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View Full Version : What LCD monitor for photography?



R.M.
02-01-2007, 07:27 PM
Hi all

I've seen somewhere last year recommendations for 19in LCD monitors. I use mine for photography, using Photoshop and need (would like!!) as accurate colour as possible. I know people still recommend CRT monitors, but they take up so much room (especially at the 19inch size).

I seem to have a recollection that Benq might be one, also perhaps a Phillips. Can anyone help?

As always, TIA.
Cheers
R.M.

Speedy Gonzales
02-01-2007, 07:36 PM
I use a DSE and a CMV 19'. Both look fine when u view photos.

R.M.
02-01-2007, 07:47 PM
Thanks for that Speedy. :)

I'm just reading the recommendations in Dec/Jan's PC World - a Hyundai or a LG Flatron(big differences in prices - the Hyundai at $440 & the LG at $849).

When I say photography - I mean 'fiddling' in photoshop, and hopefully to get out of the printer what I see on the screen (and yes, there are all the problems of callibration etc.... to think about).

Speedy Gonzales
02-01-2007, 07:56 PM
I would say, it wld depend on the printer, and the kind of paper u use.

More than the monitor.

Like this is a

snapshot (http://www.imagef1.net.nz/files/plant.jpg) of the tulips background pic on this monitor.

R.M.
02-01-2007, 08:02 PM
Nice pic. :)

I use Canon gear and Canon paper, in an attempt to get some consistency, but then I've had quite good results too with Ilford paper.

The 'Photographic pundits' all seem to favour Epson printers and paper. However, at this stage I have too much money invested in Canon to change!

Speedy Gonzales
02-01-2007, 08:11 PM
The HP photo printers (the small ones with the card reader on them) are great for photos. These are the size of normal photos.

Only thing is, I don't think they're that great with anything other than HP photo paper. BUT, what these print out, they actually like photos. I liked it, coz u didn't have to connect it to a PC to use it. If u had a digicam and a memory card.

But yup, I used to have an Epson, till it decided not to print one day lol.

So, that went in the bin. Then I got a Lexmark, then a brother MFC.

Coz I haven't got that much space on this desk, for a separate printer/scanner etc

Which, I haven't yet tried to print a photo on it. To see whats its like.

beeswax34
02-01-2007, 08:43 PM
My Maya 19 inch widescreen monitor gotten for $300 is absolutely fantastic. The colours are quite vivid and the contrast is very good as well, not to mention dirt-cheap as well.

Metla
02-01-2007, 09:00 PM
need (would like!!) as accurate colour as possible.

Seeing as this is entirely dependant on your printer, Get a colour graph off the net,print it out, Hold it up beside your screen (or tape it to it, not on the viewable surface though) and dial in your display as close as you can get.

Though that wont mean "real world" colour, merely that what your looking at on screen will be close to what gets printed. I have heard of companies doing a weekly check on colour adjustment after large jobs were sent off to be printed and the end result was far different then what the "professional" was seeing on there rig.

Nomad
02-01-2007, 09:24 PM
If you want calibration for printer and monitor - have a look at Eye One Photo. It sticks on monitor and printouts and give you a custom ICC (one for monitor and the other for printer). Photoshop will utilise these ICC files. Although software like internet browsers will not, Photoshop Elements will.

LCD can be calibrated with the sensors these days.
As for the LCDs, it does get $$, when you talk about color accuracy "as possible" you are looking at Apple and Lacie and probably Sony but I have not seen monitor on LCDs yet for these pro calibre ones.

For calibration monitor is "the" most important. You have to see before you walk or you would bump into a wall. For printing printers provide ICC while they are not custom made to your specific sample it is one nevertheless and if the sensor is too expensive you can send print charts out to a company and they can make you a ICC file for your specific printer sample. If you are using professional labs, some provide this ICC file downloadable online.

For these look at drycreekphoto.com and they have a database of ICC to be downloaded, NZ has a few available, if up to date is a different issue.


http://www.nikonians.org/html/resources/non-nikon_articles/gretamacbeth/i1review1.html

With calibration what you want is you have used a calibrated monitor. If you email this to a lab or a photography friend they should also have a calibrated monitor, what they see on their machine should be approx what you see on your screen. These devices are hardware based so they do not rely on the human for color judgement.

Nomad
02-01-2007, 09:33 PM
I don't shop in NZ as they can be v $$. They are available thou.
Ones to scan printers and monitors around $650USD.
The one for monitor alone can be $200USD. Printer test chart can be sent out to be done for you, say one per paper you use ie .. gloss and matte. They around $150 in Auckland I think. Details can be had in NZ photography mags.

winmacguy
02-01-2007, 09:47 PM
Hi all

I've seen somewhere last year recommendations for 19in LCD monitors. I use mine for photography, using Photoshop and need (would like!!) as accurate colour as possible. I know people still recommend CRT monitors, but they take up so much room (especially at the 19inch size).

I seem to have a recollection that Benq might be one, also perhaps a Phillips. Can anyone help?

As always, TIA.
Cheers
R.M.
I hate to say this but Apple monitors are actually the industry standard for colour accuracy for viewing PMS colours and photography work which is probably why Mac Op photo re-touchers tend to work with them. Depends on whether you want to print your photos at home or send them to a professional printing press for commercial work. It pays to get the colour accuracy confirmed at or before the proofing stage so that you don't get any rude shocks when the job comes off the press.

winmacguy
02-01-2007, 10:07 PM
$1349 for 20inch Apple monitor (works on a PC as well)
20-inch (viewable)
1680 x 1050 optimal resolution
16.7 million colors
DVI Display Connector
2 port USB 2.0 Hub
2 FireWire 400 ports

VESA mount compatible
Ideal for photography and photo retouching.

Speedy Gonzales
02-01-2007, 10:25 PM
Whatever u do, don't get an interlaced monitor.

winmacguy
02-01-2007, 11:30 PM
This would be the one time when choosing a budget monitor to save some $$ could come back to bite you in the ass.

Nomad
02-01-2007, 11:39 PM
LCD may be $$. Cheapskates like me would get a 2nd hand Sony CRT and a calibrator :D For a non job, does not need too be a graphics pro calibre one but it does need to be a consumer top tier one. Def not Benq, DSE etc ......

All the big brands will have these higher ended offerings.
Don't assume big screens must be good - many kids look for affirdable big screens for games and movies.

Nomad
02-01-2007, 11:45 PM
A pro Sony CRT, v highly regarded. Not those stuff in Sony store or Dell/IBM w/ trinitron tubes.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/accessories/sony-artisan.shtml

http://luminous-landscape.com/reviews/displays.shtml

winmacguy
02-01-2007, 11:51 PM
I guess it depends on the importance in the degree of colour accuracy that you want. Is it just personal interest or will it mean the difference between being paid or paying for the job out of your own pocket.

I agree with Nomad regarding the Sony Pro CRT monitors. :)

R.M.
03-01-2007, 08:19 AM
Though that wont mean "real world" colour, merely that what your looking at on screen will be close to what gets printed. I have heard of companies doing a weekly check on colour adjustment after large jobs were sent off to be printed and the end result was far different then what the "professional" was seeing on there rig.

Yes - I try to do that - with varying degrees of success!

R.M.
03-01-2007, 08:23 AM
If you want calibration for printer and monitor - have a look at Eye One Photo.

Great reply, but beyond me financially I think.

R.M.
03-01-2007, 08:26 AM
I hate to say this but Apple monitors are actually the industry standard for colour accuracy.

One of my sons would totally agree with this - the other is a PC man!

R.M.
03-01-2007, 08:29 AM
Thanks to all for the replies. Lots of food for thought amongst that - but probabably about what I thought/expected.

BTW - I see the LG Flatron monitor recommended in PC World for $849 is now available for $650. That seems to be good news.:)

Cheers
R.M.

winmacguy
03-01-2007, 10:07 AM
Thanks to all for the replies. Lots of food for thought amongst that - but probabably about what I thought/expected.

BTW - I see the LG Flatron monitor recommended in PC World for $849 is now available for $650. That seems to be good news.:)

Cheers
R.M.
On a side note. If you looking to do a bit of self improvement in Photoshop I can suggest a couple excellent books one of which is called Commercial Photoshop by Bert Monroy. You can get them from Amazon.com or any Borders book store. They retail for about $100 NZ and next to the Photoshop WOW series I would regard them as my bible.
Bert Monroy is an Adobe fellow who has helped with the development of Photoshop since its inception.
Regards winmacguy

Nomad
03-01-2007, 10:56 AM
Great reply, but beyond me financially I think.

What about a high end consumer monitor. Get a colorimeter than a spectrophotometer but it cannot scan printouts, it can do monitors. One good one is a Monaco Optix I think, a cheaper one is a Colorvision Spyder from $150usd or check eBay. Postal won't be a lot and if $400nzd maybe incl postage you won't get import tax as GST amounts to less than $50nzd. Great thing is they can be used to profile many monitors if you have more than (1) and if you upgrade monitor over time they can be reused (unless drivers become an issue for new windows etc..).

To calibrate printer use the supplied ICC files or print one test chart and send to a local NZ company to have it done or ones in the USA can also make one for you around $60USD, NZ around $100-150. If you use one paper only need one to be made. They will email you the files, or in NZ they may send you a diskette or such. If you want it cheaper, go abroad, search for "Cathy's Profiles". "Drycreekphoto.com" also does it but a bit more expensive, there are also established companies in this area which is even more such as "inkjetmall.com".

If you want to use a lab, I know www.pcl.co.nz has a supplied ICC for you online if you want to use their printing services.

R.M.
03-01-2007, 11:04 AM
Thanks for that Nomad - I'll do some research with that. :)

beetle
03-01-2007, 11:12 AM
Speedy what do you mean interlaced monitor?

:rolleyes:

beetle

Speedy Gonzales
03-01-2007, 11:44 AM
Speedy what do you mean interlaced monitor?

:rolleyes:

beetle

Its like hi-res, I think most apple monitors are interlaced.

Or people who are into CAD / desktop publishing.

Its like it flickers. And watching one of these screens for a while, can be hard on the eyes.

If you know anyone who's a MAC user / into CAD or DTP and the monitor they use, you'll see what I mean.

winmacguy
03-01-2007, 12:27 PM
interlaced display explained

An interlaced GIF is something different.

An interlaced display is a cathode-ray tube (CRT) display in which the lines are scanned alternately in two interwoven rasterized lines.

In a CRT display, there are several hundred horizontal lines in a frame (full screen). These lines are scanned from left to right, and from top to bottom. The refresh rate (number of frames scanned per second) varies, but it is normally between 60 and 100 hertz. Refresh rates slower than 60 Hz produce distracting screen flicker, which can cause headaches and eye fatigue.

Most CRT computer monitors scan each line in turn from top to bottom at the lowest resolution levels (640 x 480 and 800 x 600 pixels). However, at the higher resolutions, such as 1024 x 768 or 1200 x 800, the frame is sometimes scanned in interlaced fashion: first the odd-numbered lines, and then the even-numbered lines. This allows for a lower refresh rate without producing flicker. With text and fixed graphics displays, this scheme can work well. However, with animated graphics -- especially images that move or change form rapidly -- interlacing can produce a fluttering effect at least as irritating as screen flicker.

For serious animated-graphics work and video editing, a non-interlaced display is recommended. The refresh rate should be as high as the system will allow, ideally 70 Hz or more.

Hope that helps.

winmacguy
03-01-2007, 12:30 PM
Its like hi-res, I think most apple monitors are interlaced.

Or people who are into CAD / desktop publishing.

Its like it flickers. And watching one of these screens for a while, can be hard on the eyes.

If you know anyone who's a MAC user / into CAD or DTP and the monitor they use, you'll see what I mean.

A Mac users screen only flickers if the hertz are set too low. The last thing us Mac operators need is to get headaches and dizzyness after an 8 hour day designing.

The difference between designers screen and a gamers screen is that gamers need the highest possible fps rate rather than the highest optical definition of an image so each is ideally suited to their own requirements.

MAC is an acronym for Media Access Controller.
Fluorecent tubes can also cause eye irritaition from flickering.