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vinref
28-02-2005, 02:56 PM
I am designing a 468 x 60 pixel web banner consisting of a graphic and the site name, using Gimp2.2. I have no access to other graphic design applications. I have little experience with designing graphics, but I am learning fast. However, there are some questions that I have and I hope someone reasonably familiar with designing can answer.

1. Can I produce the design on another template, say 1024 x 768 pixel, and re-scale it without loss of quality to fit a 468 x 60 pixel template?

2. What format should I design in? I am told to use a scaleable vector format so that I can modify and convert the graphic without loss of information. I use EPS.

3. From the conversions I have done from EPS to JPEG, GIF and PNG, it seems that there is very little between them in size and image quality. The graphic is very simple and consists of only two colours, but the files for the same graphic look rather big - JPEG is 8829 B, GIF is 8605 B, and the PNG is 8561 B. The source EPS file is 20266 B. Can they be compressed for use on a website?

Thanks in advance.

Murray P
28-02-2005, 03:44 PM
I am designing a 468 x 60 pixel web banner consisting of a graphic and the site name, using Gimp2.2. I have no access to other graphic design applications. I have little experience with designing graphics, but I am learning fast. However, there are some questions that I have and I hope someone reasonably familiar with designing can answer.

1. Can I produce the design on another template, say 1024 x 768 pixel, and re-scale it without loss of quality to fit a 468 x 60 pixel template?

2. What format should I design in? I am told to use a scaleable vector format so that I can modify and convert the graphic without loss of information. I use EPS.

3. From the conversions I have done from EPS to JPEG, GIF and PNG, it seems that there is very little between them in size and image quality. The graphic is very simple and consists of only two colours, but the files for the same graphic look rather big - JPEG is 8829 B, GIF is 8605 B, and the PNG is 8561 B. The source EPS file is 20266 B. Can they be compressed for use on a website?

Thanks in advance.

I've only used The Gimp a couple of times but my sone used it along with OO to make his first website. A little shoulder surfing to make sure he did it right http://pressf1.pcworld.co.nz/images/smilies/blush.gif gave me a bit more insight into the programmes capabilities.


1. Yes. Obviously fine detail, if any, will be harder to see.

2. I don't use it myself but if it's the default it's probably fine. Perhaps try PSD or any other comman design/editing format (I remeber coverting a file from PSD to EPS and it ballooned in size). They all tend to make large files but, this in part depends on the number undo and step back options which are stored in the file data so, 30 steps is going to create a larger file than 20 until you clear the cache and flatten the image once you are satisfied with the results (thus far).

2. I guess you know, those sizes are far far too big for a web page, try to keep it under 100KB. Have a play with the slider when you resize it to reduce quality. Also look at the PPI or DPI it's set at, it's not for printing so reduce to suit, <72 and, while your at it look at the colour bitrate.

FoxyMX
28-02-2005, 03:59 PM
The graphic is very simple and consists of only two colours, but the files for the same graphic look rather big - JPEG is 8829 B, GIF is 8605 B, and the PNG is 8561 B. The source EPS file is 20266 B. Can they be compressed for use on a website?
If you have listed those sizes correctly then the files are not very big at all and won't need compressing. 8829 B (Bytes) is acceptable but if it were 8829 KB then yes, they would definitely need to be compressed.

Murray P
28-02-2005, 04:10 PM
If you have listed those sizes correctly then the files are not very big at all and won't need compressing. 8829 B (Bytes) is acceptable but if it were 8829 KB then yes, they would definitely need to be compressed.

Ahh yes, missed that ta Foxy, assumed it was KB. If it's bytes vinref, ignore all my blather re resizing above.

Kame
28-02-2005, 04:53 PM
Vector-based formats such as EPS are commonly used on desktop publishing applications.

Even if your file is an imported JPEG picture, the desktop application actually converts it to EPS format as it allows resizing without distorting the picture, as it's not working with graphics, it's working with Post Script information, although the quality does come down to the accuracy of the nodes.

It would be the best method for distributing an image that may need to be resized, you'll see that a lot of software companies that ask you to display their logo use EPS file formatted pictures. e.g. PHP.net and MySQL.org

If there's only two colours being used, you could lessen it by using 4-8bit colours, so that it does not need to include all the other colour information, if it's not intending on using it. There are other ways to make it smaller, but you'll probably get better advice from the graphic designers found on my forum at http://astahost.com/index.php, who could help further and more specifically to graphic creating.

8KB isn't too bad for size though, but you might be able to shave another 2KB off it.


Kame