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Bryden
27-12-2006, 08:44 PM
Hi Experts....

I have grandchildren in the UK and want to read some NZ stories so that I can write them to CD. What equipment and gadgets would you suggest would be best to use please?

I went to Warehouse Stationery today and they suggested I visited Dick Smith Powerhouse - haven't done that so far but was a bit intrigued to be directed to the opposition! VBG

TIA

Bryden

SurferJoe46
27-12-2006, 08:56 PM
For the times when I do that..I just use Audacity to record the sounds I speak into the microphone, and save the selected file as an MP3 on the harddrive and then burn it onto a cd-rom.

With Audacity you can edit and amplify and create sound effects and switch sequences of voice/data to your heart's content. You can even add music in the background with extra tracks and synch them as you see fit...

Sometimes for fun I put the MP3 on a mini disk..a smaller version of a regular cd-rom..the kinds you get for vid recorders work just fine..and they mail or carry in smaller packages.

Enjoy!

Bryden
27-12-2006, 09:04 PM
Audacity - haven't searched yet but is this a download, or a programme you buy? Microphones etc. - anything I should watch out for or are they just basic? This is a new arena for me though a lot of other computer things I am quite familiar with...

TIA

Renmoo
27-12-2006, 09:12 PM
Hi Bryden. You would need to have a microphone in the first place, or you can use the voice-recording function of some digital camera or cellphone to record down the stories as you speak. There was a desk-mounted microphone sold at Botany Downs Bond & Bond or DSE for about 20 bucks a few weeks ago.

DSE Powerhouse is only available at Hamilton and Manukau. I guess you are living near to either one of those two locations? :)

P.S. Don't forget to omit NZ accent as you dictate the stories; it might be a little hard to understand for an English. :P

Cheers :)

The_End_Of_Reality
27-12-2006, 09:14 PM
Audacity is a free download, Google it.

I have a Logitech headset that I use, it is about $50 but it is good

zqwerty
27-12-2006, 09:16 PM
Audacity is free, you can get from here:

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Bryden
27-12-2006, 09:31 PM
Thanks so much for the replies.... Will check out the microphones...

I live in Cambridge so Hamilton Powerhouse is a regular stop off...

As for the Kiwi accent - I am English, so don't have one! VBG

Renmoo
27-12-2006, 09:59 PM
Hi again, Bryden. To be honest, I am half-surprised that there are still people out there dictating stories to their children and grand-children, given that the world has now been hijacked by technology. :D

Anyway, it is good to know that some family traditions are still in existent today. :)

Cheers :)

drcspy
28-12-2006, 05:18 AM
any mic should do really......and audacity is a very good program....

Bryden
28-12-2006, 05:37 PM
Well I did record some stories on to tape for my little ones and they still play them at night when they go to bed. When you live at such a distance it is important to keep the contact going....

BTW you should have used the word "existence".... VBG

Bryden

Renmoo
28-12-2006, 10:20 PM
Well I did record some stories on to tape for my little ones and they still play them at night when they go to bed. When you live at such a distance it is important to keep the contact going....

BTW you should have used the word "existence".... VBG

Bryden
Thanks for the correction, Bryden. :)

Cheers :)

R2x1
28-12-2006, 10:44 PM
JamesKan. . . it might be a little hard to understand for an English. :P
Maybe "for an English person." Or "for an English native." ;)

SurferJoe46
29-12-2006, 05:18 AM
Maybe "for an English person." Or "for an English native." ;)

I don't know...I'd say it like this:

".....for an English-speaking person" or

"...for an English-speaking, native born person"

I don't think a person is really "English" much any more as there seems to be a social distinction now to being "British";

......and "English native" sounds like it might be a Druid who hid away for the last few centuries and was just spotted in a cafe in Wandsworth SW-18.

Greg
29-12-2006, 07:10 AM
Bryden - keep in mind you don't have to download Audacity or anything. Windows has its own built-in recording application.

SurferJoe46
29-12-2006, 07:17 AM
Bryden - keep in mind you don't have to download Audacity or anything. Windows has its own built-in recording application.

I think Windows recorder is limited in file size and only records in .wav formats...but I might be wrong as the times I tried it I got tired of it really fast and used Audacity.

Greg
29-12-2006, 08:02 AM
Well if she's going to do frequent recordings then yeah, would be worth getting it.

Renmoo
29-12-2006, 10:00 AM
Maybe "for an English person." Or "for an English native." ;)



I don't think a person is really "English" much any more as there seems to be a social distinction now to being "British";

Hi R2-D2 (did you watch Star Wars yesterday night?;) ). What I really meant to say was "an English" (that is, someone from UK), and not someone who is able to speak English; otherwise I wouldn't have raise the issue on NZ accent might be hard for someone from UK to comprehend.

Sorry for hijacking this thread, Bryden. Hope you are making good progress there!

Cheers :)

R2x1
29-12-2006, 10:17 AM
Gd'day James, Arrgghh - I missed Star Wars last night. I only flick the TV on maybe twice a week, and so I missed the highlight of the year ;)
Calling a person "an English" seems a bit Amish to me ;) Poms is pretty unambiguous to us, but Joe's neighbours would probably be puzzled. Some "English" resent being called Poms, others prefer it. I'm blowed if I know the reason for either attitude, any more than I understand the origin of the word. Maybe it's similar to the dislike some Aucklanders have for being called J-A-F-A-S while others (including me) don't worry.

Greg
29-12-2006, 10:23 AM
I spent 3 years in the UK and found they prefer to refer to themselves and for others to refer to them as Brits.

Renmoo
29-12-2006, 12:53 PM
Gd'day James, Arrgghh - I missed Star Wars last night. I only flick the TV on maybe twice a week, and so I missed the highlight of the year ;)
Calling a person "an English" seems a bit Amish to me ;) Poms is pretty unambiguous to us, but Joe's neighbours would probably be puzzled. Some "English" resent being called Poms, others prefer it. I'm blowed if I know the reason for either attitude, any more than I understand the origin of the word. Maybe it's similar to the dislike some Aucklanders have for being called J-A-F-A-S while others (including me) don't worry.
J@F@ is a negative connotation for Aucklanders, isn't it (just like Irish dislike being called paddy)? On the other hand, don't you call someone from England "English"?

I guess I will stick to "British" then, Greg.

P.S. There is still another episode of Star Wars tonight on TV3 :D

Cheers :)

SurferJoe46
29-12-2006, 04:54 PM
Funny..."paddy" is a name the Afro-Americans call caucasians here.....not being Irish and being called paddy is kinda strange...but it never meant much to me.

Paddy Joe, token white guy.