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dcsp
28-02-2006, 04:54 PM
I copy, rename and re-use an Excel spread-sheet on an annual basis. However, it seems to have a link to an old, long since cancelled, file. I cannot find the (or any) cell which requires this link in order to erase it.

Can anyone tell me how to find where this link originates - I know I can cancel the requirement after it comes up, but the whole process is annoying?

Thanks

dcsp

godfather
28-02-2006, 05:04 PM
In Excel - Edit - Links

You will get the option to break the link there.

FoxyMX
28-02-2006, 05:28 PM
There is a utility called dellinks.exe that breaks old links in Excel. You can get it from one of these pages (http://www.google.com/search?client=opera&rls=en&q=excel+dellinks.exe&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8).

godfather
28-02-2006, 06:05 PM
But its much easier to use the edit link facility in Excel, Foxy.

You also get to see what document its linked to as a bonus.

Graham L
28-02-2006, 06:10 PM
Features, features, features. That one seems to be not too well hidden, but ... ;)

I believe that most of the features which people ask to be added to the MS Office are already there. It's just that there are so many features that people can't find them. :cool:

FoxyMX
28-02-2006, 08:03 PM
But its much easier to use the edit link facility in Excel, Foxy.

You also get to see what document its linked to as a bonus.
Yes, definitely - if the link is actually visible in the worksheet.

I once had a spreadsheet that, for a very long time, I wasn't able to break the link to another, deleted, spreadsheet but it kept on wanting to update itself. In the end the only way I was able to break the link and fix it was with the app referred to in my previous post.

Mike
28-02-2006, 08:14 PM
I believe that most of the features which people ask to be added to the MS Office are already there. It's just that there are so many features that people can't find them. :cool:The feature I want isn't there :) I've looked many times... many many many times... all I've ever asked is to be able to have more than 65536 rows in Excel... it seems so simple, but it's never been done :(

Mike.

godfather
28-02-2006, 08:48 PM
Yes, definitely - if the link is actually visible in the worksheet.

I once had a spreadsheet that, for a very long time, I wasn't able to break the link to another, deleted, spreadsheet but it kept on wanting to update itself. In the end the only way I was able to break the link and fix it was with the app referred to in my previous post.
That has to be a corruption in the spreadsheet though, as if there is no editable link then there is no actual link.

Parry
01-03-2006, 07:11 AM
The feature I want isn't there :) I've looked many times... many many many times... all I've ever asked is to be able to have more than 65536 rows in Excel... it seems so simple, but it's never been done :(

Mike.

Hi Mike, I believe the 655536 row limit will be increased when MS release a 64-bit version of Excel. My understanding is the row limit will be >1,000,000.

Mike
01-03-2006, 07:50 AM
Hi Mike, I believe the 655536 row limit will be increased when MS release a 64-bit version of Excel. My understanding is the row limit will be >1,000,000.That would be terrific! I usually need around the 300,000 mark, so that would work just find for me ;)

I suppose that would require a 64bit processor and a 64 bit OS? Hmmm... That might swing me toward a certain CPU brand for my new PC ;)

Mike.

Parry
01-03-2006, 08:33 AM
Heres some info here on Excels new specs...

http://blogs.msdn.com/excel/archive/2005/09/26/474258.aspx

Increasing # columns from 256 to 16,384, #rows from 65,536 to 1,048,576 and #cells from 16,777,216 to 17,179,869,184.

What Im happy about is the # conditional formats will go from 3 (pathetic) to limitation by available memory (presumably 100's if not 1,000's). Previously you had to write code to manage >3 c/f.

Its also good to see sorting increased from 3 to 64 although I could always use a dummy column to concatenate the values I wanted but this would be easier.

Excel is not exactly fast in my opinion as it is. No doubt the new version could be a potential resource hog.

kingdragonfly
01-03-2006, 10:14 AM
You know Excel is a spreadsheet, not a database.

I've seen many businesses, including government agencies and hospitals, running critical processes with Excel spreadsheets. While Excel is easy, it's not robust.

Ask yourself this: "if I lost my spreadsheets, how much will it cost my business, in lost time and money?" If it's significant, maybe it's time to hire a programmer / consultant.

Parry
01-03-2006, 10:23 AM
You know Excel is a spreadsheet, not a database.

I've seen many businesses, including government agencies and hospitals, running critical processes with Excel spreadsheets. While Excel is easy, it's not robust.

Ask yourself this: "if I lost my spreadsheets, how much will it cost my business, in lost time and money?" If it's significant, maybe it's time to hire a programmer / consultant.

Indeed true, but whos saying its a database?

kingdragonfly
01-03-2006, 10:28 AM
It's an easy trap to fall into. Someone creates a handy spreadsheet. It gets placed on a shared folder. Lots of people starting using it. Before long, it's business critical.

I'm not saying Excel doesn't have it's place, but once you start getting thousand of rows, or hundreds of columns, maybe it's changed from a spreadsheet to a database.

Mike
01-03-2006, 10:29 AM
You know Excel is a spreadsheet, not a database.

I've seen many businesses, including government agencies and hospitals, running critical processes with Excel spreadsheets. While Excel is easy, it's not robust.

Ask yourself this: "if I lost my spreadsheets, how much will it cost my business, in lost time and money?" If it's significant, maybe it's time to hire a programmer / consultant.I don't use Excel to storethe data - it is used for manipulating the data for reports, calculations, data checking etc. which databases just don't allow for easily. Most my data is already stored in SQL, and a lot of the data that is not stored in SQL is pumped into Excel to manipulate before it is loaded into one of the SQL databases.

Plus when it's all my data, it is far quicker and easier for me to do all the work in Excel than having to try and explain it to one of our database specialists to do in SQL for me.

Mike.