PDA

View Full Version : Broadband off method.



Cicero
22-04-2005, 08:40 PM
Thanks to Rob99 I now have broadband.
Could someone say how best to turn it off.
That is,how best to leave it when not in use?.

Prescott
22-04-2005, 08:42 PM
i dont have broadband but would turning the router off work?

Cicero
22-04-2005, 08:50 PM
i dont have broadband but would turning the router off work?
I can turn it off Press,was wondering what the wizz kids do.
I have to look as if I know what I am doing. :)

Billy T
22-04-2005, 08:53 PM
Why would you want to turn it off? Provided you have adequate security there is no reason to turn it off except perhaps when you are finished with your computer for the day.

I turn my router off at the end of each day with a master switch that powers-down all peripherals. As well as saving power, this ensures that I start each day with a new IP address and freshly booted computers.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Cicero
22-04-2005, 09:14 PM
Why would you want to turn it off? Provided you have adequate security there is no reason to turn it off except perhaps when you are finished with your computer for the day.

I turn my router off at the end of each day with a master switch that powers-down all peripherals. As well as saving power, this ensures that I start each day with a new IP address and freshly booted computers.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)
You have me there B.
I have M/S fire wall and other sp2 stuff,adaware and spy bot.
All I seem to have is a modem adsl,and a computer,no sign of a router?

Metla
22-04-2005, 09:20 PM
You would turn it off because all traffic that gets as far as your router is charged against your usage,and not only is their all sorts of traffic bouncing around but if some script kiddie has decided to bombard your IP then hail mary,nice bill.

On the security side of things, It cant hurt, I tun off my router each night just the same as i remove the keys from my car each night even though its locked in a secure shed, I sure would stupid if it was stolen with the keys in it....


Anyhow, people running IE shouln't even touch the subject of security....

plod
22-04-2005, 09:30 PM
do the adsl modems have some sort of built in router?I'm cable which doesn't. curious

Cicero
22-04-2005, 09:32 PM
You would turn it off because all traffic that gets as far as your router is charged against your usage,and not only is their all sorts of traffic bouncing around but if some script kiddie has decided to bombard your IP then hail mary,nice bill.

On the security side of things, It cant hurt, I tun off my router each night just the same as i remove the keys from my car each night even though its locked in a secure shed, I sure would stupid if it was stolen with the keys in it....


Anyhow, people running IE shouln't even touch the subject of security....

Sorry but what is meant by router,is it the computer or the modem?

godfather
22-04-2005, 09:36 PM
You need to tell us what equipment you have (relative to the broadband connection, that is).

Is it an internal ADSL modem (the phone wire connects straight into the computer) or is there a device (modem or router) that connects to the phone line, and your computer connects to that?

Brand name and model of any external modem and router would help.

plod
22-04-2005, 09:37 PM
usually abox between the modem and computer, although some modems have built in routers.

Cicero
22-04-2005, 09:41 PM
You need to tell us what equipment you have (relative to the broadband connection, that is).

Is it an internal ADSL modem (the phone wire connects straight into the computer) or is there a device (modem or router) that connects to the phone line, and your computer connects to that?

Brand name and model of any external modem and router would help.
Right.
D-Link adsl external modem.Model No.DSL/302G.

Metla
22-04-2005, 09:48 PM
A modem dials up the internet,That doesn't relate to adsl/jetstream which is a constant feed.This constant feed is recieved by your router and fed into your comp. Even a single port device is a router and not a modem.

Though you can get routers without the ability to accept an adsl feed these aren't common in NZ.

I do believe the internal adsl device is called a modem for the sake of simplicity, Its not a modem by my definition,though wiser minds may be able to correct me on that.

godfather
22-04-2005, 09:59 PM
Looks like it is more an "external modem" than a true router perhaps. It apparently has no NAT firewalling or DHCP. But the definition of a router could encompass this device, as it can "route" info between two networks (your PC and the internet).

If you shut down your computer when not in use, it's a matter of personal choice as to turning the modem off or not. My external modem/router is never shut down, but the computers are.

tweak'e
22-04-2005, 11:08 PM
personally, any external adsl "modem" should be powered off when not in use. not only because of traffic being sent to it but there is always the risk of the"modem" itself being hacked while your away.

Cicero
22-04-2005, 11:08 PM
Looks like it is more an "external modem" than a true router perhaps. It apparently has no NAT firewalling or DHCP. But the definition of a router could encompass this device, as it can "route" info between two networks (your PC and the internet).

If you shut down your computer when not in use, it's a matter of personal choice as to turning the modem off or not. My external modem/router is never shut down, but the computers are.

I am only able to relay what is on the box and at no time does it mention router.
Contents,1 D-Link DSL-302G ADSL Modem.

So now I am in a quandary,have I got it right,Metla says disconnect Modem and G_F says no need to???

godfather
22-04-2005, 11:16 PM
Perhaps you could just turn it off v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y, meeting both conditions?

Just apply logic.
If it is turned off, it will not hurt it.
If you forget, it's unlikely (though as tweak'e says it's remotely possible) to be a problem.

Whichever way you want to do it, just write it on the fridge so you remember?

Cicero
22-04-2005, 11:27 PM
Perhaps you could just turn it off v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y, meeting both conditions?

Just apply logic.
If it is turned off, it will not hurt it.
If you forget, it's unlikely (though as tweak'e says it's remotely possible) to be a problem.

Whichever way you want to do it, just write it on the fridge so you remember?
You are always good for a laugh G_F,you can rest assured it will go on the fridge,memory being what it is.
But what I would like is a definitive answer on this occasion.For one thing there is no switch on the modem,so hard to turn off s-l-o-w-l-y or f-a-s-t-l-y,new word for you there.

Cicero
22-04-2005, 11:56 PM
Must be bed time for our knowledgeable ones. :)

Rob99
23-04-2005, 12:23 AM
Still working I see, thats great. :)

It is the install yourself kit from xtra model number mentioned above. The D-Link device does have modem written clearly on it, it is always on. ie. it does not dial up. I think the proper name for the device is a router. I dont think it has a NAT firewall and does have DHCP altho not setup that way.

You can leave it on all the time, the only way to turn it off is to unplug from the power(akward unless you leave it on your desk) or you could unplug the telephone line(just as akward unless you leave it on your desk).
You can also log into the D-Link and disconnect from the internet, but this is not just a few clicks.

Next time I go to Dads I will muck around with his to see if I can figure out an easy way, unless someone has any ideas.

You should not be too worried with the arsnel you have on-board to attack the nasties, if you get infected I'm sure you will gun them down in no time.

Metla
23-04-2005, 12:28 AM
right click connection>disable.

I strongly suggest to a few of my clients they do this,seeing as they constantly get spyware despite my best efforts.

I do wish they had got units with on/off switches.


edit.

Having said that,it only applies when you want to stop net activity while using the comp for other tasks.

Cicero
23-04-2005, 10:25 AM
Thank you chaps,will now proceed in an orderly manner.

Greg
23-04-2005, 10:46 AM
I do believe the internal adsl device is called a modem for the sake of simplicity, Its not a modem by my definition,though wiser minds may be able to correct me on that.

That's how I see it too:

Google says (http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=define%3A+modem&btnG=Google+Search&meta=)

Myth
23-04-2005, 10:58 AM
I do believe the internal adsl device is called a modem for the sake of simplicity, Its not a modem by my definition,though wiser minds may be able to correct me on that. As mentioned in the above Google... Modem (MOdulator/DEModulator) converts analog serial data to digital parallel data for computer in varying manners (external modem uses serial controller to convert; internal modem I believe uses onboard UART chip).
ADSL (Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line) transmits DIGITAL data

Cicero
23-04-2005, 11:19 AM
And the definition of a router....

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&rls=GGLC,GGLC:1970-01,GGLC:en&oi=defmore&q=define:Router

So I think mine is a modem?

theother1
23-04-2005, 11:23 AM
Why not just turn it off at the wall at the end of the day? :@@:

Myth
23-04-2005, 11:25 AM
Nope


From Google 'A hardware device that routes data from a local area network (LAN) to another network connection. A router is connected to at least two networks, commonly two LANs or WANs or a LAN and its ISP's network. Routers are located at gateways - the places where two or more networks connect.' Yours is a router

Why, because you are on ADSL; and modems (proper modems) deal with analog data. Also, your connection to the ISP is your gateway... your setup at home is a LAN network (even if it just a router and computer). You also connect to another network (the Internet) via your router (gateway).

drcspy
23-04-2005, 11:27 AM
i have a (usb) thompson (alcatel) speedtouch 330 which is the model xtra were giving out before they got to the d-link 302g's ........it's different in that it requires you to actually 'dial in' as such just like an ordinary modem......so that when one wants to disconnect it its just a right clik on the system tray icon and 'disconnect'.........very simple......sure it's usb but it's totally reliable and works perfectly for me......i'm quite willing to swap it for your d-link if you wish, (although I have one of those too already).........

Billy T
23-04-2005, 11:31 AM
Thank you chaps,will now proceed in an orderly manner.

One of the easiest ways to proceed in an orderly manner (whilst saving power) is to plug all peripherals that have an independent power feed into a multiway board, then you only need turn off one switch each night.

My system is built in because I installed it while building my office, but it has two 4-way outlet plates controlled by a master switch on the wall. It supplies my router, network switch, scanner, printers, external sound system, and camera chargers x2. Each of my computers is independently supplied via its own UPS.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

PaulD
23-04-2005, 11:40 AM
Nope

Yours is a router

Why, because you are on ADSL and modems (proper modems) deal with analog data.

How do you think the router transmits the data down the copper cable? The routers all have a modem section. In fact with DMT (Discrete Multi Tone) which is the NZ ADSL method you can think of it as a whole lot of modems in parallel.

R.M.
23-04-2005, 11:45 AM
I have the same "modem" - D-Link DSL-302G, and I turn the computer off, and as well unplug from the filter to the phone connection...

Myth
23-04-2005, 11:53 AM
In digital :illogical

Midavalo
23-04-2005, 12:06 PM
I had it explained to me that an ADSL router can be plugged into a LAN (via a hub or switch) and be accessable by all PCs plugged into that LAN. An ADSL modem is accessable only to the PCs it is directly connected to.

The DSL-302g will not work if plugged into a hub or switch - it only connects directly to a PC (via USB or ethernet). So I would call it a modem (as does d-link on the box the modem comes in ;))

Aside from that, it does have NAT firewalling built in, and it is quite effective. It also allows for port-forwarding and the like. This is the modem I had for a couple of months before I traded it in for a 4-port router.

It does not have an off switch, so I used to just unplug it when I turned the PC off at night - other than that it was on all day (used to get quite hot too... the new 4-port hardly even gets slightly warm :))

M.

Metla
23-04-2005, 12:15 PM
hmmm....how could a device such as the DSL-302g decide not to work if plugged into a switch,it merely recieves and passes on data,a switch,hub,router can then decide where that data stream is going....

Midavalo
23-04-2005, 12:23 PM
hmmm....how could a device such as the DSL-302g decide not to work if plugged into a switch,it merely recieves and passes on data,a switch,hub,router can then decide where that data stream is going....The connection was there, but it would not talk to the switch. The switch didn't even light up to tell me it was there. The switch work fine, and the modem worked fine... just didn't talk to each other. I've heard from different people that this is the difference between an ADSL router and an ADSL modem. The router will talk to a hub or switch, a modem will not. And my experience seems to confirm that.

M.

Greg
23-04-2005, 01:01 PM
My system is built in because I installed it while building my office, but it has two 4-way outlet plates controlled by a master switch on the wall. It supplies my router, network switch, scanner, printers, external sound system, and camera chargers x2. Each of my computers is independently supplied via its own UPS.


Yeah fine, easy for you, but you're an electrician type of guy, and I hate electricity almost more than I hate heights and spiders! Gimme a snake or crocodile anyday! :thumbs:

theother1
23-04-2005, 02:21 PM
.......................anyway, you didn't say that you had Anti Virus software or a firewall (other than the XP one). If you haven't you should and the free ones most here will recommend will be AVG Free www.grisoft.com and Zonealarm Free www.zonelabs.com get them you won't be disappointed.

Aurealis_
23-04-2005, 03:12 PM
My suggestion is to unpulg your ADSL device from your phone line. That way you are disconnected from the outside world/ADSL network but your internal network will stay intact.

With most modem/routers when you plug the phone line back in it will reconnect in about 10 seconds. Simplest and Cleanest way to maintain 'broadband off'

Cicero
23-04-2005, 05:11 PM
I will consider all your replies.
Am I right in saying there is some confusion out there as to what is a router and what is a modem?
Some say turn off some say not necessary.
I thought this a simple question for the lads.

Aurealis_
23-04-2005, 05:18 PM
My suggestion is to unpulg your ADSL device from your phone line. That way you are disconnected from the outside world/ADSL network but your internal network will stay intact.

With most modem/routers when you plug the phone line back in it will reconnect in about 10 seconds. Simplest and Cleanest way to maintain 'broadband off'

I stand by my response. Unplug the phone connection and no more ADSL signals can be received by you.

Cicero
23-04-2005, 05:22 PM
I stand by my response. Unplug the phone connection and no more ADSL signals can be received by you.
I am sure you do Aur.problem is so do the opposite views. :D

Billy T
23-04-2005, 10:09 PM
Yeah fine, easy for you, but you're an electrician type of guy, and I hate electricity almost more than I hate heights and spiders! Gimme a snake or crocodile anyday! :thumbs:

Yes Greg, electronics actually, but that is not the point. I explained the simple way to achieve the same outcome using a multiway board. Neither making allusions about, nor casting aspersions at present or any posters on PF1, any clot with half a brain can do this:


One of the easiest ways to proceed in an orderly manner (whilst saving power) is to plug all peripherals that have an independent power feed into a multiway board, then you only need turn off one switch each night.

Cheers

Billy 8-{) :D

Hmmm..... use a pull switch with a ring on the end, and the one ring can control them all! :p

Cicero
23-04-2005, 10:52 PM
Yes Greg, electronics actually, but that is not the point. I explained the simple way to achieve the same outcome using a multiway board. Neither making allusions about, nor casting aspersions at present or any posters on PF1, any clot with half a brain can do this:



Cheers

Billy 8-{) :D

Hmmm..... use a pull switch with a ring on the end, and the one ring can control them all! :p
Do you use one of those fancy anti spike jobs?

Billy T
24-04-2005, 12:35 AM
Nope, just unplug during thunderstorms.

Spike suppressors can't handle lightning anyway.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Rob99
24-04-2005, 01:14 AM
The d-link can be connected either USB or ethernet, this one is connected via ethernet to the computer, altho not tried I would guarantee it will work through a hub/switch.

Metla's suggestion of right click - disable would be what I would do if I was concerned about spyware getting onto the computer while doing other tasks uninternet related, this would disable the network card in the computer, thus not allowing traffic into it.

If you were as paranoid as some others about people hacking the d-link; changing settings, using your Mb allowance, it would have to be switched off or unplugged from the phone line. I would guess 90% of people just leave them on and dont worrie/know/care about it, I would be in the 90%ige.

Cicero
24-04-2005, 09:12 AM
Thanks chaps.
No paranoia emanating from this part of the world,just after the facts.

godfather
24-04-2005, 11:21 AM
Thanks chaps.
No paranoia emanating from this part of the world,just after the facts.

Again no "facts" exist, personal choice is the only issue.
There is no "right" or "wrong" way here, regarding disconnecting.

Same for the surge suppressor (spike suppressor) issue, they will not handle lightning well, as stated, but may be useful in your case for possible system disturbances as you are on a rural electricity network feeder, and subject to any switching or fault induced spikes that are slightly more prevalent in rural areas.
Again, it is purely a personal preference, weighing up the cost vs the possible benefit. Cheap surge suppressors are usually not worth considering.

dolby digital
24-04-2005, 11:28 AM
Thanks chaps.



I have a Dlink 302g MODEM (yes it is written on it). It is connected to a switch to allow many pc's to access the internet. Mine is a DHCP server. My understanding is that that it is also a router as it connects my LAN to a WAN and all WAN traffic is ROUTED via this device. I leave mine on all the time for better or for worse. It has a firewall so there is some protection. What you could do is log into the 302G and go to the Connection Status and click "Disconnect" so the 302G could be left on but the hackers cannot get access to your pc. I would suggest you turn the 302G off though. You then save a bit of power too. Its really up to you.

What starts as a simple question ends up as a debate on what is the RIGHT way of doing things.

BTW, I leave some of my pc's on (to do backups, virus scans etc). :blush:

tweak'e
24-04-2005, 11:31 AM
Metla's suggestion of right click - disable would be what I would do if I was concerned about spyware getting onto the computer

sorry its a liitle off topic but i've heard this once to often.

<rant>spyware don't get into your pc if its sitting idle on the net. no firewall can stop spyware getting INTO your pc. spyware/malware is DOWNLOADED BY USERS, even if they don't know they have done so. no firewall, turning net off, or other bull i've heard latly will stop a user downloading spyware. </rant>

dolby digital
24-04-2005, 11:36 AM
sorry its a liitle off topic but i've heard this once to often.

<rant>spyware don't get into your pc if its sitting idle on the net. no firewall can stop spyware getting INTO your pc. spyware/malware is DOWNLOADED BY USERS, even if they don't know they have done so. no firewall, turning net off, or other bull i've heard latly will stop a user downloading spyware. </rant>

<answer>Just keep off the internet. Go fishing or play golf</answer>

:D

Cicero
24-04-2005, 11:36 AM
I think I am getting the picture,we neophytes take a bit of time to take in the fact that we must rely on opinions as apposed to the facts that don't exist. ;)

Metla
24-04-2005, 11:56 AM
sorry its a liitle off topic but i've heard this once to often.

<rant>spyware don't get into your pc if its sitting idle on the net. no firewall can stop spyware getting INTO your pc. spyware/malware is DOWNLOADED BY USERS, even if they don't know they have done so. no firewall, turning net off, or other bull i've heard latly will stop a user downloading spyware. </rant>


uh...its to stop an infested computer (trojans,virus,spyware) making use of the net access. Trust me,some people can't be saved from their own actions,no matter how tight the machine is locked down when you leave, It only takes one person to install a p2p app and disable the firewall and its all full steam ahead once again....

Cicero
24-04-2005, 12:20 PM
Oh dear,which you hadn't mentioned that...
It only takes one person to install a p2p app and disable the firewall and its all full steam ahead once again....

Poppa John
24-04-2005, 12:34 PM
OUCH PJ
right click connection>disable.

I strongly suggest to a few of my clients they do this,seeing as they constantly get spyware despite my best efforts.

I do wish they had got units with on/off switches.


edit.

Having said that,it only applies when you want to stop net activity while using the comp for other tasks.

tweak'e
24-04-2005, 01:25 PM
uh...its to stop an infested computer (trojans,virus,spyware) making use of the net access.
exactly. and also its an easy way to tell if its infected BUT it won't STOP it being infected (with the exception of downloader trojens, a firewall can stop these from infecting your pc even more)

easiest way to hack a pc is to fool the user.

Greg
26-04-2005, 08:11 AM
It only takes one person to install a p2p app and disable the firewall and its all full steam ahead once again....

Or load anything from an unscanned floppy, CD or DVD disk