PDA

View Full Version : Wish to give Linux a try, what are the steps?



Renmoo
24-06-2005, 04:43 AM
Good day, folks. After participating this forum more than 3 months and hearing a lot of people praising the performance and reliability of Linux, I wish to give it a try. Note: A try. I will be probably using Xp Home as my computer's main OS. What are the free and recommended distros that you guys think is suitable for me? I am not a hardcore gamer, just occasionally play Chess and alike. Do I have to partition my HDD to allocate a certain volume of space for extra OS? I've got a 74.47GB HDD, and only 30 GB or so free. What are the first few steps that I should execute? Much thanks!

Cheers :)

beama
24-06-2005, 07:12 AM
If you want to try it out without an install I would reccomend one of the many live cd out there Knoppix seems to support most hardware ( I have had problems in the past with other live cds).

Basicly you boot off the cd and the linux OS is loaded into and runs from ram no changes are made to the harddrive of the machine.

Another live cd I some times use is puppy linux. It writes changes to a configuration file on your hard drive which it uses to set itself up on next boot ( file name pup).
Dick Smith sells A Ubuntu set which has a live cd included but I found it doesn't support my hardware it goes into Kernal Panic on load

google "linux live cd" youll find heaps.

somebody
24-06-2005, 07:55 AM
The SuSE Live cd is quite good, as is Mandrake Move 2.0. Both are available for free download from various mirrors.

FoxyMX
24-06-2005, 09:09 AM
I wish to give it a try. Note: A try. I agree with Beama - just play around with a live version to start with. Mepis is quite a good one.

Myth
24-06-2005, 09:19 AM
I would second the 'live CD' idea. Put one in and give it a whirl. Doesn't install (unless you want it to).
If you want to take it further and install a version, a lot of people recommend Xandros, then maybe Ubuntu. These 2 distros are said to be the easier installed distros to play round with.
I recently bought the live CD (Knoppix) from Dick Smith for $1 (mainly for their partitioning ability) and if you want Xandros Os3 (recent release), send me a PM with your address and I will send you a free copy burnt to CD (it came free with APC magzines June edition).
Best thing about Linux... its free (mostly*) so it can't be pirated :D

*some distros (mainly server) cost

personthingy
24-06-2005, 09:34 AM
I agree with Beama - just play around with a live version to start with. Mepis is quite a good one.I second that.... the beauty of MEPIS, is that it runs as a live CD so you can check if you like it, and that it likes your computer set up, and then gives you the options to install. When it does install it will detect all exsisiting OS and stuff, and will repartition the HDD making a seperate space for itself. At all stages you are in control. VERY simple clean and logical.

I'm running it as my only OS on my crappy little flaptop, and its the best its ever run.

Metla
24-06-2005, 10:05 AM
Damn, I was about to fly the flag of Mepis, But that seems to be already taken care of.

Bought time I built up another linux rig......

beama
24-06-2005, 10:26 AM
opps forgot mepis and I use it on a p2 196 ram it even detected my softmodem contexant chip but will not detect my lucent chip on the other pc

lazydog
24-06-2005, 11:16 AM
Good topic jameskan.
I've been interested in the same thing but not sure where/how to go about it.
After all the good reviews for mepis i think i'll try it out.
Does anyone in NZ sell it?. I'm only on dailup

Jen
24-06-2005, 11:34 AM
There is another thread running on live-CD's (plus Mepis) here (http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showthread.php?t=59152) which may answer some of your questions.

Does anyone in NZ sell it?. I'm only on dailupIf someone has the latest version which is SimplyMEPIS-3.3.1-1, then they might be able to post you a copy. I only have an earlier version, although I am tempted to download the lastest version out of interest.

Metla
24-06-2005, 11:41 AM
Anyone care to post a link to dl SimplyMEPIS-3.3.1-1?

Though I supose I should check what version I already have before downloading a new distro.

Jen
24-06-2005, 11:50 AM
Anyone care to post a link to dl SimplyMEPIS-3.3.1-1?

Though I supose I should check what version I already have before downloading a new distro.I put the list of download mirrors in that other thread, but here it is again ;)

List of mirrors (http://www.mepis.org/node/1462).

Make sure you get the iso with the 3.3.1-1 and not 3.3.1, as from the date the updated iso was only released two weeks ago.

Metla
24-06-2005, 11:52 AM
Excellent, I knew I made you mod for a reason. :thumbs:

B.M.
24-06-2005, 12:09 PM
Can I ask how big this Mepis 3.3.3-1 is?

Unfortunately only on Dial-up. :(

personthingy
24-06-2005, 12:34 PM
Can I ask how big this Mepis 3.3.3-1 is?

Unfortunately only on Dial-up. :(Its just under 700 Mb
Mepis comes with GIMP, media players, open office, ftp, webbrowser, audo editing...... and the list goes on and on and on.

Still, if you dont want to get it in a couple of overnight downloads, i'm sure it could be got for you......

Graham L
24-06-2005, 01:35 PM
Dick Smith have both Knoppix and Morphix at $1 for the two. That's making way for new releases, so not all branches will have copies still. XC4034 is the number to look for.

Myth
24-06-2005, 01:50 PM
Right now on TradeMe there are 2 Mepis distros and a heap of Knoppix for sale here... (http://www.trademe.co.nz/Computers/Software/Operating-systems/Linux/mcat-0002-0360-0243-1226-.htm)

Chilling_Silence
24-06-2005, 02:39 PM
Add me for Mepis/Knoppix/Slax praises :)

Xandros OCE 3.0 isnt too bad.... Ive never really been a debian fan thou

B.M.
24-06-2005, 04:47 PM
Got my disks from tricky Dickey thanks Graham.

Just a little query though and that is:

If one of these operating systems is installed to the HDD, can you update it the same as windows, or do you just completely delete and reinstall the later version?

Jen
24-06-2005, 05:00 PM
If one of these operating systems is installed to the HDD, can you update it the same as windows, or do you just completely delete and reinstall the later version?You update the software packages and system files as they get released (if you wish to). Depending upon the distro and how they handle updating it can be similiar to windows update except you are offered updates on everything installed - Office programs, Graphic programs, Music etc the lot.

If you wish to move to a newer version of your distro, then again depending upon your choice of distro and if they offer this, you just boot with the new install disk and select upgrade as your installation type.

Renmoo
24-06-2005, 06:54 PM
Thanks for the reply, everyone. Is it possible not to create a live CD and instead, use virtual CD-ROM program such as Daemon or something like that? Does Mepix have several versions? What's the minimum computer requirement to run Mepix? I've got a P4 3Ghz HT, 512 MB DDR RAM. I'm a patient young man who have the time to download <700MB Mepix, by the way. Is it a legal thing to do if someone bought a copy of Mepix or whatever other linux distro and lend it to me?

Cheers :)

personthingy
24-06-2005, 08:22 PM
Thanks for the reply, everyone. Is it possible not to create a live CD and instead, use virtual CD-ROM program such as Daemon or something like that? Does Mepix have several versions? What's the minimum computer requirement to run Mepix? I've got a P4 3Ghz HT, 512 MB DDR RAM. I'm a patient young man who have the time to download <700MB Mepix, by the way. Is it a legal thing to do if someone bought a copy of Mepix or whatever other linux distro and lend it to me?

Cheers :)It is not only legal, but encouraged that you make and distribute as many copys of Mepis, and indeed most Linux software as you see fit.

As for the first question.. Mepis IS a live CD, its only if you wish that it installs installs itself. Its default mode of operation is that it leaves your HDDs well alone!

Mepis is designed so that you can try it, see what you think, and install only if you like, and if it is pactical to do so. If you do install, it will offer you a choice of exsisting OS's, or that you run Mepis, probably with 2 different kernel options.

I'm running Mepis on a slug compared to what you have. I have 256 Mb RAM, a 1Ghz CPU, and onboard video.. Mepis will work quite well with what you have thinks me.

Myth
24-06-2005, 08:47 PM
The best thing I have found about Linux over Windows is the forum support, namely the level of support you get by very experienced users towards newbies (like me).
[this comment does not apply to the Windows users here, who are highly supportive of all users]

Another thing I have noticed about Windows and Linux... with some Windows users, there is a contingent who (to put this nicely) blow hot air about how highly specced their comp is.. however in Linux, there is a contingent who blow hot air about how lowly specced their comp is and the fact they run a modern O/S on the likes of a Pentium2.

Greven
24-06-2005, 09:28 PM
with some Windows users, there is a contingent who (to put this nicely) blow hot air about how highly specced their comp is.. however in Linux, there is a contingent who blow hot air about how lowly specced their comp is and the fact they run a modern O/S on the likes of a Pentium2.
I have a lot of respect for the linux pros - getting just about any distro working well on a pII these days requires a lot of hard work & dedication. Anyone can get a highly specced machine if they have enough money.

Some of the people raving on about their specs can be very funny - one of my friends bought an air conditioned case, and he didn't like it when everyone told him he was an idiot for running it at -25 degrees (yes, that is NEGATIVE 25 degrees).

johnd
24-06-2005, 09:49 PM
You update the software packages and system files as they get released (if you wish to). Depending upon the distro and how they handle updating it can be similiar to windows update except you are offered updates on everything installed - Office programs, Graphic programs, Music etc the lot.

If you wish to move to a newer version of your distro, then again depending upon your choice of distro and if they offer this, you just boot with the new install disk and select upgrade as your installation type.

One proviso that may need to be pointed out here - upgrades are done on the same distribution. If you want to change distributions, then a complete re-install is required.

Make sure that you make a /home partition when you install your first distribution. This is like making a d: drive in Windows for your data files. Then you can reformat the / (root) partition leaving your data intact.

Elephant
25-06-2005, 12:52 AM
Excellent, I knew I made you mod for a reason. http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/images/smilies/thumbs.gif

Which of course will make me banned and not you.
I'm told I can't actually comment.
It makes sense now.

Chilling_Silence
25-06-2005, 01:23 AM
Sounds like sour grapes if you ask me...... Did you even NEED to post in this thread? Leave well enough alone and stick to what you do best: Windows :)

Elephant
25-06-2005, 01:35 AM
There is another thread running on live-CD's (plus Mepis) here (http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/showthread.php?t=59152) which may answer some of your questions.
If someone has the latest version which is SimplyMEPIS-3.3.1-1, then they might be able to post you a copy. I only have an earlier version, although I am tempted to download the lastest version out of interest.

If people here actually read the original question you will (I think) find that Jameskan actually wants to use WinXP as the main operating system and also wants to install a version of Linux on one hard drive. Probably dual boot with *A* version of Linux and WinXP.

It may be helpful if all the Linux peple here can show Him/Her how to keep all the data already on the hard drive and partition the one hard drive to dual boot WinXP home and your favourite version of Linux.

The way I see it is that Linux will need 3 - 4 partions on a hard drive. WinXP will need one at least.

Elephant
25-06-2005, 01:47 AM
Thanks for the reply, everyone. Is it possible not to create a live CD and instead, use virtual CD-ROM program such as Daemon or something like that? Does Mepix have several versions? What's the minimum computer requirement to run Mepix? I've got a P4 3Ghz HT, 512 MB DDR RAM. I'm a patient young man who have the time to download <700MB Mepix, by the way. Is it a legal thing to do if someone bought a copy of Mepix or whatever other linux distro and lend it to me?

Cheers http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/images/smilies/smile.gif

Go to tricky dicky and pick up a version of Linux.
Did I have it wrong?
You still would like to use WinXP as the main O/S?

Your computer IMHO will have plenty of power to run any version of Linux. Your problem will probably be drivers for your current hardware. This will depend of course.

vinref
25-06-2005, 02:50 AM
Thanks for the reply, everyone. Is it possible not to create a live CD and instead, use virtual CD-ROM program such as Daemon or something like that? Does Mepix have several versions? What's the minimum computer requirement to run Mepix? I've got a P4 3Ghz HT, 512 MB DDR RAM. I'm a patient young man who have the time to download <700MB Mepix, by the way. Is it a legal thing to do if someone bought a copy of Mepix or whatever other linux distro and lend it to me?

Cheers :)

Mepis comes in one version - those different numbers refer to releases of the same thing. And as far as I know, there is only one Mepis, at least for i386 line of CPUs. Stick to the latest stable release because it is up to date with all the stability and security patches.

Your specs are overkill for linux, so it will run fine. The minimum specs for a gui-less linux running the 2.6.x kernel is around a 486DX100 CPU with 30Mb ram, but the installers require up to 128Mb for some distros (dunno about Mepis). You may have trouble with some video cards, softmodems, sound cards and some USB2.0 stuff, but these problems are becoming very rare actually.

Linux is open source. Have a look through wikipedia for a thorough definition and explanation of open source software.

By the way, you maybe able to download Mepis via bittorrent at http://www.tlm-project.org/. 700MB is still a bit much though - can I suggest NetBSD2.0.2 at 179MB?

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 03:03 AM
I'm lost in the FTP. Can someone tell me where do I go (ftp://ftp.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/mepis/released/) from here? Why there are 2 iso different date and file size?

Cheers :)

Rob99
25-06-2005, 03:12 AM
ftp://ftp.ibiblio.org/pub/linux/distributions/mepis/released/SimplyMEPIS-3.3.1-1.iso

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 03:19 AM
After downloading it, I just have to burn it into a cd and double-click that iso file, right? Thanks Rob for pinpointing out the URL for me!

Cheers :)

Rob99
25-06-2005, 03:25 AM
Use burning software to put the image on a disc, this will extract everything in the iso and write it on the disc.

Boot from the disc.

An iso file is simmilar to a zip, one main file that hold lots of others

Myth
25-06-2005, 07:34 AM
When in Windows, I use Nero to burn ISO images to burn to CD. NIce and easy :D
In Linux, I use K3b; if you have it (not sure if Mepis does have K3b). Its free, and very user friendly

Myth
25-06-2005, 07:56 AM
If people here actually read the original question you will (I think) find that Jameskan actually wants to use WinXP as the main operating system and also wants to install a version of Linux on one hard drive. Probably dual boot with *A* version of Linux and WinXP.

It may be helpful if all the Linux peple here can show Him/Her how to keep all the data already on the hard drive and partition the one hard drive to dual boot WinXP home and your favourite version of Linux.

The way I see it is that Linux will need 3 - 4 partions on a hard drive. WinXP will need one at least.
If you decide to install a version of Linux to dual boot with Windows, I have it set up like so:
Windows C: (called hda1 in Linux) is set on the master drive (40GB) in the active partition.
I also have a D: partition (called hda2) on the same drive (both are formatted as NTFS though FAT32 will suffice).
On the slave drive (80GB) I have a FAT32 partition (hdb1) for file swapping between Windows and Linux (mp3s, text docs, bookmarks for firefox etc).
I then have a 10GB partition (hdb2) which uses the / mount point (similar to C:, its the main file area for system files).
Next is a swap file (hdb3) which is user defined during setup. Mine is 1GB in size (the experts recommend 2* your memory, and I have 512 MB; hence 1GB swap). I think the maximum swap file size should be 2GB (but I may be wrong)
The final partition (hdb4) is the /home mount point (This is similar to My Documents in Windows... an area you can store user created, or downloaded files).
My setup is not perfect at this stage (still learning I am :)) and I will probably need to repartition (hopefully it can be done non-destructively using QPart) but it should give you an idea of how Linux is setup
All this applies if you decide to install only, not if you just want to run 'live CD' in memory only. This guide was also based on FC4, so Mepis may be different.

personthingy
25-06-2005, 09:14 AM
The final partition (hdb4) is the /home mount point (This is similar to My Documents in Windows... an area you can store user created, or downloaded files)./home is also where user preferences, and indeed anything particular to that user live.

(not sure if Mepis does have K3b) Yes Mepis has K3B, and what a great wee bit of burning software it is!

The way I see it is that Linux will need 3 - 4 partions on a hard drive. WinXP will need one at least. Mepis, and just about all other distros will want to have
"/" (a general system patition)
/home (personal files and settings)
/swap (self explanatory, and often optional)

Dont worry, Its own install program will sort all that out if you decide to install, which will of course increase preformance as you get the use of your RAM back that way. You could quite safely press OK blindly all the way, and it will create a partition holding your windows data, and additional partitions for *nix

personthingy
25-06-2005, 09:25 AM
If the 3 partitions seem confusing, consider this.
Earlier versions of most Linux distros also wanted a partition for "/etc" which is where all the non user specific settings and preferences lived. The advantage with that was that if you did a format and replace type upgrade, you would only touch "/" and the new set up would hopefully honour the settings defined in files found in /etc, so it would still know your IP, how your servers behaved and all that sort of thing.

While /etc is still used, it is usually by default housed in the generic "/" partition, and therefore lost if you format in order to try a different distro.

B.M.
25-06-2005, 12:25 PM
Very good guyís, I too have nearly plucked up enough courage to give it a go.

However, yet another question.

Can Knoppix and or Morphix handle old DOS programmes?

The reason I ask is I have a very old (in computer terms) DOS database & word processor programme called Q&A. Now this programme contains quite an extensive amount of data accumulated over many years. The wonderful thing about it is you can simply copy the whole programme complete with data from one computer or Hard Drive to another without having to run an installation programme.

Whilst the programme is perfectly legit (it cost a fortune at the time) the installation disks are the old 5 ľ inch floppies, which makes things a little tricky when you donít have a 5 ľ inch drive. :lol:

On reflection, it was nice to have programmes that stood alone and didnít need fancy registry entries etc.

Do Linux programmes stand-alone or have they followed the windows path?

vinref
25-06-2005, 01:01 PM
/home is also where user preferences, and indeed anything particular to that user live.
Yes Mepis has K3B, and what a great wee bit of burning software it is!
Mepis, and just about all other distros will want to have
"/" (a general system patition)
/home (personal files and settings)
/swap (self explanatory, and often optional)

Dont worry, Its own install program will sort all that out if you decide to install, which will of course increase preformance as you get the use of your RAM back that way. You could quite safely press OK blindly all the way, and it will create a partition holding your windows data, and additional partitions for *nix

It is generally a bad idea to use the "/" as a general system partition. You should separate "/" from anything else - it is almost always read only, and if this partition is damaged, you cannot boot the system. At most, "/" needs 150MB, and should be "read-only".

For a 10GB disk, you should allocate it thus, in this order from the outside in: "/" - 150MB, swap - 600MB, etc - 200MB, var - 200MB, usr - 5GB, home - the balance of the disk.

Myth
25-06-2005, 01:05 PM
For a 10GB disk, you should allocate it thus, in this order from the outside in: "/" - 150MB, swap - 600MB, etc - 200MB, var - 200MB, usr - 5GB, home - the balance of the disk.What are half of these partitions, and what is there purpose?

vinref
25-06-2005, 01:10 PM
Very good guy*s, I too have nearly plucked up enough courage to give it a go.

However, yet another question.

Can Knoppix and or Morphix handle old DOS programmes?

No. But I recommend FreeDOS (www.freedos.org). It is thought to run every DOS program you can think of. And it is open source, just like linux.


Do Linux programmes stand-alone or have they followed the windows path?

Most linux applications do not stand alone. Configuration files are kept in /etc (all as human-readable text files though), and are linked to libraries and such.

vinref
25-06-2005, 01:22 PM
What are half of these partitions, and what is there purpose?

The "/" holds the system files and the kernel (but not in some distros!). These are read during the booting process and that's it. They are never added to or modified, except during installation. Hence it should be protected andmade read-on. On my system, I won't even allow journalling on it. If it is damaged, you will need to boot with a rescue disk.

The swap partition should be enough to accomodate all the applications you would normally use, or the whole of the ram, whichever is greater. For Mepis, I reckon a nice round figure of 600MB is enough. During a system crash, the ram will dump its contents (the "core") into the swap for later analysis, so the swap need to big enough to accomodate this.

The /var partition stores logfiles, mail spools, print spools etc. It has a tendency to grow, and I hope Mepis has a mechanism to regularly flush the logs. If not, the log files may grow to damage anything else that's cooped up with it - especally "/".

/etc is where all configuration files are kept for system tools and user applications. You edit the configuration files to alter the behavious of applications and system tools.

/usr is where your application binaries go. When you install, say, Firefox, the binary goes in here and the configuration stuff goes into /etc.

/home is where you store your ill-gotten mp3s.

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 01:36 PM
I've just returned from my town's local Dick and Smith shop. One lady told me that they do not have stock for such OS as "Mepis" (seems that she does not know anything about Mepis). The closest name is Memphix or something like that. They are selling it for 10 bucks ($9.87). Anyone live in South Auckland? (Howick, to be specific)

Cheers :)

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 01:41 PM
If people here actually read the original question you will (I think) find that Jameskan actually wants to use WinXP as the main operating system and also wants to install a version of Linux on one hard drive. Probably dual boot with *A* version of Linux and WinXP.

It may be helpful if all the Linux peple here can show Him/Her how to keep all the data already on the hard drive and partition the one hard drive to dual boot WinXP home and your favourite version of Linux.

The way I see it is that Linux will need 3 - 4 partions on a hard drive. WinXP will need one at least.
Actually, I didn't know that you can boot a Linux OS from a CD until you people mentioned it. I thought it is a compulsory that OS must be installed on a machine before being used. Also, I specially emphasised on I want to try out Linux distro. My family members are used to GUI OS or simple user interface such as Xp. They think that Linux is meant for software developers and alike.

Cheers :)

Graham L
25-06-2005, 01:48 PM
Eh?

"/" is the root of the whole system tree. It contains a number of subsidiary areas:

/boot is included in most recent distributions. It contains the kernel binary, and the grub boot manager. It's read-only in normal operation, and is often given its own small partition.

/bin contains most of the user accessible commands.
/sbin contains many commands meant for use by the system administrator ("root").
/usr is meant for programmes and commands not part of the basic system ... usually locally added, but also the big /usr/X11 tree: the "X Window" system which lets you use a GUI. Some user-added proghrammes will go to /usr/share or /usr/option. There are more system type things in /usr/bin and /usr/sbin.
/var contains log files and various bits and pieces.

/usr, /bin, /sbin can be read-only; /var is frequently written to. There should be a cron.daily and cron.weekly "scheduled" process to purge the log files.

/home contains the user home directories, and any sub directories added by the users. This is usually a separate partition.
/mnt is a place holder tree. It has sub directories such as /mnt/cdrom, /mnt/floppy, /mnt/removable ... These are mount points. They are places in the file system where removable media are mounted so they can be used in the system.
/etc holds the configuration files. The places which things are put for various system and user things are not always consistent.

I would not give "/" 150 MB. :groan: That is not going to work. Unless you install something like one of the 5 x floppy mini-linuxes which install in a 20MB area on a DOS disk. ;)

Mandrake gave "/" 2GB in its automatic partioning for me once. I had to make another 100 MB partition and move the /usr/X11 stuff to it to make that system usable.

vinref
25-06-2005, 02:14 PM
Eh?

"/" is the root of the whole system tree. It contains a number of subsidiary areas:

I was wondering when you or Chill would pick up on this confusing aspect.

Yes, "/" is the root of the whole tree [b]as a directory structure[b]. But as a physical disk partition, it can be and should be separated, away from the likes of /var, /usr et cetera.

When you deliberately create partitions for /var, /etc, /usr, /home (the minimal in my mind), the installer sees this and puts whatever you have not explicitly defined separately, in with "/". This is usually "/boot", /bin, /dev, etc. These should be read-only until you have a good reason to modify them.

Form the Mepis site, it says that the minimum disk space needed is 2.5GB. That, and from my experience, 150MB for the "/" partition is more than enough. I don't know how obese linux distros have become, but it cannot possibly require GBs.

Graham L
25-06-2005, 02:33 PM
Most users should allow the installer to partition the disk. New users should always let the installer do this. There's enough mistakes to make on your own without doing that.

There is no real reason to separate "/" from the essential system subtrees. It is the root. I prefer a big bucket to plant a tree in, so the roots can wriggle their fingers. There are good reasons to physically separate some subtrees from "/". But you must have /bin , /sbin, /lib, for the system to run at all. If /sbin and /lib and /etc probably /dev (at least) aren't part of the physical / partition, you haven't got mount, nor the dynamic libraries to mount them.

It's best not to advise new users to do tricky things like deciding how to partition the disk. The default partitioning will give them a working system.

I prefer to let the developers know best unless I know they are wrong. ;) (I make a /cdrom because I don't like /mnt/cdrom, but that's my personal preference).

150 MB for the root partition is not enough. That's not distributionobesity. My problem with a 2MB / was real. That's because of stuff I added. That stuff went into /usr... . Thus the / partition became too small. The /home partition "automatic" size was far too big. I don't put huge MP3 files in it. :) It was empty, and the / partition was too small.

Myth
25-06-2005, 02:33 PM
Thanks Graham and Vinref, that clears it up a bit more for me.
I am interested in one thing, I know Knoppix is a live cd and therefore loads into memory. I also know it has a partitioning tool. Is this partitioning tool non-destructive when resizing (like Partition Magic).
I use Fedora Core 4... What size should these partitions be: /, /var, /etc, /tmp?
As mentioned before, I have linux on a 10GB / partition, a 1GB swap, and 20+ GB /home; as well as a 20GB vfat all on an 80GB harddrive.
How should I repartition the drive?

Graham L
25-06-2005, 02:37 PM
Mythix: It works? So don't fix it.

Myth
25-06-2005, 02:41 PM
Fair enough :D
And yes.. most of it does.

vinref
25-06-2005, 03:06 PM
Thanks Graham and Vinref, that clears it up a bit more for me.
I am interested in one thing, I know Knoppix is a live cd and therefore loads into memory. I also know it has a partitioning tool. Is this partitioning tool non-destructive when resizing (like Partition Magic).
I use Fedora Core 4... What size should these partitions be: /, /var, /etc, /tmp?
As mentioned before, I have linux on a 10GB / partition, a 1GB swap, and 20+ GB /home; as well as a 20GB vfat all on an 80GB harddrive.
How should I repartition the drive?

I am inclined to agree with Graham L.

You can repartition an existing installation of Fedora, but I highly discourage it unless you do a full back-up (actually, just /etc and /home). You cannot do this easily with Knoppix. The easiest and cleanest route is to backup and do a full reinstall. Do you have the install disks?

As for recommended sizes, I had a look at the Fedora site and it is vague on the topic. I think Fedora does not like you to change from the default.

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 03:40 PM
Help me... :help:

Graham L
25-06-2005, 03:50 PM
Oh yes, James.

It was your thread, wasn't it? :D Oh dear. :thumbs:

Try a Knoppix live CD first. If you can get that for $1 at DSE, it will let you see if you like the feel of Linux. It won't damage your Windows system. It just uses the CPU and peripherals. You might want to save the settings for Knoppix on a floppy or USB pendrive, but that's not compulsory.

32GB would be plenty for a Linux installation. Repartitioning always involves some risk. Sometimes users make mistakes. ;) See if you like Linux before you dive into that. It might pay to start another thread if you want to go ahead.

vinref
25-06-2005, 04:01 PM
Yes, like Graham L writes, try Knoppix first.

Just insert into your CD or DVD, and reboot. Give it a good run - use all the apps or equivalents, that you normally use in Windows:

Firefox/Opera
Gaim (IRC)
OpenOffice/Abiword (word processor)
XMMS/Amarok (audio)
Mplayer (DVD player)

If you run into any problems, post them.

Renmoo
25-06-2005, 04:13 PM
Is it the same, Morphix and Mepis?

Edward
25-06-2005, 04:27 PM
Bit late now, but a cheat way I use it is a tool called VMWare

what it does is essentially creates an emulator. it creats an Xgb (You decide how big) file to use as the HD, and allocate a certain amount of RAM. You can also use the host's floppy drive and CD drive, or alternatively an .iso image

The beauty is it's foolproof. To the guest OS, it's a completly seperate machine. It sees the HD file as an empty hard drive, so you can go wild and use all of the file, the host PC won't care. For all intents and purposes, it's it's own PC.

Best thing is there's no messy partitioning needed, and you can have multiple OSs running (Like multiple live CDs to test) at once

vinref
25-06-2005, 04:28 PM
No. Morphix and Mepis are different.

Although I recommended Knoppix, you can try any live-CD really. They do not touch your hard-drive or anything therein, so they are fairly safe to use.

personthingy
25-06-2005, 04:32 PM
Help me... :help:The installer of almost any distro will give you "/" , "/swap" , and "/home" by default. While there are sometimes reasons for dividing further, it is not a good idea unless you know exactly what you are doing.

/home needs seperation so that if you toss out one distro and replace it with another you will keep your files and settings.

The installer will put everthing not given specific alternative space into the "/" partition

Flaptop is set up with a 30 GB HDD. Thats just under 20 for /home , almost 1 GB for /swap (seeing i don't have enough RAM and tend to leave 20 windows open) and the rest for "/"
My /home partition is full as i collect .oggs & .mp3s.
/swap is probably bigger than it need be.
/ (the root partition) has room on it.

My previous system was set up on a 80 GB HDD with a seperate extra partiton i imaginatively called "/share" that took up over half the drive and provided clearly defined space for files openly shared on the network for my other machines to see.

I had a second 120 GB HDD for /home as i had collected over 45 GB of music (12,000 titles) and more than a few videos.

The options are endless, but you will not need to do any of this manually at first because the installer will suggest appropriate and simple ways of chopping up the Linux section of your HDD, which i suspect will be minamal (at first ;) )

personthingy
25-06-2005, 04:42 PM
My vote for a live CD is still Mepis, i have tried various versions of knoppix, and find Mepis a tad better, plus its a lot harder to install knoppix if you like it, where as Mepis has this option built into the same CD.

Having said that, knoppix is a good system and a worthwhile learning expererment.

Chilling_Silence
25-06-2005, 05:51 PM
MS-Dos under Linux? DOS Apps? Sure...

Google for DOSBox :)

'nuff said!

personthingy
25-06-2005, 08:37 PM
James,
After talking to you on GAIM (you were probably on msn) i've realised that there may be some confusion about the command line thing.

Once upon a time the command line was all Linux users had. While it remains a good tool, common tasks can be done using a menu similar to windows or mac. To give a simple example of how it works, one may find out who owns an IP by typing "whois 22.22.22.22" Heres the result:

[~]# whois 22.22.22.22

OrgName: DoD Network Information Center
OrgID: DNIC
Address: 7990 Science Applications Ct
Address: M/S CV 50
City: Vienna
StateProv: VA
PostalCode: 22183-7000
Country: US

NetRange: 22.0.0.0 - 22.255.255.255
CIDR: 22.0.0.0/8
NetName: DISNET
NetHandle: NET-22-0-0-0-1
Parent:
NetType: Direct Allocation
Comment: Defense Information Systems Agency
Comment: 7990 Science Applications Court
Comment: Vienna, VA 22183-7000 US
RegDate: 1989-06-26
Updated: 2001-10-11

TechHandle: MIL-HSTMST-ARIN
TechName: Network DoD
TechPhone: +1-703-676-1051
TechEmail: HOSTMASTER@nic.mil

OrgTechHandle: MIL-HSTMST-ARIN
OrgTechName: Network DoD
OrgTechPhone: +1-703-676-1051
OrgTechEmail: HOSTMASTER@nic.mil

# ARIN WHOIS database, last updated 2005-06-24 19:10
# Enter ? for additional hints on searching ARIN's WHOIS database.


This is generally done in a "shell" which is simply a window for typing commands in. command lines can be used for a varity of tasks, but for most common tasks, just click the icon, as you do now.

Most people who use my computer don't notice any great difference other than different program names and so forth.

Greven
26-06-2005, 04:08 PM
Bit late now, but a cheat way I use it is a tool called VMWare

VMWare is expensive, and there is usually a performance hit as you are running 2 full operating systems at the same time.

The IT department at my polytech don't have a clue about linux, so they installed vmware on all the BIT computers & decreed that we could do anything we want in VMWare, but there would be hell to pay if we touched their windows instillation. Fedora runs OK (not great) now that we have 512mb RAM in all the computers, but when we only had 256, any OS ran like a dog in VMWare.

Chilling_Silence
26-06-2005, 10:32 PM
Try Qemu if you're really set on installing it but dont want to yet re-partition. It'll be slow... But still useable :)

Just google for Qemu, I use it all the time!

personthingy
29-06-2005, 09:58 AM
James, have you looked any further into giving Linux a try?
How did it go?

Renmoo
29-06-2005, 05:46 PM
James, have you looked any further into giving Linux a try?
How did it go?
Thanks for your concern, Chris. I'd just collected a copy of Knoppix and Morphix from the school office, which was sent by Mythix (Real thanks a lot!) from Waitara. I followed you people's advice and booted up the computer via CD-ROM (talking about Morphix). However, I am annoyed at one thing. I can't change the screen resolution to a bigger one. The default size is 640 x 480, which makes all the icons very big and there isn't enough space for me to view the Help index properly. I am also a bit stuck on setting up the dial-up connection. I am on Xtra dial-up. By the way, how do I "quit Morphix and shut down the computer"? The only logical button seems to be "log off". Upon clicking log off, the computer seems to hang. I wonder, does Ctrl + Alt + Del works in Linux? In the end, I press the power button to restart it. How does the computer remember configuration on Morphix since I do not install it? I mean, Morphix only takes up the memory, but I thought memory is volatile, which means the data will be gone once the computer is shut down? Sorry for asking so much of questions, but I am darn interested in operating a new software (an operating system, to be exact). Thanks a lot, people! (especially Mythix!)

Cheers :)

personthingy
29-06-2005, 06:21 PM
Thanks for your concern, Chris. I'd just collected a copy of Knoppix and Morphix from the school office, which was sent by Mythix (Real thanks a lot!) from Waitara. I followed you people's advice and booted up the computer via CD-ROM (talking about Morphix). However, I am annoyed at one thing. I can't change the screen resolution to a bigger one. The default size is 640 x 480, properly.I dont use Morphix but heres what works for me in MEPIS.
Right click on any empty space on the desk top
Select : configure desktop
Select : Display
Options will be layed out in front of you.
If you cant see them, you can drag the config window to the left by using a click and drag tecnique, but dont double click, or you will shade the window, which means reducing it to the top bar only, which wont help at this stage.

You may have a situation where your video card was not detected properly. This is why things have gone to the lowest default. If all fails try Knoppix.


. By the way, how do I "quit Morphix and shut down the computer"? The only logical button seems to be "log off". Upon clicking log off, the computer seems to hang. I wonder, does Ctrl + Alt + Del works in Linux? In the end, I press the power button to restart it.
Under MEPIS Ctrl +Alt + Del gives you a logout window, Ctrl +Alt + Backspace gives you an emergency stop of KDE (graphics interface) where upon it restarts and lets you log back in.
. How does the computer remember configuration on Morphix since I do not install it? I mean, Morphix only takes up the memory, but I thought memory is volatile, which means the data will be gone once the computer is shut down? Some live distros let you save a little .config file on the HDD, but otherwise your assumption is correct. You lose everything as soon as you shutdown. Live CDs are testing devices, and they have certain disadvantages, such as these.

*disclaimer I'm basing my advice on a installed version of MEPIS, which may or may not work for you in your slightly different distro, and live CD status.

personthingy
29-06-2005, 06:27 PM
One point i should raise is that not all distros can be garenteed to detect your hardware. I settled on FC3 for quite a while, but couldn't get sound. MEPIS was the winner of the next round simply because i got everything i wanted working in one install, and so far only had to add evolution, (an email client) and NVU (web designing software) Live CDs have less resourses, but each one is different, learn what you can from each one, but if you hit a wall, just try another one.

personthingy
29-06-2005, 06:49 PM
If you cant see empty space on your desk top, under Linux you can open another one.

At the panel you will see at the bottom of the screen, you will see a set of boxes labeled "1" "2" etc There will probably be either 2 or 4. Each opens a seperate desktop allowing the grouping of related tasks.

Typical day for me sees
1 = Email clients and Web browser (firefox)
2 = Music files, and player (xmms)
3 = Spare
4 = Gaim (multi proticol instant messaging)

Morgenmuffel
29-06-2005, 11:14 PM
NVU (web designing software)

sorry to hijack the thread a bit,

Personthingy

2 Questions
1) What is NVU like to use, I use dreamweaver and am not likely to change but it would be nice to have something that works under linux, i have read up on it, but most of the reviews were for earlier versions.

2) You're the token herbivore aren't you :D, I can't remember if your a Dunedinite or Cantabrian, but as I may be heading to Dunners in a few weeks, are there any good vegan shops up there (my wife is vegan), as there isn't a lot of stuff down here, and have you ever heard of "red star nutritional yeast" as we have been looking for it in vain down here, apparently it's a good source of B12, If you're not from up there, don't worry about it

Thanks

personthingy
29-06-2005, 11:35 PM
sorry to hijack the thread a bit,

Personthingy

2 Questions
1) What is NVU like to use, I use dreamweaver and am not likely to change but it would be nice to have something that works under linux, i have read up on it, but most of the reviews were for earlier versions.I dont make very complex pages. I find NVU can deal with anything i want to do, allthough it lacks some of the nicetys one is used to under linux. Its a pain having to do windows style cutting and pasting when your used to highlighting and middle clicking. However NVU can do a lot i'd never bother using.


2) You're the token herbivore aren't you :D, I can't remember if your a Dunedinite or Cantabrian, but as I may be heading to Dunners in a few weeks, are there any good vegan shops up there (my wife is vegan), as there isn't a lot of stuff down here, and have you ever heard of "red star nutritional yeast" as we have been looking for it in vain down here, apparently it's a good source of B12, If you're not from up there, don't worry about it

ThanksToken herbivore??? Guilty as charged your honour!
I'm a Cantabrian i'm afraid, and the only "vegan" shop i know of in Dunners was part owned by an old friend of mine and went down about 20 years ago...

Yeast brand is irrelivant, unless you like paying money for brand names. Most heath or organic supply shops should have flakey yeast.. Let your fingers do the walking www.yellowpages.co.nz B12 is also in mushrooms, or so i've been led to believe.

JJJJJ
30-06-2005, 05:53 AM
Good day, folks. After participating this forum more than 3 months and hearing a lot of people praising the performance and reliability of Linux, I wish to give it a try. Note: A try. I will be probably using Xp Home as my computer's main OS. What are the free and recommended distros that you guys think is suitable for me? I am not a hardcore gamer, just occasionally play Chess and alike. Do I have to partition my HDD to allocate a certain volume of space for extra OS? I've got a 74.47GB HDD, and only 30 GB or so free. What are the first few steps that I should execute? Much thanks!

Cheers :)
Unless you are an expert forget about Linux. I have twice installed it, but found I could not live without modem, scanner, and printer. And a mouse that only worked sometimes.
Then trying to uninstall ended with me buying a new hard drive. If you are a sucker for punishment have a play by all means.

Myth
30-06-2005, 07:50 AM
Unless you are an expert forget about Linux. I have twice installed it, but found I could not live without modem, scanner, and printer. And a mouse that only worked sometimes.
Then trying to uninstall ended with me buying a new hard drive. If you are a sucker for punishment have a play by all means.
Each distro of Linux I have noticed has its quirks... for example;
I noticed that FC3 didn't like a Winmodem (most distros don't) but I did notice that Ubuntu did see it (though I don't know if it worked - didn't try it as I was doing other things with it)
Mandrake didn't like my MS USB mouse; no other distro has had a problem with it
Xandros kicked me offline after 15-30 seconds (on a dialup linux-compatible external modem)

I have been using Linux for about 3 months, I now use it 98% of the time at home (and I am on the computer a lot).

Unless you are an expert forget about Linux. I never started in a Unix based world till 3 months ago... how do you become expert if you don't use it or play round with it?


Without learning... is there living?

personthingy
30-06-2005, 09:31 AM
Then trying to uninstall ended with me buying a new hard drive. If you are a sucker for punishment have a play by all means.O dear.

I think this sort of thing is why live CDs are good, you try see if you like and only then does one install. As for your "ended with me buying a new hard drive" experiance, i find that astounding! Was it not possible to reformat the linux partitions as fat32 so any OS, even windows could use them? :confused:

Under FC3 i had no sound, all other distros i tried liked my hardware with the exeption of not liking having a USB mouse and a trackpadthingy. I never tried FC4, perhaps the known fedora bug had been fixed by then, and sound worked?

Linux is an evolving system, which is one of the reasons that MEPIS has so few bugs. Under MEPIS everything was found and installed correctly first time. Bugs are so minamal as to be amusing, like how informing the system as root that metric is prefered caused the log in dialog box thing and nothing else to suddenly read in german. That honestly is the biggest bug.

Just to be pedantic about the above paragraph, i have no use for my modem, and therefore can not say if it works. One day i'll try someones internet name/pass just to find out, but other than experermental value, i'll stick with cable thanks.

Chilling_Silence
30-06-2005, 02:52 PM
Nicely said.

Renmoo
01-07-2005, 08:01 PM
I dont use Morphix but heres what works for me in MEPIS.
Right click on any empty space on the desk top
Select : configure desktop
Select : Display
Options will be layed out in front of you.
If you cant see them, you can drag the config window to the left by using a click and drag tecnique, but dont double click, or you will shade the window, which means reducing it to the top bar only, which wont help at this stage.

You may have a situation where your video card was not detected properly. This is why things have gone to the lowest default. If all fails try Knoppix.

Both Knoppix and Morphix does not allow me to configure the screen resolution of the desktop. In Knoppix, under the resolution section, upon clicking the drop down menu, the only available resolution is 640 x 480. I heard before that there is such software as MultiResolution whereby you can change your desktop to any resolution that you desire. My computer is using Intel Integrated Graphics 2. On the other hand, that software only works with Windows (I think). I guess that's why Linux is not that popular... Besides this, how do you pronounce the word "Linux"? Is it "leee-nix" or "lee-nucks"? Lastly, is there any (built-in) software that allows application meant for Windows to run under Linux condition? Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)

Prescott
01-07-2005, 09:30 PM
WINE will allow you to run windows based programs under linux. i think you will need to download the linux version of your intergrated graphics version. run everest in windows and this will tell you what you have and give you a link to the driver page, then find the linux driver, if there is one...

i always thought you pronounce linux as "lie-nux'' or ''ly-nux'' :illogical

personthingy
02-07-2005, 03:03 AM
Both Knoppix and Morphix does not allow me to configure the screen resolution of the desktop. In Knoppix, under the resolution section, upon clicking the drop down menu, the only available resolution is 640 x 480. I heard before that there is such software as MultiResolution whereby you can change your desktop to any resolution that you desire. My computer is using Intel Integrated Graphics 2. At a guess i would say that your graphics card was not properly detected by these two distros. Because of this, the system can only offer the minamum possible settings. One of the disadvantages with live CD is that it is somewhat difficult to install install additional drivers or other software without installing the OS. As installing an OS that may not work is clearly not an option at this stage, my only suggestion is try another distro or two as you get the chance. I have no idea which, if any, current distros may handle your graphics card.

I'm sorry that your first expererment with Linux has not as yet been a successful one. :(

Chilling_Silence
02-07-2005, 03:12 AM
From Knoppix, try this:
Hit Ctrl + Alt + F2
Now you should see a console, run the following:
cd /etc/X11/
mv xorg.conf xorg.backup
xorgconfig

Run through the configuration and then type:
startx -- :1


Chill.

personthingy
02-07-2005, 03:31 AM
Hey Chill!

Could you explain for the benefit of our listeners just what each step of those commands does?

After a year or three of using Linux, i can make a guess as to what your doing here, but to the uninitiated i'm sure thats a tad overwelming!

:D

Renmoo
02-07-2005, 07:35 AM
From Knoppix, try this:
Hit Ctrl + Alt + F2
Now you should see a console, run the following:
cd /etc/X11/
mv xorg.conf xorg.backup
xorgconfig

Run through the configuration and then type:
startx -- :1


Chill.
What's this command for? :waughh: :confused:

personthingy
02-07-2005, 09:49 AM
What's this command for? :waughh: :confused:I think you'll find that its moving your powers to the appropriate part of the system, then making a backup of the current configeration, then asking it to have a good look at the situation and configure accordingly, then run the new configeration.....

Its a pain i know, but it might just sort all your problems out untill you reboot.
If it were an installed system, you'd only need to do this once, and changes would be saved. Because its a live CD, you get to do this everytime you try it!

wooohooo! :D

Renmoo
02-07-2005, 10:54 AM
I'd tried out the steps recommended by Chill, but I am stuck at the beginning stage. When the OS is completely booted up, I pressed the keys Ctrl + Alt + F12, a blank screen with a horizontal cursor blinking appeared. I then type in "cd /etc /X11", but nothing appeared. I tried typing in other keys, but nothing would work. The only combination key that gave an effect is Ctrl + Alt + Del whereby I was taken into the screen saying "Knoppix halted" and the computer was shut down. Anymore ideas? Oh! By the way, at the beginning stage when I loaded in the CD and booted it, there was a message that appeared which says "Please press <Return> key or .... mode number ........ <spacebar> or continue to wait 30 seconds". I can't exactly remember the message it said. Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)

Greven
02-07-2005, 11:49 AM
I think they are trying to take you to command line. ctrl+alt+F1 will get you there.
If that is what they are trying to get you to do, you can probably do whatever you need to do in an Xterm window.

Chilling_Silence
02-07-2005, 12:43 PM
Well, I s'pose you can.

lets try this again:
In Kde, down the bottom next to the K-menu is a Penguin Icon. Click it. One of the options in the new menu that appears will be "root console" or something to that effect.
type:

cd /etc/X11
This is changing into the directory where the display configuration is held. Now type:

mv xorg.conf xorg.backup
We are moving/renaming the config file to a backup config. We need to do this because the LiveCD will not allow you to simply amend (Although it may do now that UnionFS has been implemented, ive not used the most recent version. This is tried/tested from Knoppix-3.3 to Knoppix-3.7)
Now, run:

xorgconfig
This will give you a command line tool which will ask you approx 10 simple questions. If you are unsure about screen refresh rates then just press Enter.
Once you are done here, you have updated your config file, press Ctrl + Alt + F1.
You'll then see the main console, you may need to Press Enter once.
So, you've got a nice big black screen with the boot writing still showing. Type:

startx -- :1
What this does is starts another Kde session, only this time it'll use the most recent config file which has your screen settings as you like.
You can switch between both Kde sessions with Ctrl + Alt + F5/F6/F7 etc etc.


Chill.

Renmoo
02-07-2005, 06:04 PM
I managed to get to the root shell and changed the pathway, but when I typed in the next command, it does not recognise "xorg.conf" after the word "mv". Does the spacing matters? Is there a space between etc/ and X11? Should it be etc/X11 or etc /X11? Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)

personthingy
02-07-2005, 06:12 PM
I managed to get to the root shell and changed the pathway, but when I typed in the next command, it does not recognise "xorg.conf" after the word "mv". Does the spacing matters? Is there a space between etc/ and X11? Should it be etc/X11 or etc /X11? Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)The spacing matters. There would be no spaces in the middle of the directory location "etc/X11/"

Jen
02-07-2005, 11:00 PM
I managed to get to the root shell and changed the pathway, but when I typed in the next command, it does not recognise "xorg.conf" after the word "mv". Does the spacing matters? Is there a space between etc/ and X11? Should it be etc/X11 or etc /X11?Each command that Chill gave you needs to be all on one line, it sounds like you just used "cd" first. You are also leaving out the / in /etc in your examples too. The / indicates the path is relative to the root directory /. Try again using the exact characters and spacing (and case sensitivity) that Chill gave. A good command to use anywhere is pwd, (print working/current directory) to make sure you are where you should be, as it reports the full file path of your current location.

Chilling_Silence
03-07-2005, 09:38 AM
Knoppix does use xorg-x11, doesnt? Im sure they ditched xfree86!?!

personthingy
03-07-2005, 02:15 PM
James,
Linux is an evolving system.
Each new distro is a combination of latest offerings and proven favourates.

Knoppix too is everchanging. To answer questions such as "is /etc/X11/ the right path for knoppix?" the version number would help. I may have the same version as what you are trying to run, i may not. If i do, i will gladly have a look.

cd /etc/X11 is the right comand if etc/X11 where knoppix keeps the config file your after.

what this command means is
cd = change to the following directory
/etc/X11

/etc/X11
/ = root(the heart of the directory tree)
etc/ = a directory within this, followed by sub directory X11

Graham L
03-07-2005, 02:25 PM
/etc/X11 is most likely the correct place for configuration files for X11. In the same way that /usr/X11 will be the base of the tree for X11's programmes.

These places in the file sytem are not arbitrarily determined by distribution people. There is a standard layout of the system stuff, which noone would dare to "improve" on.

Any distribution-specific changes of major things like that would be only in the direction of correcting previous "errors". Even then, they would leave evidence in the form of symbolic links (so that people used to their old bad ways can still function ;)).

personthingy
03-07-2005, 02:41 PM
I hate it when i realise that what i typed really wasn't what i meant and made little if any sence.

Nevermind. too late to edit and make it worse now.

James, when your next online, give me a yell, tell me what version you are running, and if i have that, or one close, i'll fire it up and go through the process as closely as i can so i can guide you through it. Keep in mind though that as i'm running a different machine i'm not going to get the problems you have, but i can still go through the "xorgconfig" process and see what happens.

Betterstill, post the version numbers here. :)

Renmoo
03-07-2005, 06:24 PM
I'm still stuck, Chris, after being tutored by you. Check this screenshot (http://www.sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/helpmejames.jpg) out
The version of Knoppix is 3.4 while Morphix is 0.4

Cheers :)

personthingy
03-07-2005, 06:38 PM
I'm still stuck, Chris, after being tutored by you. Check this screenshot (http://www.sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/helpmejames.jpg) out
The version of Knoppix is 3.4 while Morphix is 0.4

Cheers :)OK... well the good news is that you have been following instructions right......

What an awful screen resolution!
If you feel that you've been thrown into the deep end you have.
Something is very not right

It appears that there is no xorg.conf file

What happens if you go directly to the next step and run xorgconfig ?

Other than that, i have no suggestions!

BTW, well done posting a screen shot from a machine with less screen realestate than the menu!

Jen
03-07-2005, 07:45 PM
Knoppix still uses XFree86 and not xorg. This could be behind the "file not found" message :D

Try in /etc/X11:

mv XF86Config-4 XF86Config-4-backup

Then run this:

dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86

You will need to answer the questions, uses the arrow and tab keys to navigate around. Under the Monitor question, choose the middle or Advanced option so that you can specify your resolution/refresh rate.

Having to reconfigure Live-CD's is hard, as the changes are not permanent unlike with hard drive installations. Personally I would try a different distro.

Good luck.

Renmoo
03-07-2005, 07:51 PM
Knoppix still uses XFree86 and not xorg. This could be behind the "file not found" message :D

Try in /etc/X11:

mv XF86Config-4 XF86Config-4-backup

Then run this:

dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86

You will need to answer the questions, uses the arrow and tab keys to navigate around. Under the Monitor question, choose the middle or Advanced option so that you can specify your resolution/refresh rate.

Having to reconfigure Live-CD's is hard, as the changes are not permanent unlike with hard drive installations. Personally I would try a different distro.

Good luck.
Perhaps, Jen, could you explain to me what does the command lines do towards the resolution? What is XFree86, anyway? Thanks again!

Cheers :)

Jen
03-07-2005, 08:05 PM
The X server runs the X Window System display, aka the pretty GUI things. Quoted from the xfree86 website (http://www.xfree86.org/): XFree86, provides a client/server interface between display hardware (the mouse, keyboard, and video displays) and the desktop environment while also providing both the windowing infrastructure and a standardized application interface (API).

Xorg is a different X server that is used by many Linux distro's. Knoppix still uses the XFree86 X server. Those commands above first make a backup copy of your original configuration file (although this isn't really necessary because rebooting wipes out your modified one anyway) and then the next command is running the configuration program for XFree86 so that you can manually pick better choices for your monitor that the system did by default.

personthingy
03-07-2005, 08:37 PM
When you boot up knoppix, or any live CD, one of the first things knoppix has to do is take a look at your hardware, and if not recignise it, it must at least work out its capabilitys, and from that it gives you the options of screen resolutions and so forth to match what it is assumed to be capable of.

In your case something didn't quite go right. Because of this, you are being offered poor options.

Xfree86 (not xorg as first assumed) is the part of the system that sorts all this out, or in your case sorts some of this out...... :(

dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86
is the command that will allow you to manually input information and overide the mistakes that were made when the CD was fired up. After this HOPEFULLY you will have better display options.

If you would like me to send you a copy of MEPIS, just sing out, allthough i just had a look and found that it too uses XFree86, so it may not solve your problem.

Renmoo
12-07-2005, 09:52 PM
After inputting the command "cd /etc/X11/" and "mv XF86Config-4 XF86Config-4-backup" and "dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86", I was faced with this screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/snapshotlinux1.jpg) . I then selected XF86 (hopefully I am making the right choice) and faced with a new screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/snapshotlinux2.jpg). How should I proceed on from the second screen? Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)

personthingy
12-07-2005, 10:47 PM
After inputting the command "cd /etc/X11/" and "mv XF86Config-4 XF86Config-4-backup" and "dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86", I was faced with this screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/snapshotlinux1.jpg) . I then selected XF86 (hopefully I am making the right choice) and faced with a new screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/snapshotlinux2.jpg). How should I proceed on from the second screen? Thanks a lot!

Cheers :)that depends on your card... what one did you say you had again?

Renmoo
12-07-2005, 11:07 PM
that depends on your card... what one did you say you had again?
Which "one" were you refering to, Chris?

personthingy
12-07-2005, 11:22 PM
Which "one" were you refering to, Chris?What type of video/graphics card do you have?

Renmoo
18-07-2005, 07:47 PM
Hello again. After identifying the video graphics card as i810, I was faced with this screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj.jpg) (Appologies to folks who have to squint their eyes to view the screenshot), to which I entered "Intel Integrated Graphics 2". Pressing the key "Enter" brought me to this screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(1).jpg) . Since my computer has only 1 CRT monitor and no additional display device, I left the box empty and proceed on (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(2).jpg) . It then ask me to input the amount of RAM that my graphics card uses, which I have no idea about (I checked it via Windows later on, it says 96MB) and entered instead 128000 KB (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(3).jpg) (Does this really matter?). Next, it asked me for the type of keyboard I am using, I just leave it as xfree86 (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(11).jpg) (The computer automatically filled in the box). After pressing "enter", I was faced with a new screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(5).jpg) . I then pressed "Enter" and another screen appeared (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(6).jpg) . Since my keyboard is just a typical Dell keyboard, I leave it as "pc101". "Enter" again, and this screen showed (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(7).jpg). I identify it as "us" model (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(8).jpg). Should I change it to "NZ"? My dad bought this Dell Dimension 4600 computer from Malaysia, however. What stopped me from proceeding on is this screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(10).jpg) and this (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(11).jpg) . After pressing "Enter" to a screen which I hardly understand, I was faced with this (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(12).jpg) . My mouse is a PS/2 mouse, which option should I select? Thanks for your time!

Cheers :)

Chilling_Silence
18-07-2005, 07:57 PM
/dev/psaux for PS/2

Geez thats a lot different from xorg-config which I normally use.. or is it xorgcfg

personthingy
18-07-2005, 11:36 PM
(The computer automatically filled in the box). After pressing "enter", I was faced with a new screen (http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/linuxj_(5).jpg) . I then pressed "Enter" and........I'm surprised at the PC101 choice! Most modern keyboards are "pc104" and have a "logo" key that has the M$windows logo thing printed on it......

At least i assume thats what they mean by "PC104"

Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.......
*wonders about the possibility of getting a keyboard with Tux on the logo keys :D*

Chilling_Silence
19-07-2005, 12:22 AM
I select PC105...

And Im sure you can.. I believe it was Metla who posted a keyboard in the PCW Chat Forum thread that had LCD's that changed the imge displayed :D