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Ash M
02-01-2005, 03:00 PM
Hey,

I have a LAN connected to an 8 port hub in one room. I want to connect two computers in another adjacent room to this LAN - (I want it hard wired for bandwidth reasons, rather than using Wireless).

One question regarding this:

1) I'm going to get an electrician to do it anyway, but I take it the RJ45 plate would just be like a connector, so I could plug UTP cable in one end into the computer the and another cable coming out the other side into a hub?

Cheers,

Ash

ninja
02-01-2005, 03:09 PM
Yup sounds about right.

Though make sure it's someone that actually knows how to wire Cat5 correctly.

That or you could just poke a normal cable through the wall yourself?

Or buy a long cable and run it round the skirting board to the next room - electrician kinda seems overkill.

pheonix
02-01-2005, 03:28 PM
Normally, you would end up with a wall-plate socket in each room. A male-male lead would then be required to go from the wallplate socket to the computer/hub/switch in each room.
You can get adaptors for each end that enable you to use the one outlet for two connections. Or two cable runs and double outlet plates at each end.
My inclination is, if possible, to run the cables under the house and get a cabler ( be it electrician or other) to fit the plugs on each end.

Ash M
02-01-2005, 03:36 PM
Normally, you would end up with a wall-plate socket in each room. A male-male lead would then be required to go from the wallplate socket to the computer/hub/switch in each room.
You can get adaptors for each end that enable you to use the one outlet for two connections. Or two cable runs and double outlet plates at each end.
My inclination is, if possible, to run the cables under the house and get a cabler ( be it electrician or other) to fit the plugs on each end.

What do you mean by a male-male lead... I take it regular cat 5 that you would buy pre-assembled, from say Dick Smiths would be considered Cat5?

pheonix
02-01-2005, 05:10 PM
Also known as Patch lead, straight through lead. Just the normal CAT5 with RJ45 plugs on each end. Same as goes from computer to switch/hub.

HadO
02-01-2005, 05:20 PM
I think DSE only stocks Cat6 now but same diff :)

bRaZZiN
02-01-2005, 05:59 PM
Oh yeah make sure you don't run the cat5 cable too close to power cables. 50Hz interference, premature attenuation, blah blah, etc

i-gordon
02-01-2005, 08:14 PM
Not many electricians have the necessary tool to fit Cat 5 plugs to the cable.
Why not buy a ready made Cat5 cable from Dick Smith, they come in various lengths and not anywhere near as expensive as one installed on site. Cut or bore a hole through the wall or floor in a place that wont be noticable just big enough to get the Cat5 plug through. Heres a tip to get the cable through. When you have the hole in the wall in one side work a sharp spike like a knitting needle through the hole to the wall on the other side so the holes line up then enlarge the hole on the other side for the Cat5 plug and feed it through. Im assuming that your walls are Gib Board so make sure that you are not going through a stud.

Metla
02-01-2005, 08:55 PM
Personally i would just pull up a section of carpet and drill a hole through the floor.

Having said that, I went wireless.....

ninja
02-01-2005, 09:11 PM
Personally i would just pull up a section of carpet and drill a hole through the floor.

Good call - excellent choice for those in houses with wooden floors. May prove marginally more difficult for those on a concrete slab.

agent
02-01-2005, 09:21 PM
I think DSE only stocks Cat6 now but same diff :)


What?! I'm positive I read somewhere that Cat5e is more future-proof than Cat6, and it's put me off Cat6. So why would DSE do such an evil thing? :confused:

Sb0h
02-01-2005, 09:25 PM
Personally i would just pull up a section of carpet and drill a hole through the floor

Exactly what I did in my office. Bought a 25m cable and ran it under the floor with the two ends poking up at the appropriate places. Works a treat and you can't see the cable under the desk either. Of course you could do the same thing running the cable up the corner of the room and through the ceiling if you have concrete floors. If you are going to lift carpet then factor in the cost of a tradesman to refit it, not really a job you can do yourself very easily.

tedheath
02-01-2005, 09:50 PM
If you do have a concrete floor or a low floor go for the ceiling route and drill down through the joists (long drill, I welded a drill on a rod).

TedHEATH

Jester
02-01-2005, 11:15 PM
Even if the rooms aren't next to each other and you have wardrobes then either go thru the wall between the wardrobes or up through ceiling in one wardrobe, along to next wardrobe, and back down. You can tidily route the cable down the inside of the wardrobe and lift the carpet from the smoothedge (if any) and run from there to location of PC in the room.

:D

Graham L
04-01-2005, 02:33 PM
Not many electricians have the necessary tool to fit Cat 5 plugs to the cable.

But most will have the IDP tool to connect the (solid conductor) fixed CATX cable to the sockets on wall plates. It's a standard Krone 110 tool. (Some of the sockets come with retainer caps which can be used to make the installation ...I prefer to use the tool.:D)

It's not worth paying someone to make up patch cables. There are two styles of RJ45 plugs --- the internals are different for solid conductor and stranded cables. Using the wrong ones will make for unreliable cables.

Just make sure the electrician knows data cabling ... the cable is twisted pair, and must be used as pairs. The pin numbering for the pairs is not intuitive (to some people). The pairs use pins: 1&2, 3&6, 4&5, 7&8.

Alan Cotrell
04-01-2005, 03:00 PM
Hello Ash,

Have a look at DSE catalogue number XH6839 or XH6774 using these products you can setup your network with no need to drill through walls or ceilings etc.

just plug each device into a standard powerpoint and network as normal, it works very well and makes it easy to move your network anywhere you desire (as long as you have access to a power point)

current price $156.00 for two ($78.00 each) probably cheaper than paying an electrician for running a cable etc.

Regards

AC

pheonix
04-01-2005, 04:02 PM
Good idea Alan, apart from the first posting that mentions he wants the cabling due to bandwidth requirements. RF can go to 50Mb/s, your suggested mains connections go to 14Mb/s, whereas the cat5e cable can go to 100Mb/s easily.
And Agent, the CAT6 is rated up to 1Gb/s, so that makes it better, not worse. Damn confusing I know.