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mejobloggs
17-01-2005, 11:45 AM
Just some info to start:
Current PC
Disk Drive: ST340016A (40 GB, 7200 RPM, Ultra-ATA/100)
Motherboard: MSI KT3 Ultra-ARU (MS-6380E)

Now, I want to buy an old harddrive, around 4gb, because I have a 3gb partition that I want to move off my main drive.

I saw this website http://www.ptlcomputers.co.nz/ in a local newspaper, and they sell 'refurbished' computer stuff, and they said they have 4gb IDE hard drives for $20.

I said I wanted a 4gb ATA drive, because that is what my current one is, and they said that they only have IDE ones, and they don't know if it will work on my computer.

And, since I dont have a clue, im asking you guys if it would work.

Thanks!

godfather
17-01-2005, 11:47 AM
ATA (AT Attachment) and IDE (Integrated Device Electronics) are the same.

mejobloggs
17-01-2005, 11:49 AM
Cool, thanks! So do i just have to get an ATA cord or something?

drcspy
17-01-2005, 12:03 PM
with the exception of 'sata' drives, which are a little different in their method of connection, all IDE drives are ATA drives and are 'standardised'.......

Greg
17-01-2005, 12:41 PM
If my guess is right you want the second drive to hold backup data? That being the case wouldn't it be better to get the least expensive brand new drive for the job

drcspy
17-01-2005, 12:44 PM
yeh shop around a new 40gb hdd is only about $80 these days......

godfather
17-01-2005, 12:47 PM
Agree with the above, any 4GB HDD will be well past it's "use by" date now for any reliable storage.

Greg
17-01-2005, 01:12 PM
A bit off topic, but I'm curious about whether a second drive on primary slave or secondary slave or master, while not being accessed - does it actually spin?

I use a second drive to hold my backups, and rarely access it more than 1/2 an hour a day. Just wondering will it be subject to the same mechanical wear as my primary master?

John H
17-01-2005, 01:23 PM
A bit off topic, but I'm curious about whether a second drive on primary slave or secondary slave or master, while not being accessed - does it actually spin?

I use a second drive to hold my backups, and rarely access it more than 1/2 an hour a day. Just wondering will it be subject to the same mechanical wear as my primary master?

That is a good question and I will be interested in the answer! I have a spare drive that I put in an external USB case and only plug it in when I want to do a back up or drive image. I wonder if there is more wear and tear on an external drive that only gets cranked up every now and again, compared with one that lives in the case at working temperature like yours does.

Also, I keep my external drive in a lockable tin cupboard in the garage for security, and in the winter it is extremely cold when I take it out to use it. Maybe I should let it come up to room temperature like a good red wine before I use it...

godfather
17-01-2005, 01:42 PM
Unless you have your settings to turn off the drives after a set time of inactivity, then yes it will spin.

Graham L
17-01-2005, 01:52 PM
John: Extreme changes in temperature are probably not the worst thing; it's the moisture in the air which could give problems with condensation.

Drives are not hermetically sealed. They "breathe" through a small vent (and filter).

In the days of MFM drives, Byte magazine carried horror stories about computers left in a car overnight in winter, taken inside and powered up, with immediate disk crash. But that seems the wrong way around to me... The suggestion was made that a drive being brought inside should be kept in a ziplock bag, and left in it until it had come up to inside temperature. My feeling is that it would breath out as it warmed up.

Going the other way seems to me to be the risk. It's got warm air (which might hold a fair amount of water vapour). When it cools down, it will suck in cold (drier) air, but the moister air has probably condensed out some of its water (on the walls of the case, I hope;)) even before that happens.

It doesn't seem to be a much "reported" problem these days. MFM drives were pretty flakey anyway. :D They crashed on the slightest provocation. :(

An interesting question. I wonder what the answer is.:D

Of course, you are prudent to store the backup ina different building from the computer. Many computers have been stolen with their handy accessories. A backup disk is best not handy.

Murray P
17-01-2005, 02:22 PM
Unless the air is considerably more humid indoors than in the car, I don't see any reason to seal the whole lot up in a bag and, although the case and air within would warm before the space and metal within the HDD, of course things will equalise in time.

I would imagine that as the HDD cooled in the car it is possible for dew point to be reached, thus moisture condensing on the parts inside. Warming above dew point allows water vapour to be formed once more, the dew point being varied by the amount of moisture present. If the air is at or close to vapour saturation then perhaps it will have to be expelled in some way before it's safe to use, boiling the moisture out of the HDD would work nicely, eh :thumbs: but then you'd have to seal it to stop the moisture returning as it cooled and pressure dropped. :D

mejobloggs
17-01-2005, 04:41 PM
Nah, its not for backup, its just to hold a 3gb Windows XP program with a program that the company came to install, and doesn't give you any way to install it yourself.

I thought I could just stick that onto the 4gb drive, and just boot it up everytime I need it, which is about once a month. I have made a complete mess of the 40gb drive, so I want to format it and start again.



yeh shop around a new 40gb hdd is only about $80 these days......


The thing is, I don't really want to spend $20, I have no job, and my money seems to be falling through my pocket somehow :( Guess I will have to get a job then ay?

Thats why im only going for a 4gb drive.