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rumpty
04-09-2006, 10:32 PM
I have (had) an IDE drive setup (dual boot) on my new computer motherboard which shows very peculiar behaviour. The master drive has Linux on its first partition, and the slave drive has XP on its first partition. Both drives on the same cable.

The bad effect from this setup is that accessing the slave drive partitions from within Windows, using My Computer or Explorer, is slowed down dramatically from normal, to the degree that "this program is not responding". Eventually things happen, but the computer is unusable, really. Windows cannot see the Linux drive in My Computer, of course.

If I swap the drives, The Linux drive then being the slave, Windows seems to behave normally. Has anyone else noticed this sort of behaviour?

cyber_rigger
05-09-2006, 05:58 AM
Here are some things to try.

1.
Try moving your secondary drive to the other cable.
You may have to modify you boot selector program

2.
Check your hard drive jumper settings,

* master single
* master with slave
* slave (with a master drive on the same cable)
* cable select, This requires that you actually have a "cable select" cable

A cable select cable usually has a tiny hole in it that clips one of the wires.
http://www.unixwiz.net/techtips/ide-cable-select.html
A master/slave cable doesn't have the clipped wire

Don't mix the master/slave parts with cable select parts.
When in doubt I usually go with the older master/slave cable.



Some computers have a fast channel (with an 80 wire cable) on just the first plug
with a slower channel (40 wire cable) on the second.
I remember having an IDE ZIP and CDRW drive that were finicky about where they were with certain motherboards.

There may also be some DMA settings in your motherboard BIOS.

I also found this.
http://www.motherboardpoint.com/t32431-slow-slave-hdd.html

rumpty
05-09-2006, 12:14 PM
Cyber_rigger, thanks for the suggestions. I'm using the traditional master/slave jumpers on the drives, which seem to be correct according to how the BIOS recognises them. I've never used the cable select options.

I'll probably end up with a fresh install of Linux when I find a drive position which doesn't interact with Windows, such as the slave position on the first cable. Linux won't boot from the slave position, as it was originally installed in the master position. Altering the drive references in the booting info sounds like hard work?

As you said, there is a fast cable on IDE1 socket only, but no reason why a fast cable couldn't be fitted to IDE2, I suppose. Will the CDROM reader/writer on the second cable slow down any IDE drive on this same cable?

Maybe I can get around any Windows/Linux conflicts with a nice new SATA drive for Linux. What do you reckon?

TGoddard
05-09-2006, 12:34 PM
If you install GRUB on the new master drive (boot a linux live CD and use grub-install) then you will be able to boot either of them. Linux is much less fussy about how data is physically stored.

P.S. This isn't a Windows/Linux conflict. It's a Windows/Hardware conflict :). Windows XP is known to be fussy about booting off a slave drive.

kjaada
05-09-2006, 01:59 PM
I have trouble understanding your problem."With the linux OS as yr slave then
windows acts normally".(as if it could) But what is wrong with that ?
I use linux (Xandros) on my slave and very rarely have to access windows for
anything but if I do it is not a problem.The only reason I ever boot in to windows
is to update the patches for windows and the AV updates etc just in case one day I may need to use it.

rumpty
05-09-2006, 02:35 PM
I have trouble understanding your problem."With the linux OS as yr slave then
windows acts normally".(as if it could) But what is wrong with that ?

Of course nothing is wrong with that. I should have put my last sentence into a new paragraph, to suggest it was referring to the whole item, or, specifically, having my master drive with linux on it, windows on the slave.

cyber_rigger
05-09-2006, 04:33 PM
As you said, there is a fast cable on IDE1 socket only, but no reason why a fast cable couldn't be fitted to IDE2,

You should get fast transfers assuming your motherboard does fast transfers on the second plug.



Maybe I can get around any Windows/Linux conflicts with a nice new SATA drive for Linux. What do you reckon?

Or ultra320 SCSI. You can have 16 disks per channel.
It does cost a little more. :^)

With Adaptec SCSI controllers you can usually set any of your SCSI drives to boot.
You just hit [ctrl]a at boot and change the SCSI BIOS.

One thing nice thing about SCSI is that you can do a low-level format and map around any bad sectors that may develop.

Graham L
05-09-2006, 04:46 PM
It is not a Windows-Linux conflict, as TGoddard said.

When you boot Linux, it runs. Windows does not exist on that machine except as a set of disk files. When you boot Windows, it runs and Linux does not exist except as a set of disk files. Disk files don't do anything. Executable disk files don't do anything until they are loaded into memory and a CPU executes the code.

If Windows is slow, look at the Windows installation. It's not Linus's fault. He didn't write any of Windows. ;)

drcspy
05-09-2006, 05:15 PM
also run a hdd diagnostic .....

rumpty
05-09-2006, 06:27 PM
also run a hdd diagnostic .....

A good idea, no doubt.

What I think it boils down to is that Windows is somehow confused by having a drive in the master position that is formatted in ext3 for Linux. If a drive formatted in FAT32 is substituted for the drive formatted in ext3, Windows runs normally.

cyber_rigger
05-09-2006, 08:41 PM
FWIW
I once had a computer where MS Windows would not recognize a non-Windows-formatted (ATA) hard drive,
i.e. Windows could not format the drive.

I forced the motherboard BIOS to use LBA access.
Windows could then see/use the drive.

You should be able to do an fdisk from Windows and see the Linux disk partion table as unknown partitions.

Graham L
06-09-2006, 02:08 PM
So it's a Windows deficiency. The simplest solution will be to let it use the primary master cable. Real operating systems don't mind having other formats around, so Linux will work wherever it's located. :D

cyber_rigger
10-09-2006, 03:19 PM
Try throwing MS Windows a bone, put a small useless Windows partition on the Linux drive.

This might give Windows something to gnaw on.