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View Full Version : Adsl filter's & Splitters



rmcb
03-09-2006, 01:49 PM
Can hard wire a adsl filter into my home wireing where it enters the house instead if using one on each jack point??. This is what isp's will do but they use a splitter which I can't seem to find for sale anywhere.

Graham L
03-09-2006, 02:01 PM
That's because a "splitter" is just a filter. :D

If you have a filter with two outputs, one marked "ADSL" and one "PHONE" you can just connect the rest of the house wiring to the "PHONE" one. If you have a filter with only one output, just do the same, but you connect your ADSL modem to the incoming line directly, on the input side of the filter. (The ADSL socket on the 2-output filter is just directly connected across the input of the filter, so it's really an "input").:thumbs:

cpg
03-09-2006, 02:33 PM
This what I wanted to do last year when I decided to get broadband. After much research I discovered the problem however is that the splitter is not readily available for purchase - Telecom have deliberately chosen NOT to "Telepermit" the splitter to discourage electrical suppliers and retailers from stocking it. One cheeky option is to approach the next Downers truck you see working on a Telecom cabinet in the street and try and convince the tech. to give you a splitter. In the end I paid for the full install as we had always had a line susceptible to rain so I got my money's-worth by having them sort that out at the same time, as well as running a new dedicated line for the ADSL to the PC (gives better speed than using filters). I also had him run the cable under the house rather than have a visible black cable running alond and down the eaves of a white-painted house.Make sure you get them to test the line speed while at your home because if it's hopeless you don't have to pay the install fee. It sure grates to have to pay $199 for something you can do yourself but can't because you can't buy the cheap tiny splitter.

Fredtan
03-09-2006, 10:34 PM
you can easily get these from those computer shops ad they are very chep compared to those sold by Telecoms, etc. Computer flea market in Paumure sells them otherwise get them to order one for you.

SurferJoe46
04-09-2006, 03:28 AM
you can easily get these from those computer shops ad they are very chep compared to those sold by Telecoms, etc. Computer flea market in Paumure sells them otherwise get them to order one for you.


There might be some confusion here as to what a splitter is verses filters.

I had Verizon install a splitter in Network Interface Connection(box) (called an NIC)...the plastic box on the outside of the home, where the service enters your system. Once that was done, I had to dedicate a seperate twisted pair to my DSL modem...which is the only connection.

Inside the house, I have no more filters to remove the high-frequency noise that DSL generates on the phone lines and into the phones.

I think the dual-install, although requiring a rewire of my home, was the best thing to do.

BTW: I rewired the home myself for the divided system.

Strommer
04-09-2006, 08:20 AM
Inside the house, I have no more filters to remove the high-frequency noise that DSL generates on the phone lines and into the phones.

I have always wondered about this - are filters necessary to prevent noise getting into the phones, or to stop phones from interfering from DSL operation, or both?

PaulD
04-09-2006, 09:20 AM
Both.
This is Telecom's reasoning taken from the Telepermit specs for filters
"Each filter will have two functions; to ensure that the POTS CPE connected
“behind” it does not interfere with the ADSL service, and to attenuate the ADSL
signals so that they will not interfere with the normal operation of that
equipment. For example, the POTS CPE could de-modulate the ADSL signals
to generate voiceband noise.
Telecom’s full-rate ADSL uses frequencies overlapping the AM broadcast radio
band and there is potential for spurious radiation from poorly balanced customer
wiring and CPE. This could result in unacceptable levels of radio frequency
interference (RFI). Unlike splitters located at the entry point, line filters
do not isolate all the existing premises wiring from the high frequency signals.
While it is expected that the use of line filters will not conflict with the RFI
suppression requirements in many installations, additional measures for limiting
radio frequency interference may be required in areas having low radio signal
levels or in any cases where customers often listen to distant AM broadcast radio
stations."