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Myth
11-07-2005, 07:05 PM
I have all these P3-Celeron era parts, so I am looking at building a Linux based file server. It may also be used as a firewall (experimental purposes, may even be long term).
It will have 128MB RAM with Celeron CPU, sitting on a nondescript mobo.
I am looking for advice on a non-labour intensive Linux distro for the above.
The primary harddrive is an 8GB Seagate, there will also be an 80GB slave Samsung storing files.
Any ideas?

Also advice is wanted as to how I should partition the 80GB drive. It will be used to store both Linux and Windows files (mainly zipped)
Should I have one partition as Windows and one as Linux, or just one big partition formatted as FAT32 storing 2 folders (Windows, Linux)

robsonde
11-07-2005, 07:08 PM
I run OpenBSD unix on a much smaller system and i am very happy.

vinref
12-07-2005, 01:12 AM
I have all these P3-Celeron era parts, so I am looking at building a Linux based file server. It may also be used as a firewall (experimental purposes, may even be long term).
It will have 128MB RAM with Celeron CPU, sitting on a nondescript mobo.
I am looking for advice on a non-labour intensive Linux distro for the above.
The primary harddrive is an 8GB Seagate, there will also be an 80GB slave Samsung storing files.
Any ideas?

Have a look at this list (http://www.frozentech.com/content/livecd.php) of liveCDs. Some are listed as "servers". Look around their home sites for more info.


Also advice is wanted as to how I should partition the 80GB drive. It will be used to store both Linux and Windows files (mainly zipped)
Should I have one partition as Windows and one as Linux, or just one big partition formatted as FAT32 storing 2 folders (Windows, Linux)

If you need file storage that is accessible by both Windows and Linux machines, then you have three choices:
one Windows and one Linux partition;
one Windows and no Linux partitions;
or one Linux partition and no Windows partition but you must run Samba.

Since you look like you want to run a linux server, then I recommend the last option and dedicate the whole box to linux.

Graham L
12-07-2005, 01:58 PM
Live CDs are great. On a fast machine, to play with.

For a server, a live CD will be no easier to set up than a proper installed OS. It will just have the severe pewrformance hit. Permanently. It has the minor advantage that the OS files are virus proof. But you can have a good firewall for that.

I'd make at least two, probably four, partitions out of the big disk. That will make keeping the Windows and "real OS" files separate marginally easier. ;) In real terms, in case of accidents, it's easier to restore (and make backups for) smaller chunks.

For an OS, try to be at least one release back from "the latest" of a well-known distribution. :) The bugs will be known. You don't know what is hidden in the latest release.

My servers have all been built with Red Hat. Except one (on a 486DX33) which has still got a 2.0.9 kernel. That was installed from the tape drive it looks after.

I think I'd use Mandrake 10.

Remember that you don't need GUIs, Open Office, and all the user-fiendly "applications" being pushed into distributions to make them "like Windows". I wish people would realise exactly what that means. :groan:


A server doesn't even need a monitor or keyboard after it's set up. It's better without such things.

Chilling_Silence
12-07-2005, 02:52 PM
Id be inclined to suggest Fedora if you've never used Linux before.

Otherwise if you're feeling confidant try Slackware...

Ive installed Gentoo on a P60Mhz w/48MB Ram + a 1.2GB HDD (Admittedly /usr/portage was an nfs mount).

Go Fedora, give it a whirl :)

Myth
12-07-2005, 03:31 PM
Id be inclined to suggest Fedora if you've never used Linux before.

Otherwise if you're feeling confidant try Slackware... Have been using Fedora 4 since a couple of days since it came out as main O/S. Used FC3 as guinea pig before that (ironing out issues, seeing how I liked Linux). Admittedly Im not a confident Linux user though (I still managed to destroy KDE in Fedora last week :))

I think I'd use Mandrake 10.

Remember that you don't need GUIs, Open Office, and all the user-fiendly "applications" being pushed into distributions to make them "like Windows". I wish people would realise exactly what that means. :(


A server doesn't even need a monitor or keyboard after it's set up. It's better without such things. I was wondering about using Mandrake 10.1, or pref Fedora Core 3
I was going to make it a minimal install, with just necessary server tools.

I will need to set up Samba on it (correct??) so the Windows machine can access needed files

Otherwise, with the course I have almost completed and the practise I get at home, networking will be a breeze :D

Is there any way (without connecting to a monitor or keyboard, I can access the server from my Linux machine, and shut it down, or just check on it if needed (I think this is known as remote access)?

Jen
12-07-2005, 05:09 PM
Is there any way (without connecting to a monitor or keyboard, I can access the server from my Linux machine, and shut it down, or just check on it if needed (I think this is known as remote access)?With servers you do not need GUI's (KDE/Gnome etc) so will just use command line only. You can easily access your server using ssh from your Linux box. You will need to hook up a monitor/keyboard/mouse to install the system, but once it is running they can be removed. Remember to set your BIOS not to halt on keyboard errors otherwise it will not boot if no keyboard is present. Using ssh you can shut the server down remotely with the shutdown command. For Windows to access the box you will need samba setup.

If you are not familiar with ssh, then enter in man ssh in a terminal console. :)

vinref
12-07-2005, 05:49 PM
Do Fedora and Mandrake still offer a "server" configuration during installation?

Chilling_Silence
12-07-2005, 10:06 PM
You can also run VNC Servers, or setup KDE to auto-share Display :0 via VNC.

Personally, I only run ssh on my server. Samba yes, you'll need that too. Have a play with VideoLAN Client while you're at it, its a cool tool/toy :)

Myth
12-07-2005, 10:36 PM
Looks like I will be playing with ssh this weekend :)
Just waiting for 2 RAM modules to arrive and then the machine is complete (and with a CPU replacement today and borrowed RAM .. running :))
I have too much old stuff lol
Anyone throwing out a P4 setup? :p (Mobo and CPU must go plz :) pref around the $free mark :D)

Chilling_Silence
12-07-2005, 10:49 PM
SSH is cool because you can use the:
ssh -l mythix 192.168.0.2 -X

the -X command enabled X11 forwarding... Really cool!!

Myth
12-07-2005, 10:52 PM
SSH is cool because you can use the:
ssh -l mythix 192.168.0.2 -X

the -X command enabled X11 forwarding... Really cool!!Hmm X11 ... I remember reading about that earlier this year (thankfully it never came up in my A+ exams)... looks like I have to reread it :| to remember what it is :p

edit: having just googled it, and come up with many different answers, can you give me an idea of what X11 is, or give me a site where I can read up on it plz?

Greven
13-07-2005, 02:58 PM
X11 is used to display GUIs - without it, you would be stuck with command line.
Th great thing about it is it comes in 2 parts - a server that recieves instructions from the client & displays what it is told to, and a client that tells the server what to display.
You can tell the X client to send the instructions to any computer running an X server.