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qazwsxokmijn
18-03-2007, 04:15 PM
As title says....I just finished transferring components from one case to another one, turned on the PSU and poof, something blew a little spark and smoke.

However, the computer is turning on and running just fine. Haven't tried gaming though.

Does anybody know what the heck is going on here?

Speedy Gonzales
18-03-2007, 04:52 PM
Most probably shorted it on the case or something.

qazwsxokmijn
18-03-2007, 05:03 PM
Most probably shorted it on the case or something.
What do you mean?

Speedy Gonzales
18-03-2007, 05:12 PM
Well u did put it in another case didnt u??

You may have forgotten to put a spacer in and it shorted (the mobo) on the case.

Did u put the mobo into another case as well? Or just PCI cards etc?

pctek
18-03-2007, 05:34 PM
Sure its the PSU? If not, take the entire thing apart again.

If yes, replace it, I wouldn't trust it.

qazwsxokmijn
18-03-2007, 10:34 PM
The whole thing inside the old case was removed and went into the new one.

Pctek, I am quite sure it is the PSU. The sparks and smoke came out of the vent holes of the PSU.

And I don't what you mean by a spacer, Speedy.

Sweep
18-03-2007, 10:51 PM
The whole thing inside the old case was removed and went into the new one.

Pctek, I am quite sure it is the PSU. The sparks and smoke came out of the vent holes of the PSU.

And I don't what you mean by a spacer, Speedy.

And the computer is running just fine? How?

A spacer is a stand off between the motherboard and the case. If you put the motherboard into a different case then the new case MAY have had a brass screw which should have been removed before inserting the motherboard. IF there was one then it may be touching a part of the motherboard which it should not be.

But what would I know. I can't see it from here.

SolMiester
18-03-2007, 11:19 PM
The whole thing inside the old case was removed and went into the new one.

Pctek, I am quite sure it is the PSU. The sparks and smoke came out of the vent holes of the PSU.

And I don't what you mean by a spacer, Speedy.

Oh boy!....:waughh:

Edit, how much did you pay for your pc?

Sweep
18-03-2007, 11:55 PM
Oh boy!....:waughh:

Edit, how much did you pay for your pc?

Oh boy. You think you are a consultant!

Did you not know that computers run on smoke?

When the smoke leaks out then there will be a fair chance the computer will die.

Please note that this is very much tongue in cheek and I hope I am not offensive to you.

I'd like to know how the computer is running fine given the above. I suspect others are also reading this with interest.

R2x1
19-03-2007, 01:01 AM
Yep. I think the computer is trying to tell you something. So is Speedy.

SurferJoe46
19-03-2007, 06:17 AM
Along this same line, I had a fellow ask me to look at his little electric clock, as he said it too had smoked "a little" the other morning.

As he was standing over my shoulder and watched me pull out the security Torx® screws from the case, a rather large bug fell out, having been well cooked and probably the source of "a little" smoke.

He was rather astounded, as was I when he said: "Ah..now I see what the problem is...the caretaker died!"

SolMiester
19-03-2007, 01:34 PM
Oh boy. You think you are a consultant!

Did you not know that computers run on smoke?

When the smoke leaks out then there will be a fair chance the computer will die.

Please note that this is very much tongue in cheek and I hope I am not offensive to you.

I'd like to know how the computer is running fine given the above. I suspect others are also reading this with interest.

Not sure what you are referring to here Sweep?, the 'oh boy' statement was in ref that this guy who swaps his motherboard out didnt appear to know what a spacer was, and I'm thinking, this guy has too much money or didnt think to read his installation manual.

I am currently wondering if he did in fact use spacers and how the system is stall running!

Hitech
19-03-2007, 01:41 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: computers run on smoke yeehaaa what a hoot i cant stop laughing.

Metla
19-03-2007, 02:17 PM
All electronic devices run on smoke, When the smoke escapes the item is dead. I thought everyone knew this.

qazwsxokmijn
19-03-2007, 05:02 PM
Hey all, thanks for the input. I took it to QMB today and the tech guy said there's nothing wrong with it, as the PC is running just fine. And by fine I mean as if nothing had happened to it.

It may have been some fried plastic shrapnel that accidentally got into the PSU when my father was drilling a hole near the PSU (I told him to remove the friggin PSU first!!! But no, he didn't listen to me).

pctek
19-03-2007, 05:20 PM
What was he drilling holes for?
:eek:

Hitech
19-03-2007, 05:23 PM
For the smoke to escape.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Billy T
19-03-2007, 09:28 PM
Hey all, thanks for the input. I took it to QMB today and the tech guy said there's nothing wrong with it, as the PC is running just fine. And by fine I mean as if nothing had happened to it.
Sorry to bust your bubble, but it is definitely NOT ok. Sparks and smoke mean the destruction of one or more components, and those components are almost certainly part of (or associated with) an overload sensing network.

Yes, the PSU will run ok while on normal loads, but if anything goes wrong in your computer, or the mains voltage takes a hike due to a power surge or you suffer a brown-out, the supply may not shut down to protect itself and you may lose your motherboard, cpu, ram etc in a catastrophic runaway sequence of failures.

I have probably repaired in excess of 2000 switchmode power supplies over the years (not for computers) and I have seen many self-destruct when their inbuilt protection systems failed. I bet the QMB "tech" just ran it on a normal supply from the mains, and that won't tell you squat about whether it will cope with winter sags, surges, brownouts, spikes and all the other rubbish that happens on our powerlines.

Power supplies are cheap, replace it.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

qazwsxokmijn
19-03-2007, 10:13 PM
Sorry to bust your bubble, but it is definitely NOT ok. Sparks and smoke mean the destruction of one or more components, and those components are almost certainly part of (or associated with) an overload sensing network.

Yes, the PSU will run ok while on normal loads, but if anything goes wrong in your computer, or the mains voltage takes a hike due to a power surge or you suffer a brown-out, the supply may not shut down to protect itself and you may lose your motherboard, cpu, ram etc in a catastrophic runaway sequence of failures.

I have probably repaired in excess of 2000 switchmode power supplies over the years (not for computers) and I have seen many self-destruct when their inbuilt protection systems failed. I bet the QMB "tech" just ran it on a normal supply from the mains, and that won't tell you squat about whether it will cope with winter sags, surges, brownouts, spikes and all the other rubbish that happens on our powerlines.

Power supplies are cheap, replace it.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)
Wow, that actually scared me. Literally.

The tech guy at QMB said that the drilling of the hole could well be the problem.

Some of the plastic shrapnels must have found their way into the PSU and got themselves lodged between capacitors and blew up on contact...or so he told me.

I don't think QMB would lie about it - he didn't charge me anything, and if he was the money-eyed type, he would have said something is definitely wrong with the PSU and made me buy a new PSU.

Still, Billy, I will take your words into consideration and take it to ETC this week.

Oh, and I need to say that my PSU is not some cheapo one. It's an Acbel 500W. One of those rich PSUs with safety features and triple +12V rails. Sells for about $170 new I think.

godfather
19-03-2007, 10:36 PM
"plastic shrapnels" (whatever they are...) - are unlikely to have done the deed as plastic is usually an insulator, but mettalic swarf from the drill sure would.

Billy T
19-03-2007, 10:54 PM
"plastic shrapnels" (whatever they are...) - are unlikely to have done the deed as plastic is usually an insulator, but metallic swarf from the drill sure would. I agree GF, but......swarf may spark, but it won't smoke.

Maybe the answer lies in opening up the PSU case and looking to see what has been burning Q, or having a competent electronics technician have a look for you and give an opinion. If you see that a component has burned up or an expert confirms that for you, buy an new supply.

I wouldn't trust it, they are high current-capability devices, and and if they go up big time the potential for collateral damage is a real worry. You could kill the electronics for your HDD for example, which is very expensive to recover from if you need that data.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Metla
19-03-2007, 11:34 PM
Dont I always say Listen to the words of Billy?

No?

Ok, This time then.

He speaks wise words, Ignore them at your peril.

PSU is heap big cheap.

qazwsxokmijn
20-03-2007, 08:56 AM
My problem is that now I am phobic to uninstalling my old PSU and reinstalling the new one. So the only way I could get the QMB tech to install it for me is if I go there. The second problem is that I can't go there because my father, my only means of mobility, works from 4pm-12am every weekdays and won't have time before 4pm due to other commitments.

I'll just have to see what I can do.

JJJJJ
20-03-2007, 10:11 AM
My advice. (for what it's worth). If the comp's running OK now, just leave it alone and enjoy it while you can.
Wait until it stops working. Then start over again. That's the time to worry.

SolMiester
20-03-2007, 01:15 PM
Well, if you warned your old man about drilling holes above the psu, and it does fail, you have cause to go to him for replacement.

You could just take jacks advice and ignore the issue altogether.

I know what I'd be doing...

SurferJoe46
20-03-2007, 01:22 PM
The dad might have just drilled a hole in something that is limping along too for a while...like a capacitor, or a toroid coil...and these might not show up for a while....but they will!

Might've even knocked off an aux rail...and if it's not being used right now..it MIGHT go for a while before it drags another rail down with it.

Sparks are never a good thing no matter what the source unless you a setting off fireworks or trying to light a fire.

Not IF, but WHEN.

And youse guys are on 240 volts too...egads! :eek:

bob_doe_nz
20-03-2007, 01:38 PM
My problem is that now I am phobic to uninstalling my old PSU and reinstalling the new one. So the only way I could get the QMB tech to install it for me is if I go there. The second problem is that I can't go there because my father, my only means of mobility, works from 4pm-12am every weekdays and won't have time before 4pm due to other commitments.

I'll just have to see what I can do.
QMB are open on Saturdays too you know.

Otherwise take the Bus. Or I'm assuming you want to take the whole system along? And not just the PSU itself...

qazwsxokmijn
20-03-2007, 04:49 PM
Yeah, I've decided to buy a new PSU and get QMB to install and test it instead of me.

BTW, I am buying Task PSU. Task 550W. Is Task a good brand? Seems like a lot of Tasks are going around these days....