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garyasta
20-12-2006, 03:09 PM
Hi

I currently run a standard desktop PC but have recently purchased a laptop.

It is intended that the laptop will be the main computer, linked via satellite (Ipstar) to the internet. As the PC has 95G in two HD's, I would like to utilise this 95G as storage with only minor functional usage. It would not be directly connected (or indirectly) connected to the internet and would only be used intermitently. It has it's own WinXP SP2 Home OS as does the laptop.

How complex (don't frighten me) would it be to set up a basic link between the two computers so that the PC can be used mainly as backup and storage of rarely used applications.

A slimmer more racy laptop might then eventuate???

Cheers
Gary

Erayd
20-12-2006, 03:21 PM
Setting up a network for these devices should be relatively simple provided you follow the correct steps. Can you give some more details about your setup? Useful info includes things like:

Is your satellite connection connected to the laptop via ethernet or USB?

Is your satellite modem also a router - i.e. is it capable of performing NAT? A good way to check this is to look at the IP address of your laptop - if it's a private address, then it's a router.

Do you have a device capable of acting as a DHCP server?

Also just out of curiosity, how did you solve your phone issue?

garyasta
20-12-2006, 05:32 PM
Hi Bletch

Thanks for your response.

I presume your enquiry regarding the phone issue relates to my question re being able to have the laptop emerge from hybernation if a VoIP call should come in via satellite. The short answer is that it appears that it could take too long to wake up the laptop even if there was some sort of trigger.

"Is your satellite connection connected to the laptop via ethernet or USB?"

I presume that the connection from the IPSTAR router (?), which is a cable, would be USB, although the connection to the laptop is similar to a 'phone connector.

"Is your satellite modem also a router - i.e. is it capable of performing NAT? A good way to check this is to look at the IP address of your laptop - if it's a private address, then it's a router."

I can't check the IP address of the laptop (I am currently in Auckland and the satellite dish is in Kaitaia) and I am unsure as to what NAT stands for. I presume that the ID of my laptop is noted by the ISP via the satellite when the IPSTAR console (at Kaitaia) is switched on and the connection between Kaitaia and the IP is made.

When I switch on the satellite connector/router, the broadband transmission connection is completed through the laptop and normal internet plus VoIP upload/downloads take place.

"Do you have a device capable of acting as a DHCP server?"

Once again, I am unsure of the meaning of DHCP.

I have no wish for the PC to be connected to the internet. I am hoping that it can be set up only as an extra set of HD's that can be fed from the laptop and perceived as an extra set of drives. Once data has been transferred from the laptop, it can then be processed or stored in the PC and read/transferred back to the laptop at another time.

Cheers
Gary

winmacguy
20-12-2006, 06:21 PM
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol if my memory for acronyms serves me correctly
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_Host_Configuration_Protocol

trig42
20-12-2006, 09:11 PM
I presume that the connection from the IPSTAR router (?), which is a cable, would be USB, although the connection to the laptop is similar to a 'phone connector.

The 'Phone Connector' is a network cable, not a USB one, it should be approximately twice as wide as a phone plug.

If the IPStar device is a router (which it sounds as if it may be) it will be performing DHCP and NAT (Network Address translation) Which means that it will be acting sort of like a 'bridge' between your internal network (what is connected on your side of the router) and the external network (the internet). It will have assigned your laptop it's own internal IP address (something like 192.168.1.2, or 10.1.1.2 etc) you can check this by going to command prompt (run -> cmd) and typing ipconfig /all

Anyhoo,
If you have got a router, and it has got more than one network socket in it (more than one place to plug a PC into), then this will do all the hard networking work for you, it will automatically put your two PCs onto the same network, and from there, you can do your backups/file storage etc.
If your router hasn't got more than one plug, then to network, you'll need a switch (you can't go direct from laptop to PC, as by the sounds of it, your laptops network card is already connected to your IPStar router). If you get a cheap 5 port switch, you can plug the router and the two PCs into that, and it will do the same as mentioned above.

If your IPStar device is not a router, or doesn't perform NAT and DHCP, then all the above is irrelevant.

A simpler solution may be to buy a USB storage stick and use sneaker-net to transfer the files from one PC to the other.

garyasta
21-12-2006, 08:47 AM
Hi Guys

Thanks for the info. I'll check the system out this weekend.

The info supplied has helped me to understand the situation better and after this weekend I should have a better idea of the setup.

If I still can't 'thought' things out.... I'll be baaack!

Cheers
Gary