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Myth
28-08-2006, 02:05 PM
Right.. I have a bunch of old photos (given to me when my father died and also from when I was a kid) which my girlfriend sugested I should scan.
I remember hearing somewhere that I should scan them at 300dpi for best results. I tried a few on my scanner but on close inspection I notice a blemish on the scans, and on inspection of the scanner (couple of years old but seldom used) I notice the glass is slightly cloudy (moisture-like cloudiness) and that same blemish on the inside of the glass. So I'm thinking my scanner is screwed... oh well.

I know that some photo shops do scan photos for a cost (I believe the local shop uses Fuji scanning equipment). Would it be better to buy another scanner, or would I get better results getting the photo shop to do them (both are going to be approx the same price). If the photo shop does them, do I have the ability to say 'no' these are crap reproductions or any other form of recourse (I think thats the word Im after)? I am wanting to scan to disk from photo.

Anyone done, this; your experiences?

B.M.
28-08-2006, 02:30 PM
Has the scanner been on?

If not, I'd try leaving it on for a couple of days to see if the "mist" clears.

heaton
29-08-2006, 08:12 PM
Right.. I have a bunch of old photos (given to me when my father died and also from when I was a kid) which my girlfriend sugested I should scan.
I remember hearing somewhere that I should scan them at 300dpi for best results. I tried a few on my scanner but on close inspection I notice a blemish on the scans, and on inspection of the scanner (couple of years old but seldom used) I notice the glass is slightly cloudy (moisture-like cloudiness) and that same blemish on the inside of the glass. So I'm thinking my scanner is screwed... oh well.

I know that some photo shops do scan photos for a cost (I believe the local shop uses Fuji scanning equipment). Would it be better to buy another scanner, or would I get better results getting the photo shop to do them (both are going to be approx the same price). If the photo shop does them, do I have the ability to say 'no' these are crap reproductions or any other form of recourse (I think thats the word Im after)? I am wanting to scan to disk from photo.

Anyone done, this; your experiences?
Have you got a digital camera ? Much easier to photograph them with a digital camera and quicker once you have setup with natural light near a window.

quarry
29-08-2006, 11:23 PM
Have you got a digital camera ? Much easier to photograph them with a digital camera and quicker once you have setup with natural light near a window.

Doesn't work very well, unless you have copying equipment. Otherwise it's all crooked etc. Scanning is best & scanners are very cheap.

Thomas01
30-08-2006, 11:31 AM
Using a digital camera to photograph old photographs is a dead duck. Don't is probably the best advice - it needs loads of skill etc.
Scanners are cheap.
My old scanner had facilities to scan slides (excellent) and negatives lousy.
My new cheap HP scanner printer does better jobs of both scanning and printing than my old equipment but doesn't do slides (all mine are done anyway).
I have scanned over 2400 old photos and each one has a caption - thanks to ACDSee v3.5 (later editions are garbage and to be avoided).
It takes time - I am retired but so will you be some day and anyway its better than TV on a wet cold and windy night.
I like Adobe Photoshop Elements 2 for doing the work - and found shopping around camera shops I could buy it for considerably less than the normal price.
Tom

quarry
30-08-2006, 12:50 PM
Using a digital camera to photograph old photographs is a dead duck. Don't is probably the best advice - it needs loads of skill etc.
Scanners are cheap.
My old scanner had facilities to scan slides (excellent) and negatives lousy.
My new cheap HP scanner printer does better jobs of both scanning and printing than my old equipment but doesn't do slides (all mine are done anyway).
I have scanned over 2400 old photos and each one has a caption - thanks to ACDSee v3.5 (later editions are garbage and to be avoided).
It takes time - I am retired but so will you be some day and anyway its better than TV on a wet cold and windy night.
I like Adobe Photoshop Elements 2 for doing the work - and found shopping around camera shops I could buy it for considerably less than the normal price.
Tom


Agreed.
Lot's of people out there haven't got a clue what they're talking about.