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Erger
25-03-2006, 06:36 PM
Hi,
my son is off to Japan and we have bought a Step-up Transformer (the IBM R31 appears to need 220v) but note that it has a limit of 50 watts. From a bit of reading it seems that the laptop would draw more than this and that we would need a 100w transformer.

If anyone can help with advice then it would be much appreciated.

tks George

somebody
25-03-2006, 06:53 PM
Hi Erger, and welcome to PressF1.

Quite a lot of notebook transformers nowadays are multi-voltage capable. I'd strongly recommend that you double-check the back of the adaptor, to see if it can accept 100-240v input.

Erger
25-03-2006, 07:15 PM
Hi Erger, and welcome to PressF1.

Quite a lot of notebook transformers nowadays are multi-voltage capable. I'd strongly recommend that you double-check the back of the adaptor, to see if it can accept 100-240v input.

Hi, doh yes just checked that and you are right. He still needs to take a transformer for a couple of items (toothbrush and DS) that do need the step up so I guess we can just buy a plug adaptor for laptop ... still not sure whether he could just plug into the transformer which could 'double' as a plug adaptor.

George

somebody
25-03-2006, 11:06 PM
If he's staying in a hotel, quite often they have those "Shavers Only" sockets in the wall - which provide both 110v and 240v. It would be worth checking first before he leaves, because it could save the investment.

Nomad
26-03-2006, 11:17 AM
I bought a digital SLR camera from Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan and it works fine here. The power pack on mine says 100-240V or 120-240V sort of .... All I needed is a shape converter found in electronic stores. Or use a pair of pliers.

I have used IBM Thinkpads since 1999 and it has dual voltage. I bought my first one in the USA via eBay 2nd hand and it worked here. I see no reason why a R series Thinkpad (modern model) is not dual voltage.

To my knowledge you can just shove the laptop into a 240V or 120V outlet. You could get off the plane and sit on the floor and plug in your laptop.

If it is single voltage, it surprises me, check the black box of the adaptor unit. Its prob less hassle if you just bought another IBM Thinkpad AC Charger unit. Its more compact and stuff for travel.

Erger
26-03-2006, 12:08 PM
The IBM AC adaptor is dual voltage so that we agree is not an issue. He is going for 9 months and is staying in a school dorm so there are a couple of other electrical appliances making the journey as well. 2 are dual voltage and 2 are not. Ideally we were just going to use a step-up transformer that would do them all and overcomes the problem of the Japanese 2 pin socket and our 3 pin plugs.

Trouble is the transformer I have initially purchased is only rated to 50 watts and on the back of the IBM adaptor it says the output is 16v - 4.5a, which I 'think' means it is drawing at least 60 - 70 watts and so to much. Hence my question if anyone knows what sort of current a laptop would draw.

tks George

somebody
26-03-2006, 01:35 PM
Regardless, since the laptop's transformer is dual-voltage, it would be much cheaper just buying a "travel adaptor" for Japan - usually about $5, which will turn our 3-pin plugs into Japan's 2-pin system. That way you won't have to worry about the current being drawn by the laptop.

Graham L
26-03-2006, 02:16 PM
Get a plug adapter. That is just a straight through connector. Shop around a bit -- some places charge ridiculous prices.

DO NOT be tempted to use the transformer as a plug adapter. All the power used goes through the transformer, and heats the transformer (because it is not 100% efficient). All the transformers like this I have seen have had internal thermal fuses. If it overheats once, it's dead. :(

You would (probably) get away with it for a while ... the laptop adapter usually provides much less than the nameplate ratings. But the first time it was used with a flat laptop battery, the power pulled would double because it would be charging the battery as well as powering the laptop. End of 50W transformer.