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Greven
21-01-2007, 05:13 PM
I needed a power strip yesterday, so I went down to The Warehouse & bought a 6 plug elto one for about $6. It is a horrible power strip - things don't plug in properly without a lot of wriggling & forcing the plug :mad:.

What is the cheapest brand of decent power strips, and where do you buy them from?

somebody
21-01-2007, 05:18 PM
I bought a cheap "Results" branded one from Mitre10 early last year - works fine, just like a brand-name one.

sroby
22-01-2007, 12:51 PM
PDL, available from hardware stores.

Graham L
23-01-2007, 02:56 PM
"cheap" and "good" ... ? Most of the cheap ones don't have actual sockets ... they have strips of thin brass bent to form occasional contact with plugs. Running 10 amps through one "socket" usually causes enough heat to melt the case.

I look out for proper power strips at auctions. They have metal cases, and real individual sockets (like the ones on electric stoves).

Greven
23-01-2007, 06:29 PM
"cheap" and "good" ... ? Most of the cheap ones don't have actual sockets ... they have strips of thin brass bent to form occasional contact with plugs. Running 10 amps through one "socket" usually causes enough heat to melt the case.

I look out for proper power strips at auctions. They have metal cases, and real individual sockets (like the ones on electric stoves).

They sound expensive. how much do they usually cost?

tweak'e
23-01-2007, 06:38 PM
its not the cost its the advailability. try finding the good ones.

unfortunatly most manafactures only make the cheap type. a lot only have a contact on one side or very thin contacts which become loose very quickly. a loose contact will over heat, melt the plastic and can catch on fire.

Graham L
24-01-2007, 03:48 PM
The cheap ones are probably OK for a bunch of things which pull 5-20 watts, but anything which actually uses amps is best given a good connector. It's probably a good idea to get IEC cords with tapon plugs to feed computer boxes and laser printers. Then you can plug a power strip in the back of the tapon for the rest of the rubbish like modems, inkjet printers, etc.

Greven
24-01-2007, 06:07 PM
The cheap ones are probably OK for a bunch of things which pull 5-20 watts, but anything which actually uses amps is best given a good connector. It's probably a good idea to get IEC cords with tapon plugs to feed computer boxes and laser printers. Then you can plug a power strip in the back of the tapon for the rest of the rubbish like modems, inkjet printers, etc.

IEC? :confused:

Graham L
25-01-2007, 02:13 PM
IEC power cords look like this (www.dynamix.co.nz/productimages/pdfs/page096.pdf). Look at the ones with the "C-POWERCT" code for what a tapon looks like.

personthingy
26-01-2007, 06:13 PM
I needed a power strip yesterday, so I went down to The Warehouse & bought a 6 plug elto one for about $6. It is a horrible power strip - things don't plug in properly without a lot of wriggling & forcing the plug :mad:.I bought cheaper ones than that from the warehouse a year or more ago, and use them behind my audio equipment (in a rack) and my son uses 2 for his part of our computer network.
They were fine UNLESS used in an environment where things are going to get moved, or a non low draw appliance is used. In those situations, i have either installed more sockets on the wall, or done as Graham has advised.

cromwell
05-02-2007, 03:09 PM
For a computer, I find it best to invest in a good power strip. Cheap power strips are for irons, fans and the like. I think they come in different 'grades.' This guide to power strips (http://www.pickyguide.com/computers_and_software/power_strips_guide.html) might be helpful. :)

wellyg33k
05-02-2007, 04:27 PM
Don't risk it.. buy a decent mid-range power strip from DSE. The really cheap ones are so dodgy.. I've had a few spark when plugging in electronics..

personthingy
05-02-2007, 05:42 PM
..... I've had a few spark when plugging in electronics..Generally one gets sparks when connecting a load to a live power source.. This is irrelevant. It shows that the power is live, and that the appliance is taking some up. If this bothers you, turn the power off before plugging things in like you should if you care for safety. Sparks that happen when an appliance is plugged in is the only ones i would worry about.

Also, the concept of cheap is fine for irons... hmmm... Irons draw a reasonable amount, so poor contact means hot contact means fire risk.

wellyg33k
05-02-2007, 08:05 PM
Generally one gets sparks when connecting a load to a live power source.. This is irrelevant. It shows that the power is live, and that the appliance is taking some up. If this bothers you, turn the power off before plugging things in like you should if you care for safety. Sparks that happen when an appliance is plugged in is the only ones i would worry about.

Also, the concept of cheap is fine for irons... hmmm... Irons draw a reasonable amount, so poor contact means hot contact means fire risk.

Thats good to know.. I'm the overly paranoid type.

personthingy
05-02-2007, 10:18 PM
For a computer, I find it best to invest in a good power strip. Cheap power strips are for irons, fans and the like. I think they come in different 'grades.' This guide to power strips (http://null) might be helpful. :)
Cromwell, in NZ, where PF1 is based, we use a 230volt power system, and the 110V power strip guide is therefore not too relevant for us
:(