend you go out and do ANYTHING with public PC's unless you have indemnity insurance

I second that.

While "friends and family" will not take action if they think you lost their unbacked valuable up data, others may not. Even though you may be completely innocent of the act, the cost of defending would be thousands, to not defend means you could lose a civil claim and face damages. At minimum set up a limited liability company, but that has compliance costs also.

winmacguy
26-03-2007, 06:41 PM
If my memory of your early posts is correct, you are 13 years old..?


PedalSlammer, if you are only 13 years old then you still have another 4 years of high school ahead of you plus 2-3 years or how ever long to do a B Comp Sci or similar at uni before you need to worry about how to get work and experience "fixing PCs" I would imagine that your will have expanded your horizons from just becoming a fully fledged network tech or developer by the time you come out.

In the meantime enjoy being a teenager (assuming you are 13?) and keep building on your experience. It might also pay to get a bit of experience with other systems and hardware as well since a lot can happen in the computing world in 4 years. ;)

Good luck. :)

winmacguy
26-03-2007, 06:54 PM
PedalSlammer if your wanting to be really forward thinking, instead of looking for friends and family members PCs that are in need of fixing - why not custom build and sell (maybe even design) a few decent machines that DON'T break down (now there's something new!)and earn yourself some cash and get experience from both sides of the fence.
Not sure if it is still going but you could check out this article.
http://www.extremetech.com/article2/0,1558,2105905,00.asp?kc=ETRSS02129TX1K0000532

plod
26-03-2007, 07:17 PM
I suggest you do better english. learn more skills of the native langauge. this help will you in new future

This will help when asking for an ass and end up getting an arse

Laura
26-03-2007, 08:17 PM
Ooops...

I now realise I was thinking of a different poster when I suggested he's aged 13.

So how old are you, PedalSlammer?

Jen
26-03-2007, 08:31 PM
I now realise I was thinking of a different poster when I suggested he's aged 13.

So how old are you, PedalSlammer?No, you are correct (13 or maybe 14 now). PedalSlammer used to have his age in his public profile, so it was public knowledge ...

A lot of good advice has been given and I agree, you can hardly charge people to *learn* on their computers. Learn from PressF1, it is completely free and a great resource :thumbs: . Help out others with their problems (both here and with friends) and gain experience that way. Good on you from wanting to learn more and gain some qualifications to help you along your way. :)

Jen
26-03-2007, 08:34 PM
I suggest you do better english. learn more skills of the native langauge. this help will you in new future

This will help when asking for an ass and end up getting an arseCrikey, cried the pot calling the kettle black ... :lol:

Anyway, this is not the local spelling bee competition nor the grammar police forum so lighten up.

winmacguy
26-03-2007, 08:36 PM
Another good couple of sites for picking stuff up are OSNews.com and the one for all sys admins and knowledgeable techs is slashdot.org, both have RSS feeds for your chosen topic. Slashdot (/.) tends to be the more tech orientated of the two.
Hope that helps.

pctek
26-03-2007, 09:28 PM
why not custom build and sell (maybe even design) a few decent machines that DON'T break down

I don't think so.
There is supposed to be after sales support offered with a PC.

And he hasn't the knowledge or suppliers to build with qulaity parts, nor the experience to troubleshoot if it doesn't go smoothly.

13? Grow up first.

trig42
26-03-2007, 10:04 PM
I suggest you do better english. learn more skills of the native langauge. this help will you in new future

This will help when asking for an ass and end up getting an arse



Crikey, cried the pot calling the kettle black ... :lol:

Anyway, this is not the local spelling bee competition nor the grammar police forum so lighten up.

Sarcasm thinks me?

Anyhoo. If you are only 13 or 14 PedalSlammer, then go and become a pest at your local friendly computer repair store. Ask questions, be curious. You learn a lot by asking questions.

plod
26-03-2007, 11:27 PM
Crikey, cried the pot calling the kettle black ... :lol:

Anyway, this is not the local spelling bee competition nor the grammar police forum so lighten up.

couldn't resist. it wasn't about spelling or grammar. It had to do with the ability to string a sentence together that made sense

PedalSlammer
27-03-2007, 03:14 PM
13? Are you kidding? How can you get allowance if you're 13?
B of Science, etc. etc.
High school days is over for me, and I don't really like my high school at all. :annoyed: They employed teachers that do no know how to teach students. ie. more tips of exams rather than normal answers.

Spelling and grammers? I don't think you need that much in this course but it is important that you can understand English because most of the time you'll need the book.

Oh well, I can't always come to PressF1 all the time because I got to learn IRQs, I/O Address, etc. etc. .. There is so much to learn.

If I'm free I'll try to help a little.

Laura
27-03-2007, 03:19 PM
Ooops...

I now realise I was thinking of a different poster when I suggested he's aged 13.

So how old are you, PedalSlammer?

You didn't answer my question.

PedalSlammer
27-03-2007, 03:45 PM
You didn't answer my question.Hmm, its about 25 now.

winmacguy
27-03-2007, 06:53 PM
Spelling, grammar and a good command of the english language are important when you are conversing with other IT workers or management or needing to write out an IT management plan or possibly put a purchase order and or sell your idea of future IT plans to the company you work for.

Erayd
27-03-2007, 08:40 PM
I think another reason that people in the IT industry tend to have such good English skills is because often the job requires exactness - and hence you get IT nitpickers who abhor incorrectness. I know I'm one :D

TGoddard
27-03-2007, 10:54 PM
Bletch, you forgot the full stop after that grin emoticon :groan: .

aidanmaz
27-03-2007, 11:10 PM
hmmm since i am too a new tech,trying to pass MCSA, best bet is to, like everyone says, offer assistance to family and friends. try and make contacts in the neighbourhood, See if you can find old pcs from businesses, try fixing those (iget my dad to bring pcshome from work to fix, learning curve a lot of the time!) Dont stress to uch about A+, if you know ur stuff u'll be fine.

Erayd
28-03-2007, 12:51 PM
Bletch, you forgot the full stop after that grin emoticon :groan: .The grin was the full stop!

FoxyMX
28-03-2007, 01:20 PM
Bletch, you forgot the full stop after that grin emoticon :groan: .


Actually, the full stop should have been before the grin. :groan:

PedalSlammer
28-03-2007, 02:27 PM
hmmm since i am too a new tech,trying to pass MCSA, best bet is to, like everyone says, offer assistance to family and friends. try and make contacts in the neighbourhood, See if you can find old pcs from businesses, try fixing those (iget my dad to bring pcshome from work to fix, learning curve a lot of the time!) Dont stress to uch about A+, if you know ur stuff u'll be fine.
In the A+ book there's a lot to learn, not only PC but dealing with customers as well. I still got a lot to do that's why I visit pressf1 once a day and then gone for the day to study. I've tried some trail A+ and it looks simple but there's a lot of mistakes. Plus you need 80% to PASS. Other than that is considered failed.

Pete O'Neil
28-03-2007, 02:52 PM
It might help if PedalSlammer starting taking other peoples advice. Numerous times on this forum he popped up in threads making ridiculous comments, and then when hes been corrected he insists on sticking to his misguided beliefs.

His posts are also incredibly difficult to read, just poorly constructed. As a rule if i see anything with the name PedalSlammer next to it I bypass it purely because its too much effort to figure out what hes trying to say. Theres no way you'll survive as a technician if you can't communicated clearly with your customers. You have to remember that most customer are more of a "n00b" than you, and thus rely on your "expertise" if they cant understand you they sure aren't gonna come back.

Becoming experienced isn't something that can happen overnight, it takes time and commitment. Just reading through a forum like PressF1 regularly can teach you a lot. Also reading reviews and online columns can give you a good understanding of where the industry is at.

Are you completing a BSci with the intention of becoming a PC tech? Don't you think that degree is a bit overkill then?

Greven
28-03-2007, 04:55 PM
Are you completing a BSci with the intention of becoming a PC tech? Don't you think that degree is a bit overkill then?

The entry level in most areas of IT are flooded at the moment, so you need a degree just to get a foot in the door, and a decent knowledge of whatever you are looking at doing to get the job.

Pete O'Neil
28-03-2007, 05:40 PM
The entry level in most areas of IT are flooded at the moment, so you need a degree just to get a foot in the door, and a decent knowledge of whatever you are looking at doing to get the job.
I sure ive read several articles lately about shortages in the IT industry. Do you mean that generic tech jobs (help desk etc) are flooded?

motorbyclist
28-03-2007, 08:25 PM
I sure ive read several articles lately about shortages in the IT industry. Do you mean that generic tech jobs (help desk etc) are flooded?

i don't think i've ever called a help desk to actually get a tech.

last time i bothered calling for a non-isp related issue i got read the windows troubleshooter which i had already done, and was then told they had no more help for me, and to consider a reinstall (only when i suggested it though):mad:

PedalSlammer
31-03-2007, 01:25 PM
Ok, my language is a bit poor because I don't have that much to construct a proper sentance, paragraph, etc.
*i don't think i've ever called a help desk to actually get a tech.

last time i bothered calling for a non-isp related issue i got read the windows troubleshooter which i had already done, and was then told they had no more help for me, and to consider a reinstall (only when i suggested it though)* That's what the poor techs do, it is always uninstall all the time because they've plenty of time for that. If you're a power user with lots of GB data on the HDD you woldn't have time to uninstall except find way to fix it.

Shortage in IT industry? Actaully the answer is No. There's plenty of techs around. These days the tech courses are a lot easier than you think because you don't need to learn old stuff from the 80286-80486 CPUs age. That time the computer was complicated and hard to use, and no internet as well so most of the time it requires more of your knowledge skills to tackel a problem.

The problem with me jumping into servicing customers computers is, you can get things done a lot easier, i.e. Windows XP is pretty easy to use and same as Win 2000 too, plus I'm too bored to play around with my home PCs. Besides, if I uninstall the OS, it'll take me a long time to back up those files before uninstalling it.

:( After this course which IT industry should I go to? Oh well, might want to passed the CompTIA A+ first.

pctek
31-03-2007, 08:16 PM
If you're a power user with lots of GB data on the HDD you woldn't have time to uninstall except find way to fix it.

These days the tech courses are a lot easier than you think because you don't need to learn old stuff from the 80286-80486 CPUs age. That time the computer was complicated and hard to use, and no internet as well so most of the time it requires more of your knowledge skills to tackel a problem.

The problem with me jumping into servicing customers computers is, you can get things done a lot easier, i.e. Windows XP is pretty easy to use and same as Win 2000 too, plus I'm too bored to play around with my home PCs.

What?!
Uninstall what? If you mean reinstall the O/S that why I have a ghost image.
Takes me a whole 9 minutes.

Yes I can see why you might think its easy, your tutor is a halfwit and you think all the old stuff is irrelevant. Think about how similar a command line shell in WIndows is to DOS, then tell me its irrelevant.
What these sort of **** courses do is create useless techs who get stuck the minute clicking on a few things doesn't work. Probably why the reinstall theory is so prevalent. They have no idea how to fix anything. Or troubleshoot it.

You're bored with your own so you want to go create havoc on someone elses?

You are beginning to annoy me with your attitude. And your advice all over the place.
Fine answer some if you want but stick to the ones where you are confident of your advice.

drcspy
31-03-2007, 08:33 PM
oh yeh dont fall into that trap.....i remember back in 2001 when I did my A+ a fellow classmate sayin 'oh we dont need to learn dos it's not used anymore.'......fool I thought.......what if you end up having to do anytin on a win98 system in dos ??......or ......or ......or........yeah right...also its worth knowing a bit about the older systems cause it gives you a better understanding of hwo the newer ones work....

PedalSlammer
01-04-2007, 01:13 PM
What?!
Uninstall what? If you mean reinstall the O/S that why I have a ghost image.
Takes me a whole 9 minutes.

Yes I can see why you might think its easy, your tutor is a halfwit and you think all the old stuff is irrelevant. Think about how similar a command line shell in WIndows is to DOS, then tell me its irrelevant.
What these sort of **** courses do is create useless techs who get stuck the minute clicking on a few things doesn't work. Probably why the reinstall theory is so prevalent. They have no idea how to fix anything. Or troubleshoot it.

You're bored with your own so you want to go create havoc on someone elses?

You are beginning to annoy me with your attitude. And your advice all over the place.
Fine answer some if you want but stick to the ones where you are confident of your advice.Hmm, is it really a crappy course? Ghost? I never tried it before, and the tutor didn't mention about that either.
Create havoc on someelse? Did you mean fixing rather than damaging?
So, is Norton Ghost have been replaced by Save & Restore?
Interesting how can I back up 100GB of data successfully without burning CDs/DVDs etc?
So I guess this is a better place for noob technician? :illogical Looks like I have to take two courses at a time. One crappy and another one for good experince with logic sense.

Erayd
01-04-2007, 02:16 PM
Did you mean fixing rather than damaging?No, I think that damaging was the intent there. I agree.


So, is Norton Ghost have been replaced by Save & Restore?I take it you mean system restore? No, that has not replaced Ghost - they do two completely different things. Try using google.


Interesting how can I back up 100GB of data successfully without burning CDs/DVDs etc?If you don't know the answer to that one, you shouldn't even be thinking about becoming a tech at this point!


So I guess this is a better place for noob technician? :illogical Looks like I have to take two courses at a time. One crappy and another one for good experince with logic sense.Why? If the course if junk, where is the point in taking it? Much better to spend your money and time on something more worthwhile.

drcspy
01-04-2007, 03:03 PM
ummmmmmmmm...........



Quote:
So, is Norton Ghost have been replaced by Save & Restore?
I take it you mean system restore? No, that has not replaced Ghost - they do two completely different things. Try using google.

Quote:
Interesting how can I back up 100GB of data successfully without burning CDs/DVDs etc?
If you don't know the answer to that one, you shouldn't even be thinking about becoming a tech at this point!

well norton save and restore is different to ghost yes.......

as for backing up ghost has always been able to back up to most media including but not limited to cd's dvd's and harddrives...

drcspy
01-04-2007, 03:03 PM
ps: for bletch

save and restore is NOT system restore...

Greven
01-04-2007, 03:26 PM
Most IT courses are designed to give you a foundation to build on, not teach you how to do the actual job.
Once you understand the theory, you understand things a lot better when experimenting with your own system. Once you have the theory and experimenting under your belt, you can try to get by on your own, but it is a much better idea to work with someone who has been in the industry for a while, and learn their way of doing things.

It is a pity that so many businesses are unwilling to give people work experience even when they are willing to work for free.

Erayd
01-04-2007, 05:42 PM
save and restore is NOT system restore...Thanks for that. I feel like an idiot now... :rolleyes:

Erayd
01-04-2007, 05:44 PM
save and restore is NOT system restore...Thanks for that. I feel like an idiot now...

drcspy
01-04-2007, 06:06 PM
lol just a little symantec (semantic) confusion lol....

Erayd
01-04-2007, 06:10 PM
Nooooo, a pun...:xmouth:

motorbyclist
02-04-2007, 12:55 AM
LOL

PedalSlammer
02-04-2007, 03:54 PM
Most IT courses are designed to give you a foundation to build on, not teach you how to do the actual job.
Once you understand the theory, you understand things a lot better when experimenting with your own system. Once you have the theory and experimenting under your belt, you can try to get by on your own, but it is a much better idea to work with someone who has been in the industry for a while, and learn their way of doing things.

It is a pity that so many businesses are unwilling to give people work experience even when they are willing to work for free.
:thumbs:At the current moment, not all techs are good especially the techs from Telecom and Ihug. And some computer shop techs are pretty noob like I asked what's the performance increasel from CL5 to CL4 memory? :annoyed: They only said it's faster. performance percentage? And they said they don't know.
And from telecom, one time I called up and they said my router refuse to accept new settings. Take the router back to the shop and replace it.
And then what do I do? Hmm, I try all types of combination users on the ADSL Router: ie. .......xadsl@xtra.co.nz etc. etc. But I find that it is working with this @xadsl.xtra.co.nz (Now that's a tech without replacing a Router)
Another one from Ihug, Hmm, that time I have no idea how to configure the WinFast(I forgot the name for that router) or something, I ring them up, and said I'm having problems with my router. They said that Router? We don't support that router.
Hmm, the next day, I did try to configure it myself and it worked.

Courses is to help you to pass the CompTIA A+ technician not becoming a pro tech but a noob tech with theory knowledge, so I guess you have to experiment things yourself. i.e. What is Norton Ghost? A noob tech will go to the computer shop and asked what is Norton Ghost. And a pro tech will use the internet especially Google our best friend have all the answers.

SolMiester
02-04-2007, 05:25 PM
:thumbs:At the current moment, not all techs are good especially the techs from Telecom and Ihug. And some computer shop techs are pretty noob like I asked what's the performance increasel from CL5 to CL4 memory? :annoyed: They only said it's faster. performance percentage? And they said they don't know.
And from telecom, one time I called up and they said my router refuse to accept new settings. Take the router back to the shop and replace it.
And then what do I do? Hmm, I try all types of combination users on the ADSL Router: ie. .......xadsl@xtra.co.nz etc. etc. But I find that it is working with this @xadsl.xtra.co.nz (Now that's a tech without replacing a Router)
Another one from Ihug, Hmm, that time I have no idea how to configure the WinFast(I forgot the name for that router) or something, I ring them up, and said I'm having problems with my router. They said that Router? We don't support that router.
Hmm, the next day, I did try to configure it myself and it worked.

Courses is to help you to pass the CompTIA A+ technician not becoming a pro tech but a noob tech with theory knowledge, so I guess you have to experiment things yourself. i.e. What is Norton Ghost? A noob tech will go to the computer shop and asked what is Norton Ghost. And a pro tech will use the internet especially Google our best friend have all the answers.

Settle down there Pedal, Cas latency will not yield noticeable difference between 4 & 5, so to ask for % is a bit anal, when you dont know the answer yourself. Routers are known to corrupt when you continually try to update setting, and I had to contend with mine for awhile. Usually a re-flash or even just factory default reboot will do the trick. Telecom tech are not tech per sa , but help desk operators in most cases with a knowledge base to work with and set routines to diagnose issues. They DO NOT support non-standard setup, WHY do you think they GIVE the routers away?

Metla
02-04-2007, 05:34 PM
There is little hope.

pctek
02-04-2007, 06:17 PM
noob one time I called up and they said my router refuse to accept new settings. Take the router back to the shop and replace it.
And then what do I do? Hmm, I try all types of combination users on the ADSL Router: ie. .......xadsl@xtra.co.nz etc. etc. But I find that it is working with this @xadsl.xtra.co.nz (Now that's a tech without replacing a Router)

Another one from Ihug, Hmm, that time I have no idea how to configure the WinFast(I forgot the name for that router) or something, I ring them up, and said I'm having problems with my router.
the next day, I did try to configure it myself and it worked.


noob yourself.

Techs troubleshoot and try things before ringing callcentre types or shops.

PedalSlammer
02-04-2007, 08:58 PM
noob yourself.

Techs troubleshoot and try things before ringing callcentre types or shops.lol, I wasn't a tech that time. So I guess I a real noob. I only got to use the internet in 2002.
All the time is study, not much time for PCs anyway. And during the 80486 days and around 1998 - 2000, PCs are still expensive. Why stop using PC, because it was a real hassel and requires technician all the time.

% is real annal? Come on give it around 25% or something. I also ask the crap tutor about this and she has no idea about the percentage too.

SolMiester
02-04-2007, 09:50 PM
lol, I wasn't a tech that time. So I guess I a real noob. I only got to use the internet in 2002.
All the time is study, not much time for PCs anyway. And during the 80486 days and around 1998 - 2000, PCs are still expensive. Why stop using PC, because it was a real hassel and requires technician all the time.

% is real annal? Come on give it around 25% or something. I also ask the crap tutor about this and she has no idea about the percentage too.

Pedal, only via benchmarking will you notice the difference between CL4 & 5. What are you, some sort of e-penis wannabe. No tech is going to be worried about that and they certainly wouldn't carry the info around in their head. A good tech will learn to read the manual in any given situation and an experienced tech knows when it matters.

My advise to you is buy some very old pc's and learn via failure & success. Dont focus just on hardware/software support. You maybe better at database design, web design, connectivity, DR, Management, network design etc...IT is more than just PC's

Sweep
02-04-2007, 09:54 PM
[quote=PedalSlammer;538733]Another one from Ihug, Hmm, that time I have no idea how to configure the WinFast(I forgot the name for that router) or something, I ring them up, and said I'm having problems with my router. They said that Router? We don't support that router.
Hmm, the next day, I did try to configure it myself and it worked.

Interesting. You could have a Winfast Motherboard, TV card or graphic card.

I don't know of any Winfast router. Where did you get it from?

I would suggest you read other advice in this thread.

Most of this is helpful.

Greven
02-04-2007, 10:25 PM
ou maybe better at database design, web design, connectivity, DR, Management, network design etc...IT is more than just PC's

Pirated software can be a very useful facilitator for learning

motorbyclist
02-04-2007, 10:49 PM
% is real annal? Come on give it around 25% or something. I also ask the crap tutor about this and she has no idea about the percentage too.

that percentage would probably vary slightly depending on motherboard, cpu, memory clock etc etc.... furthermore how do you quantify "performance"? number crunching or framerates? even loading/use of the ram would affect that.

and shop salespeople typically know very little anyway

i suggest wikipedia

PedalSlammer
03-04-2007, 04:14 PM
that percentage would probably vary slightly depending on motherboard, cpu, memory clock etc etc.... furthermore how do you quantify "performance"? number crunching or framerates? even loading/use of the ram would affect that.

and shop salespeople typically know very little anyway

i suggest wikipediaAny I got some answers from tomshardware.com The higher the latency the faster then RAM can perform too i.e. PC2-533 with CL3 can have almost the same performance with the PC2-800 CL4 memory.
Just have a good look and see.

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 07:59 PM
It's not NZ but since the IT market is international it is an interesting report for newbie IT workers looking to get started

Entry-Level Workers Head into a Mixed Market
Signifying a confident incoming workforce, 89 percent of prospective graduates said that they expect to receive at least one job offer when they graduate, while 74 percent expect two or more offers, which is 10 percent more than last year, according to a new entry-level job report.
The report, published on April 2 by New York-based career Web site Monster.com, notes a heightened competitive note in the beginners' job market as, on average, employers anticipated receiving 73 applications for each entry-level position.

Yet, employers also spoke to a healthier job market, as 76 percent plan to hire 2007 graduates in the spring or summer, up from 72 percent last year. Thirty-eight percent expect to recruit more entry-level workers than they did in 2006.
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,2110440,00.asp?kc=EWRSS03119TX1K0000594

I would agree with the previous poster who mentioned the different areas of the tech market in addition to just being limited to a PC repair/maintenance technician. It is always worth looking into areas such as systems admin (Win/Linux/Sun/Unix), networking, e-commerce/web design, software development to ad to your skills to increase your employability.

motorbyclist
03-04-2007, 08:05 PM
Any I got some answers from tomshardware.com The higher the latency the faster then RAM can perform too i.e. PC2-533 with CL3 can have almost the same performance with the PC2-800 CL4 memory.
Just have a good look and see.


that percentage would probably vary slightly depending on motherboard, cpu, memory clock etc etc.... furthermore how do you quantify "performance"? number crunching or framerates? even loading/use of the ram would affect that.

and shop salespeople typically know very little anyway

i suggest wikipedia yea toms hardware is a very good place to start, and i'm sure you now understand why the salesperson couldn't answer such a question.


It's not NZ but since the IT market is international it is an interesting report for newbie IT workers looking to get started

Entry-Level Workers Head i...

I would agree with the previous poster who mentioned the different areas of the tech market in addition to just being limited to a PC repair/maintenance technician. It is always worth looking into areas such as systems admin (Win/Linux/Sun/Unix), networking, e-commerce/web design, software development to ad to your skills to increase your employability.

me too, i hear web design is particuarly lucrative over in europe (not that location should really be a major factor for internet services, but they pay better over there. go figure)

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 08:27 PM
Successful web design pays quite well in the US too, especially in places like NY and San Francisco.
The San Francisco bay area is also the home of a number of very large tech companies.

Myth
03-04-2007, 10:42 PM
OKay, I read the first couple of pages and the last one.
I have been a tinkerer since I was a teenager, and got into computers around about 2002-2001. Decided after a while (and after the warranty on my new computer ran out) to play round with computer innards. Granted my first few efforts weren't too successful.. but thats the way it goes I guess.
In 2005 I did A+ (and easily passed). Taught me heaps. But what taught me more was the following:
Around the time I did A+ I also joined here and racked up a heap of posts trying to help people (hopefully I did lol). I also watched others posts (namely Metla, pctek, Speedy); to learn from those way more experienced than I.
The other thing I did was to buy old computer parts, boxes of bits, and make a working computer out of the parts; complete with any old os I had lying around. By the end the computer would be fully functional and able to connect to the net (either via dialup or ethernet).
I also did 4 months unpaid work experience for a New Plymouth firm (driving in from here 3 days a week on a students income).
While the work experience helped, it didn't help as much as what the other 2 things did

This is just my experience... this is what worked for me

Currently I work out of the I.T industry but have a small clientele of people who pay me for computer work and are confident in my work (I know this coz they keep coming back :p)

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 10:49 PM
Good work Tazz. Keep it up.:thumbs:

Speedy Gonzales
03-04-2007, 11:13 PM
Yer good onya Tazz. I was pretty similar to you.

I started getting into computers in 1985-86 about 20 yrs ago.

This started with the C-64, Amigas, then the PC's.

It wasnt till later that I decided to starting building systems up, as most systems u buy (even now) are full of things, u dont even use or need.

Because, it was one way to find out what goes where, what it does, and how a computer works, that kind of thing.

Only thing I've havent done is go to any courses, and I dont have any IT quals.

Which, I spose I should have done years ago. But didnt. I just learnt mainly by trial and error. (ie: if something fried, or something didnt work, I didnt do it again ) :D

I did do a test at the computer place, in Khyber pass up here in Auckland, and just managed to pass.

But didnt go any further. I didnt really fancy paying 11-12k, to go to the course then.

Like u tho, I do have ex workmates ringing me up and asking for help often, if they've got / had probs.

I spose the biggest screwup for me, is I didnt get a licence, (well I couldnt previously anyway). So, I think I'm pretty limited, on where or how far I can travel, if I do decide to apply for something, related to I.T.

winmacguy
03-04-2007, 11:56 PM
But didnt go any further. I didnt really fancy paying 11-12k, to go to the course then.


Guess it depends on your priorities in life. I got my initial qualifications by the time I was 25 (non IT related) and upon returning from my OE in 1997 and having another year or 2 working back here decided to study computer graphic design in 2000. I was the 2nd oldest person in the class. Most full time design related courses go for around 6-7k with fairly good prospects of getting a job afterwards - the better your skills and determination the better your chances.

I know of a lot of older guys and some girls who have been designing for 10-15 years who have no paper qualifications but lots of experience which you can't really beat.

pctek
04-04-2007, 07:49 PM
Around the time I did A+ I also joined here and racked up a heap of posts trying to help people (hopefully I did lol). I also watched others posts (namely Metla, pctek, Speedy); to learn from those way more experienced than I.
The other thing I did was to buy old computer parts, boxes of bits, and make a working computer out of the parts; complete with any old os I had lying around.

Good for you.
And people get recommended too from here: IE.
I just an old couple over to see Greven at his workplace to get their ancient PC sorted. Nice of me huh? Or maybe that was nasty of me...........:lol: