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View Full Version : What rechargeable batteries for a mouse?



alisam
11-11-2005, 06:35 AM
I have a Logitech cordless optical mouse which seems to go through 2 x AA Batteries too frequently. I tend to use Eveready Super Heavy Duty.

I am thinking of using rechargeable batteries but I have not come across information which recommends what mAh to use.

Typical batteries sold today seem to be 1700, 1800, 2000 mAh.

Dick Smith (Westgate) has an opening special for DSE 1 Hour Charger for $39.98 and comes with 4 x AA 2000mAh. Will these batteries be OK for a mouse?

TeejayR
11-11-2005, 06:49 AM
I would have thought they would have been foine for the mouse as the batteries are essentially onle drivibg electronics and a small light - not something as power hungry as a cassette or CD motor. I thisnk the top standard for NiMH was only about 1600mAh a couple of years ago.

Just be aware that NiMH batteries lose their charge over a period of time - something like 1% a day I think I read once so if you only used 2 at a time and went to use the other 2 in 3 months or so they could be running near to flat.

Mind you at that price (usually $79.95) I'm sure you would have another use for the 2 batteries not used and a full charge is only an hour away.

Strommer
11-11-2005, 06:59 AM
Dick Smith (Westgate) has an opening special for DSE 1 Hour Charger for $39.98 and comes with 4 x AA 2000mAh. Will these batteries be OK for a mouse?

Yes, these would be fine, and the price seems OK. You can pay up to $80 for a similar set of batteries and charger, or down to $30 but thats for an overnight charger.

Any rechargeable would be OK, whether a 1600 mAh or 2400. The higher rating just means it will last longer. I have some 4 yr old 1600 AA's that I still use in my digcam, as well as newer 2400 ones (but never mix them, keep same capacities together).

heni72847
11-11-2005, 07:42 AM
i use 2000mAh for the two rechargable AA batteries in my wireless optical mouse
the rating on the mouse is 3V and 100mA
i notice how this mouse uses way more power compared the the non optical one i had before and have to change battery more frequently
2000mAh seems to give a decent lenghth of usage time but i wouldn't go under 2000 though

godfather
11-11-2005, 08:42 AM
I tend to use Eveready Super Heavy Duty.

Thats one of the problems. you should only use Alkaline cells if not using rechargeables. The energy storage capacity of a "super heavy duty" cell is probably about 1/4 of an alkaline one.

The DSE NiMh batteries were recently tested by PC User magazine and were the best of them all.

Billy T
11-11-2005, 09:12 AM
The DSE NiMh batteries were recently tested by PC User magazine and were the best of them all.

DSE's house brand of AA batteries are great value too. I buy the 40 packs on special and usually pay around 50 cents per cell. Normal price is 75 cents per cell. You can pay up to $4.50 per cell in retail shops, Mitre 10 is worst at $18+ for 4 cells.

I find the DSE battery life as good as any I have used, and at those prices I simply can't be bothered with rechargeables.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

John H
11-11-2005, 09:20 AM
DSE's house brand of AA batteries are great value too. I buy the 40 packs on special and usually pay around 50 cents per cell. Normal price is 75 cents per cell. You can pay up to $4.50 per cell in retail shops, Mitre 10 is worst at $18+ for 4 cells.

I find the DSE battery life as good as any I have used, and at those prices I simply can't be bothered with rechargeables.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)
Whilst I think you are correct Billy (I have had a similar experience with one of those DES 40 packs), I cannot stand the waste involved in using 'one use' batteries. Chucking all those batteries away when they are flat really gets to me. When you have a digi camera that takes four batteries, two wireless optical mice and two wireless keyboards, and umpteen TV/VCR/DVD player remotes, this family gets through heaps of batteries each year. I feel more comfortable doing the rechargeable thing rather than binning all those toxic waste batteries.

Speedy Gonzales
11-11-2005, 04:56 PM
Or get one of these.

http://www.edencomputers.co.nz/p.aspx?316493

It doesn't use batteries.

Greven
11-11-2005, 05:11 PM
How does the mouse power itself without using batteries or being powered through the USB cable?

Is this one of those wireless mice that require a special mouse pad so you don't really get all the advantages of a wireless mouse?

Thomas01
11-11-2005, 08:08 PM
Seems to me the best solution is to run a power cord from the computer to the mouse. You wouldn't always be looking for the darn thing then either.
Err has that already been done? - could catch on.
Tom

alisam
14-11-2005, 08:12 PM
Thank you for all your replies. I bought the DSE Rechargeable batteries.

Now I have to recharge and discharge 3 times before I use them. Seems daft but if that is what the instructions say.

somebody
14-11-2005, 08:45 PM
How does the mouse power itself without using batteries or being powered through the USB cable?

Is this one of those wireless mice that require a special mouse pad so you don't really get all the advantages of a wireless mouse?

Yes, you need a special mouse pad, though apparently you can stick the mouse pad UNDER your desk (as long as your desk isn't too thick), and it will still work.

godfather
14-11-2005, 09:09 PM
Thank you for all your replies. I bought the DSE Rechargeable batteries.

Now I have to recharge and discharge 3 times before I use them. Seems daft but if that is what the instructions say.

Charging them and using them in the mouse until they are flat is using them.
What they mean is that its not a good idea to charge them and leave them unused .... until at least 3 cycles.

Cicero
15-11-2005, 06:51 AM
Iii bet alisam is kicking himself for not noticing that small detail ;)