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View Full Version : cordless keyboard/mouse recomendations??



tingle
04-02-2007, 02:24 PM
i have searched the forum here and the only thing i can find on this subject is a bit out of date.
any preferences or hates??
my corded combo works ok, but was wondering if these new fangled things are any better... or worse...

as always, many thanks for any advice:thumbs:
Cheers!

Erayd
04-02-2007, 04:03 PM
Logitech EX111 keyboard, and the LX5 mouse.

The EX111 comes with its own mouse, but that one's rubbish. The LX5 works fine with the EX111 receiver.

EX110 is the same keyboard, but in black rather than white.

Shortcircuit
04-02-2007, 04:12 PM
I'm currently using a Logitech MX1000 laser mouse... the best I've had by far. Constant use all day, every day and batts last weeks, nice feel, very accurate 10/10

Also using a logitech Di Novo keyboard, the newer 'standard' cordless version, but I've had the bluetooth model before that which died and couldn't be replaced. I like the Di Novo keyboard, nice touch to the keys but in the end just a keyboard, so 6/10. I also bought the cordless Logitech S510 but didn't like it at all 3/10.

Haven't tried any others like MSoft sorry :(

pctek
04-02-2007, 08:30 PM
Logitech rules.


I hate cordless though..........batteries........

Dannz
04-02-2007, 08:33 PM
I hate cordless though..........batteries........
I agree there.
I go through a set of batteries in my keyboard every 2 weeks or so. and every month in the mouse.

somebody
04-02-2007, 09:01 PM
Microsoft mice last ages in terms of battery life. A friend of mine had one which he would change the batteries in every 3 months (using normal Alkaline cells). My one at the moment has been running for well over a month on a single AA battery - it's rated to last 6months.

I have an A4Tech wireless keyboard, which I haven't changed the battery in for well over 6 months... if not longer. The cordless mouse made by them goes through a set of batteries every 3 days though.

The_End_Of_Reality
04-02-2007, 09:34 PM
I have a Logitech G7 and it is great :D comes with its own rechargeable batterys, so batterys are no problem, they last about 24 hours of constant usage.

And the range on it is huge, I can be a few rooms down and it still picks it up clear and pefect, just as if I were at the PC :D

Shortcircuit
05-02-2007, 12:21 PM
The MX1000 is built-in rechargeable with nice little green/red LEDs on the side of the mouse to show the charge. :thumbs:

RealBigDog
05-02-2007, 12:44 PM
Wacom tablets have cordless pen and mouse which don't use batteries.

Plus, you won't get carpal tunnel using a pen.

I use my pen except when I have to use a mouse for gaming, and it's much faster than using a mouse once you get used to it.

On the other cordless keyboards/mice--I'm a gamer, and when I've tried the other wireless keyboards and mice that use batteries, I've noticed a slight delay (okay, extremely slight, but when your life depends on milliseconds response, it's important, lol) in the response to my actions.

Don't notice any delay on the Wacom, though, I guess because it's not using rf transmission of the signal.

Shortcircuit
05-02-2007, 12:50 PM
Wacom tablets have cordless pen and mouse which don't use batteries.


Don't notice any delay on the Wacom, though, I guess because it's not using rf transmission of the signal.

I guess it recharges using the earth's magnetic field and is also psychic as it requires neither batteries or rf transmissions.

Nah- let me guess, the cord's just so you don't loose it :thumbs:

RealBigDog
05-02-2007, 01:03 PM
I guess it recharges using the earth's magnetic field and is also psychic as it requires neither batteries or rf transmissions.

Nah- let me guess, the cord's just so you don't loose it :thumbs:

As Will Rogers said, "We're all ignorant, just about different things."

From Wikipedia:


Wacom tablets use a patented electromagnetic resonance technology. Since the tablet provides power to the pen through resonant coupling, no batteries or cords are required. As a result, there are no batteries inside the pen that will run down and need to be replaced, creating a long and virtually maintenance free lifespan.

Under the tablet’s surface (or LCD in the case of the Cintiq) is a grid of wires that transmits a send and receive signal. In send mode, the tablet’s electromagnetic signal stimulates oscillation in the pen’s coil-and-capacitor circuit. In receive mode, the energy of the resonant circuit’s oscillations in the pen is detected by the tablet’s grid. This information is then analyzed by the computer to determine the pen’s position. In addition, the pen communicates other vital information, such as pressure-sensitivity, side-switch status, tip or eraser orientation and Tool ID. For example, applying more or less pressure to the tip of the pen changes the value of the pen’s timing circuit capacitor. This signal change is communicated to a modulator which distributes the information digitally to the tablet. The tablet forwards this and other relevant information (pen position, side-switch status, Tool ID, etc.) in packets, up to 200 times per second, to the computer.