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View Full Version : Seek advice.. Battery Operated Insect Repellents



Myth
03-02-2006, 08:46 PM
With this warm weather in our area recently, we are having to keep our windows open to get rid of the heat at night, and also so our [almost 2] daughter will sleep through the night. However, the mozzies are attacking her to the point she now has something like 20+ mozzie bites all over her body (incidentally anyone know any old remedies for itchy bites, she hates calamine, and vinegar)
Here is our situation.. we can't afford to run a fan all night and keep the windows closed (electricity bill too high). We can't shut the windows (kid keeps waking up coz its hot).
We are looking at getting a battery operated insect repellent and have seen 2 at Mitre 10 that we can afford.

I want to know, anyone used either the Expra Insect Eliminator Dispenser or the Robocan?
Are either noisy, are they any good?

Looking at a system that costs under $100 (unfortunately the money I was saving for my Zalman CPU cooler is financing this, but my kid is more important)

Billy T
03-02-2006, 08:53 PM
Power for the fan will be cheaper, and it's your daughter's health that is at stake. Either that, or tape some netting over the window.

As for the calamine, at 2 she's too young to hate it for any reason other than the application, so bite the bullet and put it on, she'll forget it within 5 minutes. Kids complain but parents rule. There are better creams for that too, but they also cost more than the power.

You could also treat all the areas around your house that mosquitos breed. Fly spray knocks them back. Look around sunset and you will see them swarming. Don't forget the guttering for your roof either.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

beetle
03-02-2006, 09:07 PM
We have a robocan, we find it really good and does not effect the child who suffers asthma. this goes all the time - they are set to spray every 7 minutes, you dont notice it usually, place it up high so they cant reach.

Have you tried a liquid antihistimine? You can get childrens formula.

i would suggest nets as well, but if a robocan is in the house, it will work, make sure you get the killer one, not the deterant, as it works much better.

is the child in a cot or bed? you can drape a net over the cot, i have done this before,


beetle

Myth
03-02-2006, 09:16 PM
Ok, kid is in a bed (she stopped sleeping in the cot months ago).
We were looking at the idea of buying some cheap net curtain, and pinning it at each corner to keep the mozzies out... the problem with that is that one of the 2 windows is right above her bed and she has turned into a monkey sometime in the first 15 months of her life.

Liquid antihistimine (I am assuming from the chemist?).. never heard of it.

We are going into NP tomorrow, will look at either fans or Robocan then.

Billy, the parents do rule, she does get calamine put on. But Im thinking prevention is better than the cure

John H
03-02-2006, 09:56 PM
I have never tried one of those battery things, but I do have a bit of an aversion to regularly pumping chemicals into the air in a confined space, especially in a child's room. However, that is an uninformed opinion as far as these things go.

If you hop onto TradeMe and do a search for 'mosquito net', you will find quite a few for sale - one of them I noticed has a buy now price of $20. You can get the plain netting or impregnated variety. There is even a lilac coloured one!

Maybe you can persuade your Monster that it is a great treat because she is sleeping in a tent...

Laura
03-02-2006, 09:57 PM
When I was in Queensland years ago, they lit coils of something whose name escapes me at the moment, but I have seen them here in hardware shops.

Mind you, they may be meant for outdoor use, though I recall having one in my bedroom.

Does anyone have any experience with them - good or bad?

I do remember hearing someone from Consumer rubbishing the simple cheap devices you merely plug into a power point, as their tests found them basically useless.

John H
03-02-2006, 10:00 PM
I think they are usually referred to as mosquito coils, and I suspect they are based on citronella. You can get them here. My son and daughter in law use them on the Wet Coast if they are having a barbecue outside. Not sure if they use them in the house.

EX-WESTY
03-02-2006, 10:15 PM
I have the expira unit which is about $45 from Mitre 10 and guess what they have 25% of anything under $50 this weekend with the coupon sheet or voucher from the papers in the morning. The refill cans are $9-12, Mitre 10 mega being cheaper. I also managed to pick up about 6-7 refill tins in the supermarket dent bin a couple of months back for $3 each.

A can lasts about 6 weeks on a spray every 15 mins for here.

The robocan refills are about $20 each for the same volume

zqwerty
03-02-2006, 10:59 PM
Get a mosquito net to cover the bed by hanging it from the ceiling and Savlon Cream from the Supermarket or Chemist will take away the sting.

FoxyMX
04-02-2006, 12:40 PM
I agree with the suggestions regarding using a mosquito net instead of chemical repellants. Much healthier and it should be fun for your daughter as well, sleeping in a "tent". :p

Regarding the itchy bites, get some Soov gel (made by Ego) from the pharmacy. It's absolutely wonderful as it provides instant relief from itchiness and has an antiseptic ingredient to help heal the bites. It's way better than calamine lotion. :thumbs:

somebody
04-02-2006, 03:35 PM
Have you tried those insect zappers? They're the ones with a UV light in between an electrified mesh, which attracts bugs then zaps them. I haven't personally used one, but someone else might have.

Sweep
04-02-2006, 04:35 PM
We use Expra.Works here on flies.
I have no idea if it is effective on mossies as we don't seem to have any here outside even.

Chilling_Silence
15-12-2007, 06:00 PM
So, I loathe dragging up old threads, or seeing them dragged up, but this one was of particular interest to me this evening.

My father and I were having a debate about our Expra Insect Eliminator, subject came up because he wasnt sure if it was working.

Anyways, in a nutshell, he bet me $10 that it was simply an automated fly-spray. I was certain it was a fly-deterrent more than a killer. If I were wrong, I would have to buy the family an Ice Cream on this lovely spring evening.

So, I Google (And Wikipedia) naturally, and the first thread that comes up is this one from PCWorld.

It says in post-1 that its a repellant.
Then the 2nd Google result was:
http://www.mitre10.co.nz/shop/gardening_supplies/plant_health_and_pest_control/expra_insect_eliminator_dispenser_139434.cfm

Also says its a repellant
So I search the Mitre 10 website for Robocan, also a repellant.

So, just to clarify, these things arent specifically designed to kill the flies, just repel them, correct?

R2x1
15-12-2007, 06:47 PM
The best thing for your problem is not to use over priced, messy and possibly dangerous "Battery Operated Insect Repellents". It is simpler, safer and cheaper to take the batteries out of the insects.

beetle
15-12-2007, 06:54 PM
Flyswats are cheaper.................:lol:
But then rolled up newspapers work well too.......:p

beetle:lol:

R2x1
15-12-2007, 07:02 PM
Have you tried those insect zappers? They're the ones with a UV light in between an electrified mesh, which attracts bugs then zaps them. I haven't personally used one, but someone else might have.
I have one, not only does it work; it makes a satisfying zap as the bug gets it's own personal lightning bolt. Fat blowflies make a very juicy crack, moths just make a bit of a buzzing noise, but they often glow for a couple of seconds.
It is a bit sad on the odd praying mantis, they get blown in two. Their "wasp waists" must be a fuse.
Mini bugs are too small to bridge the gap, so they fly up and down the blue tubes until they are tuckered out. If you have hit the bottom tray with a squirt from a long term flyspray, they land exhausted with their wee tongues hanging out, get glued down and poisoned in short order.

If they don't like it, they should have been born with less legs.

kenj
15-12-2007, 07:39 PM
Lots of whisky makes mosquitos sick when strained through a human.

Ken :2cents: :2cents:

PaulD
15-12-2007, 07:43 PM
So, just to clarify, these things arent specifically designed to kill the flies, just repel them, correct?

It's an automated fly spray, if the fly isn't smart enough to be repelled it will die.
If flies were clever enough to detect Pyrethrins and clear off why do they fly through the middle of a room that's just been sprayed?

As far as the zapping devices go, they kill plenty of insects but not the mosquitoes that do the biting.

Mercury
15-12-2007, 09:05 PM
Best way of getting rid of mozzies is to do a thorough search of the garden for stale water - old flower pots, watering cans, hollow logs etc - and empty them. If there is an area that can't be emptied - like the unused drain outside our bedroom - pour in half a cup of used cooking oil to seal the surface. They rear their young in water.

R2x1
15-12-2007, 09:17 PM
If flies were clever enough to detect Pyrethrins and clear off why do they fly through the middle of a room that's just been sprayed?
There's a few headaches with flying through the room's edges. :yuck:

To avoid mossie bites (Mite bites) have a tempting, tender and tasty missus.

bob_doe_nz
15-12-2007, 09:19 PM
So, just to clarify, these things arent specifically designed to kill the flies, just repel them, correct?

If you have a robocan or equivalent, spray a burst of it at say, a spider. Tell me if it dies or not

Chilling_Silence
16-12-2007, 12:26 AM
10 minutes later the spiders still alive, I think I'll let it go now...

Apparently some people dont notice the post-dates before replying ;)

Myth
16-12-2007, 05:58 AM
...

Apparently some people dont notice the post-dates before replying ;)True.

Ended up buying the Innovair Robocan from Mitre 10. We ran out of spray the other day and haven't bothered to replce it till yesterday. Man, the amount of flies that came inside :dogeye:
Replaced it yesterday (trying out the 'commercial strength).. no flies at all. Great deterrent :thumbs:

Trev
16-12-2007, 07:39 AM
Had a robo can for 3 years, wouldn't do without. Have it a top of a six foot tall book case. The spray spreads through out the house Killing every living insect. Quite often find half dead cockroaches. Good at killing white tailed spiders.
:)

Roscoe
16-12-2007, 11:36 AM
We have been using Eco-Mist for some years and highly recommend the system.

A good example of its effectiveness: Our can ran out two days ago and the ants and flies were back with a vengeance. Once a new can was installed they all disappeared as if by magic.

The spray uses pyrethrin which is what some plants use to ward off predators so if nature uses it, it can't be too bad.

I take exception to people talking about pumping chemicals into the air. That emotionally charged talk achieves nothing.

Of course it is a chemical. Everything on this earth is made of a chemical or combination of chemicals. (Remember your chemistry at school?) There are nasty man-made chemicals just as there are nasty nature made chemicals. You just need to sort out the good from the bad.

Besides, you are not "pumping." As has been said it puts out a small puff about every seven seconds.

I would not suggest that you put it in the child's room because it does not need to be. The spray disperses throughout the house so if it was in the hall, for example, and the child's door was open, it would treat the bedroom and the rest of the house.

As has been said, it would be an idea to treat the areas where they breed. They like still, sometimes stagnant, water. If you can't get rid of the water, pour some kerosene over the water - they can't penetrate that.

Don't worry about asthma sufferers. We have three in our house and it does not affect them at all.

Automatic spray cans are great. A terrific idea and very effective.

Cicero
16-12-2007, 11:45 AM
I find bathing at least once a week keeps the flys away.:rolleyes:

johcar
16-12-2007, 12:41 PM
I find bathing at least once a week keeps the flys away.:rolleyes:Once a week, whether you need it or not????

R2x1
16-12-2007, 12:46 PM
EVERY week ? ? ?

Cicero
16-12-2007, 12:57 PM
Once a week, whether you need it or not????

If not needed,say 2 weeks,this would be winter,one at mo.

BobM
16-12-2007, 08:57 PM
Briscoes were selling a netting type cover which was suspended from the ceiling. It covered from the bed head to about half way down the bed .Very light mesh, pinkish material. Worth while checking them out.

joemac
16-12-2007, 09:17 PM
Growing up in Zim, we had mossie coils burning in the house (and mossie nets and Quinine). They were terrible, stay away from them if you ever see them. They work, in that they keep the bugs away but that may have been just because we were up all night coughing them away

SurferJoe46
18-12-2007, 07:57 AM
With this warm weather in our area recently, we are having to keep our windows open to get rid of the heat at night, and also so our [almost 2] daughter will sleep through the night. However, the mozzies are attacking her to the point she now has something like 20+ mozzie bites all over her body (incidentally anyone know any old remedies for itchy bites, she hates calamine, and vinegar)


We use Benadryl®


(Despite being one of the oldest antihistamines on the market, it is largely the most effective antihistamine available either by prescription or over-the-counter, and has been shown to exceed the effectiveness of even the latest prescription drugs. Consequently, it is frequently used when an allergic reaction requires fast, effective reversal of the often dangerous effects of a massive histamine release. Diphenhydramine works by blocking the effect of histamine at H1 receptor sites. This results in effects such as the reduction of smooth muscle contraction, making diphenhydramine a popular choice for treatment of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis, hives, motion sickness, and insect bites and stings.)

We use it directly on the bites and it removes the itch and the swelling almost immediately. It can also be taken by mouth for longer term effect as a prophylactic treatment.

It's a very good idea to keep a bottle (liquid version) in the medicine chest for allergic reactions of any kind. Anaphylaxis kills.... (http://www.medicinenet.com/anaphylaxis/article.htm)...especially small children or the elderly and the sick.

Other "off primary usage" things like Adolph's Meat Tenderizer or any meat tenderizer with papaya in it also removes the discomfort but does not treat as a prophylaxis but rather as a respondent device.

I've heard that ammonia directly applied to the bites also works. I know it does for jellyfish stings (hence the moniker: SurferJoe) as I have had it sprayed on me by the lifeguards at Huntington Beach in the past life. Just not too sure of the insect bites responding to it though. It's cheap and would not be a bad thing to try..as it isn't really dangerous unless it is snorted or shot up.

R2x1
18-12-2007, 08:20 PM
Snorting ammonia? ? Wow. That would be fun (to watch). :horrified :yuck:

Ever tried crushed dock leaves as an antihistamine? It works rather well, and I haven't heard of any bad reactions. (Except to the docks.)

qazwsxokmijn
18-12-2007, 09:05 PM
Look at an Asian shop and ask for 'Kwan Loong' oil. It's meant to be for bruises and pains, but the oil also reduces itchiness as well. Doesn't smell bad, I actually like the smell - kinda minty.

Trev
18-12-2007, 09:32 PM
Don't know if this is what you want. Had a work Christmas do today and everyone bought secret presents. I got a Mosquito and Bugg Zapper. It is in the shape of a small tennis racket and has wire mesh either side of it. It is powered by to AA batteries. To operate you hold in a little button when you are trying to kill insects and when they come in contact with the mesh it fries them. As I have a Robo can in my house I have been unable to try it, but I know it gives a bit of a kick, as I accidently touched both sides of the mesh while I had the button pushed in. ouch!!
:)

robbyp
18-12-2007, 10:19 PM
We use this one http://www.ecomist.com.au/ in part of our house where we have ants. Ants are really bad in the Hutt valley, and they even eat the carpet. It certainly keeps the ants away, and we know when it needs a new refill as the ants then come back. It is supposed to be natural, but I wouldn't put it in my bedroom.

BobM
19-12-2007, 10:51 PM
Cut the thick stem out of a dock leaf and roll the leaf up as tight as you can. Cut to length of cigarette & roll in a cigarette paper. About three puffs will make you forget all about the bugs & bites. ! ! !