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supersi
29-11-2006, 11:08 AM
My out of warranty iPod 20gb hard drive has died. I'm going to have a go replacing the hard drive.
I don't want to pay somebody else to fix it so I was wondering where I can get replacement hard drives from in NZ?

Speedy Gonzales
29-11-2006, 01:02 PM
Look on Apple NZ's site (www.apple.co.nz)

Or contact them.

Billy T
29-11-2006, 01:59 PM
My out of warranty iPod 20gb hard drive has died. I'm going to have a go replacing the hard drive.If you purchased it in NZ it is too new to be out of reach of the "reasonable life" provisions of the CGA. Apple cannot opt out of the CGA and nor can their resellers. Soo, if it is under two years old that is a premature failure and the drive should be replaced without charge.

Don't let them try to bullsh*t you into accepting anything less. Be prepared to wear incidental costs such as shipping to them, but the rest should be free and is enforceable at law.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

trinsic
29-11-2006, 02:06 PM
If you purchased it in NZ it is too new to be out of reach of the "reasonable life" provisions of the CGA. Apple cannot opt out of the CGA and nor can their resellers. Soo, if it is under two years old that is a premature failure and the drive should be replaced without charge.

Don't let them try to bullsh*t you into accepting anything less. Be prepared to wear incidental costs such as shipping to them, but the rest should be free and is enforceable at law.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

If only I knew this when my iPod did the same thing. So even though the warrenty has run out (1 year) it can still be returned if you follow CGA rules?

Billy T
29-11-2006, 02:47 PM
If only I knew this when my iPod did the same thing. So even though the warrenty has run out (1 year) it can still be returned if you follow CGA rules?Read Here (http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/consumerinfo/cga/index.html) and look at "durability".

I can never understand how otherwise intelligent people can know so little about their consumer rights. :confused:

I have saved many thousands of dollars over the years simply by knowing what my reasonable entitlements were. I find that most retailers and suppliers are quite happy to meet their obligations, you need only ask.

Three key requirements: Politeness, Persistence, and Patience.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

pctek
29-11-2006, 02:49 PM
Read [url=http://www.consumeraffairs.govt.nz/consumerinfo/cga/index.html] Here I find that most retailers and suppliers are quite happy to meet their obligations, you need only ask.

key requirements: Persistence


Most are happy for you to remain ignorant.
But I agree with that key requirement.

trinsic
29-11-2006, 03:09 PM
My iPod lasted me 2 years. Dunno if I would say reasonable as a mp3 player (I still have my 5 year old mp3 player) but for a iPod it is common. I have seen far too many last only 2 years.

Is $600 reasonable for 2 years :\

Misty
29-11-2006, 05:43 PM
my 20 Gig 4th generation iPod died after 13 months. Fortunately however I had taken out an extended warranty and had it replaced no bother at all. Nevertheless I would have taken them to task even if I did not have the extended warranty :annoyed:

Billy T's approach is your best bet if all the alternatives have gone !! :thumbs:

I take it that you have tried everything. My click-wheel froze and re-setting did not work. However if you have the same problem then re-setting may well work. What has actually happened with it ?
Misty

Billy T
29-11-2006, 07:25 PM
Is $600 reasonable for 2 years :\Definitely not! Battery and cosmetics aside, and assuming no physical abuse (dropping, operating controls with toes or other implements of destruction etc) the rest of the player should be functioning normally. For $600 I would expect 4-5 years of reliable use. You could only expect pro-rata support after two years though, i.e if the HDD failed at 3 years you could expect to pay between 40% and 60% of the cost of the replacement drive, or be offered a very good deal on the purchase of a new player.

In my view, a failure within 2 years is clear evidence of a manufacturing defect and the HDD should be replaced free of charge. I don't object to paying freight one-way, but I expect return freight to be paid.

I recently went though a difficult patch myself with a 10GB MP3 player purchase (brand best kept anonymous). The first one was incomplete when the box was opened (no battery), and it could not be replaced because it was a runout model so the dealer offered me a subsidised upgrade to a newer model (they offered, I didn't ask).
However, when I got it home I found that it wouldn't work because I don't run XP, so it was returned for a refund. The importer then offered me a great deal on a brand new 20GB unit of an older model that worked with any OS and was perfect for my needs. I got it for the original price I paid for the 10GB unit.

All this from a couple of polite discussions with the original shop and a phone call to the distributor. And so it goes on.....

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

P.S. Mrs T hates it when I do that, she thinks I go in and bully them, but that never gets you anywhere, they'd just show you the door.

supersi
29-11-2006, 07:34 PM
How do I initiate a claim under the CGA? Also I don't have my receipts etc....
The iPod was dropped once about 12 months ago and has a scratch mark to show for it. It only started failing in the last week though.

Billy T
30-11-2006, 08:16 AM
How do I initiate a claim under the CGA? Also I don't have my receipts etc....
The iPod was dropped once about 12 months ago and has a scratch mark to show for it. It only started failing in the last week though.
You don't "initiate claims under the CGA", you make sure that you clearly understand your rights and the limitations on the sellers obligations (it is not open slather), then go back to the retailer and start a dialogue about reasonable life and ask them what they can do to help. If they say "nothing" then you remind them of their obligations under the CGA and tell them that their obligations do not end when the manufacturer's warranty expires. Remember the three P's and move up the feeding chain step by step if getting nowhere with the person you are dealing with.

You should always keep receipts and warranty documents, it is foolish in the extreme not to, and it costs nothing to toss them into a boxfile when you come home with your new toy. I keep all the original packing for a few weeks just to be on the safe side as well and it makes it much easier to negotiate a replacement if the item is returned in full packaging.

However, all is not lost, the sale can usually be tracked back in the store records via the serial number or your name. This doesn't help you much though, being too slack to provide proof of purchase and then expecting the store to do all the work is not exactly going to win you any friends.

IIRC, I wrote an extensive step by step process for somebody with a printer problem a few months back so do a forum search for that. For some reason I can never get a PF1 forum search to find any of my previous posts or anything else I search for, I have tried many times so there must be a trick to it. Either that or I am doing something horribly wrong so you are on your own there unless a forum searching expert can help you find it.

I rarely get a knock-back, and even then, if I say that I don't accept that opinion and ask to speak to their supervisor or manager I almost always get a result at that level. Unless you go for rock-bottom prices from minimal service organisations (Supercheap PC comes to mind) most sellers are interested in protecting their good name.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Billy T
30-11-2006, 05:30 PM
For some reason I can never get a PF1 forum search to find any of my previous posts or anything else I search for, I have tried many times so there must be a trick to it. Either that or I am doing something horribly wrong so you are on your own there unless a forum searching expert can help you find it.Well, I have to eat my words. :blush: I did a search and actually found the thread. Only problem is, I don't know what I did differently this time. Anyway, the following is an edited generic version of how to progress a warranty claim outside of the warranty period:

The member had a printer problem and wrote: Do you suggest I do some exploration of my own with the CGA, and how do I go about that?

My response follows:

OK.

1) Exactly how long have you had it?

2) Where did you buy it?

3) I assume it is for personal use, not business.



A reasonable life expectancy for an inkjet printer under domestic use would be 3-5 years. When bought from a retail outlet, and it fails prematurely, the retailer must repair or replace it. Manufacturer's or suppliers' policies are irrelevant, that's the seller's problem, not yours.

Take it back to the retailer/supplier, tell them that you think failure after XX months is not reasonable life expectancy and ask them what they can do for you. Don't rush in shouting the odds and telling them they have to replace it or else, or quoting the CGA at them. Very often you find that the response is very helpful and you'll feel a right dick if you have gone over the top with your initial enquiry.

If they want to keep it to inspect (promising) ask how long they will need it. A reasonable time for inspection would be 5 working days or less. Any longer, ask for a loan printer. You probably won't get one but you never know.

If cooperation runs out or doesn't even start, tell them (quietly) that the Consumer Guarantees Act overrides all manufacturer and/or importer guarantees as well as retailer policies, and that they must repair or replace the faulty item if it does not provide reasonable life under normal use.

At 3 to 6 months out of warranty, it should be repaired or replaced at no charge. After 25% of normal life expectancy you could expect to pay a small charge for wear and tear factor but in my opinion that should not be more than 25% of the cost of replacing it. These figures are arbitrary and are just my opinion. Always aim high, you never know your luck.

If the person you are dealing with does not have the discretionary power to help you, thank them politely for their efforts (however pitiful they may have been) then move up the supervisory/management chain. Introduce yourself by name each time. Always ask the name of the person you are dealing with and address them by name, e.g. Mr X, Mrs X or Ms X unless they just give you their christian name. This personalises the relationship and makes it harder for them to say no.

Unless dealing with a private company and talking to the owner, don't give up just because the branch manager says the buck stops with him or her and their decision is final. Look the company up in the phonebook and carry on up the tree.

As I am so fond of saying here, I have lost count of the items I have had replaced or repaired when out of warranty, including a car which was 12 months and 30,000ks out of warranty, printers, home appliances, cameras, you name it. Supermarkets and shops give refunds almost without question. I get very few knock-backs and people fall over themselves to help. (I am not female, blond or buxom either, so I'm not relying on hormone-driven sympathy.)

Apply the 3 P's at all times

Politeness, Persistence and Patience.

Actually, it's time to add a fourth P:

Preparation - know your rights!

There's a fifth P as well: Price, when you buy products in the first instance, don't just go for the bottom priced deal just to save a few dollars. Go for the cheapest deal from a reputable source, and if possible, one where the staff have an acceptable command of the english language. As just one example, DSE have great warranty policies and some of their specials can be very sharply priced, but there are many other good options.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

P.S. Ever tried to win an argument with an insurance company? I succeeded this week and got a $900 retrospective claim accepted and no excess! You don't ask, you don't get.

PPPP strikes again. :D