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View Full Version : Where to find free Access database templates ?



hotkiwi
02-07-2006, 02:24 PM
friends,
my wife is an alternative health proivider and looking at a simple database to keep track of client personal data, including payments, when she sees her clients and a txt field what she discussed with tyhem at certain dates. i am sure this is such a straightforward template that there are freebiesout there that can be modified to do just that. Some easy report generating for the IRD would be great.
where on the web are these templates available?

cheers

johan

pctek
02-07-2006, 06:23 PM
You want a lot for nothing. Either you want Access or you want an Accounting package, don't think you'll get both in one.

Speedy Gonzales
02-07-2006, 06:29 PM
Look on the microsoft office site.

TGoddard
02-07-2006, 07:38 PM
Databases are usually best designed from scratch for a particular purpose. I recommend doing the following (you may need several pieces of paper to keep this neat):

1. Draw out on paper all the objects that you need to keep track of. This includes objects such as 'client', 'payment', 'appointment', or other objects you need to record.

2. Draw lines between connected objects and write a brief comment along each line saying what the relationship is. Work out whether your relationships should be one to one, one to many, or many to many.

3. Work out what information you need to store about each object and note it down.

4. Only now create a table for each of the objects in your system. I recommend simply using the name of the object for the table name (e.g. "clients"). At this point add only the information you want to store to the tables and a primary key (I'll assume you'll call this "id"). Make all primary keys an integer with "autoincrement" on.

5. Create your links. For each relationship in your diagram you need to:

One to one: Choose one table to hold the foreign key. Call this field something like "client_id" if it is a connection to a client object.

One to many: Do the same at this stage as the one to one. The object on the 'many' side must hold the foreign key field.

Many to many: Add an extra table, called something like "clients_appointments". Add two fields to this table called "client_id" and "appointment_id". You will then create a one to one link between this table and each of the two object tables.

All foreign keys should be integers as well, but should not have "autoincrement" on.

Once the fields have been set up, you can use the visual relationship editor to link all "client_id" fields to the "id" field in the client table and so on. You have a working set of relationships.

Beyond this I can't help you much as I don't own Access and have never seriously used it as I regard the mixing of data, relationship logic and the user interface as somewhat of a crime. Setting up the interface will have to be left to somebody with specific Access experience.

andrew93
02-07-2006, 10:05 PM
Have you looked at the standard templates that ship with Access?

hotkiwi
03-07-2006, 11:39 PM
Thanks for all of this and the time you took for me to write it down. i will work this out and then program something in Access. I just thought that many people must have prepared such a template before and that certainly on the web there was a resource for that. has nothing to do with 'wanting a lot for free' as suggested above.
Cheers
Johan



Databases are usually best designed from scratch for a particular purpose. I recommend doing the following (you may need several pieces of paper to keep this neat):

1. Draw out on paper all the objects that you need to keep track of. This includes objects such as 'client', 'payment', 'appointment', or other objects you need to record.

2. Draw lines between connected objects and write a brief comment along each line saying what the relationship is. Work out whether your relationships should be one to one, one to many, or many to many.

3. Work out what information you need to store about each object and note it down.

4. Only now create a table for each of the objects in your system. I recommend simply using the name of the object for the table name (e.g. "clients"). At this point add only the information you want to store to the tables and a primary key (I'll assume you'll call this "id"). Make all primary keys an integer with "autoincrement" on.

5. Create your links. For each relationship in your diagram you need to:

One to one: Choose one table to hold the foreign key. Call this field something like "client_id" if it is a connection to a client object.

One to many: Do the same at this stage as the one to one. The object on the 'many' side must hold the foreign key field.

Many to many: Add an extra table, called something like "clients_appointments". Add two fields to this table called "client_id" and "appointment_id". You will then create a one to one link between this table and each of the two object tables.

All foreign keys should be integers as well, but should not have "autoincrement" on.

Once the fields have been set up, you can use the visual relationship editor to link all "client_id" fields to the "id" field in the client table and so on. You have a working set of relationships.

Beyond this I can't help you much as I don't own Access and have never seriously used it as I regard the mixing of data, relationship logic and the user interface as somewhat of a crime. Setting up the interface will have to be left to somebody with specific Access experience.

netchicken
04-07-2006, 09:39 AM
Hot kiwi, you have a good point. I have a collection of databases that people have made exactly for that, so that there is a template to use. However in reality each database is so unique that it is better to make them from scratch. All I have ever got from the ones I have are ideas for making databases, and being able to pull them to bits to see how things work. If you want I will see if I can put them on the net. Unfortunatly their files sizes are pretty big.

Don"t Access have wizard tools for making simple databases like you need?