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Aurealis_
23-04-2005, 08:55 PM
I have two Compaq T1010 Thin Clients. I have no idea how to set them up.

Would anyone be able to help me out? I'm looking for an OS recommendation first of all. I tried settin up a "Terminal Server" on a Windows 2000 Server machine but I didn't really know what I was doing and therefore didn't have any success.

Also, I am expecting these machines to be able to run applications that reside on the server. Is this possible? I understand that because the clients are low-spec they obviously won't handle anything extremely taxing. But, what are their limits? I figure that if they run of the server it is the servers resources which get consumed...

Any help will be a huge relief and greatly appreciated.

pctek
24-04-2005, 10:08 AM
Hire a network tech.

dolby digital
24-04-2005, 11:03 AM
Hire a network tech.

Yes, I tend to agree with Pctek (and part with your hard earned cash). Although Microsoft provide wizards for alot of the server setup, it does require some skill to do it :confused:

Graham L
24-04-2005, 03:48 PM
The processor is 233 MHz, and the standard software is WinCE. I saw one mention that American Express were buying 25000 of them. ;) So they must be usable. Compaq say the setup time is "15 minutes."

The similar (256MB, 300 MHz ?) ones here started with WinCE, but are now using Embedded XP, from a Citrix Metaframe server. (They sometimes die past Ctrl/Alt/Del and need to be poowered down and up so I see the boot process ;)).

You might be able to run them from a Linux server, "Compaq t1010 linux" to Google found some links which might be worth following. It might even be possible to run a Linux kernel with an X-Window server, and that would be a useful system.

vinref
24-04-2005, 03:56 PM
I was quite interested in those things a wee while ago, until I noticed the plummetting price of used PCs.

If you know your way around Linux or BSD, you can set them up with x-windows (as a server) for client applications running on a more powerful machine (yes, it sounds like it is backwards, but that's the way x-windows works). Check out the Linux Terminal Server Project (ltsp.org). Otherwise you will have to make do with NT(?).

Just a note about the Citrix server that Graham L mentioned. They have that set up at the state library here. Man oh man that thing sux. Always breaks down, slow as hell and everyone - the librarians, users, IT people... they all hate it.

pctek
24-04-2005, 05:18 PM
I worked at a large NZ manufacturer as IT support and they installed Citrix. What a dog. I knew nothing about it before and after I decided I never wanted to know more. The users agreed. The accountants loved it - well at least until they discovered there was a sudden need for more servers.

whetu
25-04-2005, 12:10 AM
citrix and the ica protocol are actually quite good, you just need someone who knows what they're doing to set them up properly.

MS Terminal Services is essentially "Citrix Lite" and "a citrix sale is a microsoft sale" (yes, they actually say those words)


The accountants loved it

Sounds like they loved cutting back on the budget for the server(s) too, typical "we dont need to research business decisions" manglement at its best. ;)

Basically, if you have a small company (one or a few offices), you can get away with Terminal Services on one grunty server or two load balanced servers w/ NAS. When you start to need more than two servers and you need to prioritise your traffic better, and you need a protocol that will work fine over remote, slow and/or high latency connections, and you need more advanced client support tools, you need Citrix and ICA.

So, let us take the old addage: "it's not the OS, it's the admin" and apply that to Citrix as well.

Yes, I work with Citrix a considerable amount ;)


Also, I am expecting these machines to be able to run applications that reside on the server. Is this possible? I understand that because the clients are low-spec they obviously won't handle anything extremely taxing. But, what are their limits? I figure that if they run of the server it is the servers resources which get consumed...

You assume correct. Thin Clients are an evolution of the old dumb terminal days - most of the processing, data storage, application storage, permissions, virus protection etc is all centralised to a server or server farm. All the Thin Client really has to do is some basic local computation and user interfacing.

Best bet - go with what vinref said.

Aurealis_
25-04-2005, 12:25 AM
Cheers for your response guys. Especially you whetu.

It's sounding good after what you said. Before that I was ready to list them on Trademe at $1 with no reserve.

Unfortunately I'm not at all familiar with Linux. If any of you would be kind enough to recommend a distribution though I'll go and download it, install it on my server and tinker and break until I care no more.

Very impressed with this community. Top stuff.

vinref
25-04-2005, 01:23 PM
... If any of you would be kind enough to recommend a distribution though I'll go and download it, install it on my server and tinker and break until I care no more.

Very impressed with this community. Top stuff.

Had a quick google and I see that Fedora has the ltsp package, so it will be easy to install, and hopefully, easy to configure as well.

Good luck with the tinkering - best way to learn.

Aurealis_
25-04-2005, 01:28 PM
Which CDs' should I download Vinref? I know that sometimes CD3 and CD4 are extra programs and packages that aren't needed for the core installation. But ltsp is probably one of those 'extras'

vinref
25-04-2005, 02:18 PM
I assume it would be on the 3rd or 4th disks, but you may get away with downloading the first two disks, and then go looking for that one particular app and download it by itself. I have not used Fedora for a wee while. Someone else who is currently familiar should be able to help.

vinref
30-04-2005, 12:52 AM
According to this article (http://www.computerworld.com.au/index.php/id;1774372754;fp;16;fpid;0), Ubuntu is teaming up with the LTSP. Watch this space.

Murray P
30-04-2005, 01:08 AM
IMO, Ubuntu is still a bit raw to be using in a business environment, if that's the case. Plenty of CD's kicking around at the mo though, have 10 myself.

vinref
30-04-2005, 01:11 AM
Yeah, I reckon all *nixes in their out-of-the-box state would not be suitable for business uses. But with the right admin (not common or cheap), many *nixes will more than do.

Graham L
30-04-2005, 02:39 PM
Which CDs' should I download Vinref? I know that sometimes CD3 and CD4 are extra programs and packages that aren't needed for the core installation. But ltsp is probably one of those 'extras'


I wouldn't download whole CD images to get one package.:) I would "ltsp download" to Google and follow my nose.

Aurealis_
30-04-2005, 02:47 PM
I wouldn't download whole CD images to get one package.:) I would "ltsp download" to Google and follow my nose.

Not really familiar with the Linux environment Graham. I didn't even think it was possible to download it as a seperate package.

OF course, when I think about it, it's blazingly obvious that you can. Conceptually it is the same as downloading a new program, such as Firefox...

Sigh.

vinref
30-04-2005, 10:35 PM
This (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/4496901.stm) is why Ubuntu is so interested in LTSP. Good on them I say. Lots of hot air has been blown over IT for the third world masses, but the Ubuntu people are the only ones looking seriously into it. I really respect the folks there at Ubuntu.

vinref
08-05-2005, 02:57 AM
This is probably a quicker way of doing things - PXES Linux (http://pxes.sourceforge.net/).