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View Full Version : What should I learn to be an IT?



mister harbies
16-12-2004, 05:48 PM
Hi fellow F1ers,

I am looking at doing some home study next year, wanting to learn more about becoming an IT and what I should learn.

Should I learn PHP now? Or do ASP.Net. Or should I learn .Net before I do ASP? Java2 or C++?

I would like to know your thoughts on what I should learn first and aim to learn later when I am more experienced.

Also if there are other languages or stuff I have not mentioned but would be worthwhile to learn, please comment too.

Thanks,

Dannz
16-12-2004, 05:51 PM
I guess u mean doing something to do with it


hopefully becoming an IT
Oops Excuse the pun (Kind of)

Chilling_Silence
16-12-2004, 05:55 PM
The question is - Where in IT would you like to go?

Not much point learning a language if you dont ever seeing yourself programming.... Why become MCSE if you're going to support Unix boxes... Why get CCNA if you're going to be a Web Developer in PHP or ASP etc?!

ILikeLinux
16-12-2004, 05:56 PM
An IT?
As i understand IT, it means Information Technology.
I dont think you learn to be that. :p

Good luck though ;)

mister harbies
16-12-2004, 06:02 PM
Okay,

I can see myself in the future repairing computers, mainly microsoft and linux. Also setting up corporate networks, and creating custom applications for businesses.

I don't expect to create software like Photoshop or XP, but applications that would be useful for computers on a network like scheduling software etc.

Doing computer repair would be expected for all IT Technicians, so should learn something there.

the highlander
16-12-2004, 06:36 PM
Whats your present level of technical expertise ?

robsonde
16-12-2004, 06:40 PM
I would look at doing an A+ course and learning a scripting laungauge like perl.

b1naryb0y
16-12-2004, 07:12 PM
Start approaching companies asking them for work experience. You will learn more this way and you will get a "feel" for what area you want to specialise in.

Ash M
16-12-2004, 07:16 PM
I'd start basic (eg A+ (not that thats all that basic), and then once you've got a good idea of what you want to do then move on up
:)

ninja
16-12-2004, 07:27 PM
I would look at doing an A+ course and learning a scripting laungauge like perl.
No to the A+, yes to the perl.

Everyone and their Mum has an A+ cert, none of the employers I've worked for have paid them any value.

~sy~
16-12-2004, 07:45 PM
What area of IT? Repairing computers, etc. aint gonna earn you too much :o

I'd just recommend the A+/ and or MCSE to start with.

Metla
16-12-2004, 07:48 PM
No to the A+, yes to the perl.

Everyone and their Mum has an A+ cert, none of the employers I've worked for have paid them any value.

Education as to start somewhere,and and the areas covered by the A+ exams are the best possible starting point,irrilivent if it alone will or will not get someone a job.

Just a pity that the exams themselves are so...uh....utter bollucks

R2x1
16-12-2004, 07:56 PM
If you are sure you really want to be an "IT", get a job where there is lots of hard radiation, and stay close to the source. Mechanical qualification hurts a lot

~sy~
16-12-2004, 08:44 PM
It is somewhat important for IT people to have a good foundation of knowledge. Once you get the basics sorted, everything else should be a breeze

Good luck, ;)

noone
16-12-2004, 10:17 PM
im doing A + and im only 15 , if you do it get the A + all in one guide - thats the best book i have come across it. Its not that hard all you have to do is take time to understand - put it in different contexts etc. Hopefully i can sit it by the end of the holidays. C ++ is like the english of programming languages so i would go for that

mister harbies
16-12-2004, 10:20 PM
Hey,

Thanks for the reply guys!

A+ and Perl are things to look at and I should also see what MSCE can do for me.

Im looking at being in IT as a career; and my level of expertise is no better than being able to do html, basic javascript, dos and basic unix.


Thanks again

noone
16-12-2004, 10:23 PM
A + is mostly hardware and mixing that with a programming language could make you a "jack of all trades and master of one" as their are many sectors of the IT sector maybe it would be a better idea to choose one area and focus on that - IMO anyway

Chilling_Silence
17-12-2004, 01:56 AM
Learn to program .NET, as its the future of programming for Microsoft Software!

Marlboro
17-12-2004, 08:59 AM
I would also recommend studying the .NET framework. We have Visual Studio .NET 2003 at work, at i'm finding it great.

It really depends on what kind of job you are after - even something like VBA for Excel or MS SQL Server would be an advantage from an employers point of view.

On the database side I would recommend studying a basic course on Transact SQL or Enterprise Manager.

:)

MartynC
17-12-2004, 09:39 AM
I would also recommend prehaps, a broader skill base, eg do Accounting, that way you could advertise with both skill sets for IT work, & ppl may be happier with the accounting knowledge as well :confused:

~sy~
17-12-2004, 08:14 PM
I would also recommend prehaps, a broader skill base, eg do Accounting, that way you could advertise with both skill sets for IT work, & ppl may be happier with the accounting knowledge as well :confused:

IT in the business world seems to be working very well lately. Any medium+ firm will have their own servers and IT admin's etc. Good money to be made too! :D

southern_jas
18-12-2004, 05:31 PM
I agree with Ninja's comment regarding A+. I have just completed a B.Info.Tech degree and most major training institutions I have spoken to over the last three years have steered me away from the A+ and Network+ courses. I also have not found any prospective employers who consider A+ as something worth having.

If you are looking at following the networking path I would suggest you look at the Cisco qualifications as they seem to be well regarded by most people in the industry that I have spoken to.

I also agree on the comment regarding a scripting language. PERL is a very good multi-platform language and I have found it very simple to use despite being very powerful.
:nerd:

noone
18-12-2004, 05:33 PM
what about down the hardware path ?

Growly
18-12-2004, 08:30 PM
Everyone and their Mum has an A+ cert, none of the employers I've worked for have paid them any value.

Who you think has one aside, an A+ certification legally allows you to operate on PCs without voiding warranty immediately. The A+ certification is a good place to start because it isn't impossible and is quite broad. Granted, there are stupid finicky things that, when I studied it a couple of years ago, no one cared about (i.e. memory address of VGA in old IBM systems).

My courses were after school at a local polytech, and covered everything needed. I never sat the actual test though, wasn't grown up enough to take the plunge I guess (I'm an inside little boy).

Infact, I used the same book back then as sy suggested - the All in one guide (written by Mike Meyers (not Austin)). It comprehensive and even has a couple of practise exams.

But as the others said it does very much depend on where in the industry you want to go. I was so interested in networking that I took the Network+ course and got the certification earlier this year (after which I was promptly put down by everyone I told), and then did a more complex course on switching and routing - in order to sit the Allied Telesyn exams and the Cisco ones too.

Then I was distracted by a summer accelerator C++ course, which whet my appetite for programming. Completely different paths, of which I have no idea which to take. (Maybe both.) I intend to get CCIE within good time also...
and then there's uni.

Well, there's my life story, your turn...

noone
18-12-2004, 10:04 PM
with the all in one guide , is the fifth edition the latest one , im going to sit the exam by the end of the holidays but at the moment i only have the third edition , so i think i should get the new one

Tux
18-12-2004, 10:43 PM
all i can say, is that by your age and the knowledge you say you have, i doubt you would make it in IT, if you realy had to ask what quals you should get then you really have no idea what you are talking about. it is a very cut throat business now days as profit margins diminish and the market becomes saturated

noone
18-12-2004, 10:46 PM
who are you referring to tux ?

Tux
18-12-2004, 10:53 PM
very first poster

Metla
18-12-2004, 10:59 PM
Be interesting to know your age Tux, Something of a child i would guess, The age of the thread starter has nothing to do with his ability or drive.

And going by his profile he is barely out of his teens..... :rolleyes:

alphazulusixeightniner
18-12-2004, 11:11 PM
:rolleyes:

Growly
18-12-2004, 11:15 PM
Telling people they can't do something because of their age is bad taste - didn't the media make a big hoo haa about that women who graduated from university in her 60s/70s/120s ??

I thought that'd be a lesson to all you haters out there!

Besides, it's be truly horrible if we all started getting qualified aged 4.

whetu
18-12-2004, 11:21 PM
Be interesting to know your age Tux, Something of a child i would guess, The age of the thread starter has nothing to do with his ability or drive.
Well put


And going by his profile he is barely out of his teens..... :rolleyes:
By my count he's 25.. fairly out of his teens ;)

To answer the original question - do the first year of the BIT course, this was once upon a time referred to as CBC. It is a fairly broad and fairly easy year of study, and you touch on the major parts of corporate IT. You can then narrow down your speciality. And depending on who the education provider is that you go to, you should come out of it with A+, Network+ and a few other qualifications.

There was also an earlier mention of approaching IT companies - extremely good advice. For many people, the entry point in IT is helldesk, and any IT employer worth their teeth will pay more attention to your experience than your qualifications. My employer for example wont let you breathe in the direction of our datacentres unless you have 2 years min. server experience.

If you can survive a year or three on helldesk, then you'll survive in IT. Your time on the desk will make or break you.

When I was at polytech, I found it quite amusing the amount of people who genuinely believed they were going to graduate and then walk into a 6-digit salary. Sorry folks, there is good money to be made in IT, but it's not that good. If your main reason for getting into IT is money, you should perhaps consider another profession - one that you'll be happy doing day in and day out, because the IT industry is unfortunately saturated with thousands of people who are just in it for the money.

Spout
18-12-2004, 11:24 PM
what about down the hardware path ?Hardware, generally, will not pay much. Any trained monkey can put a computer together these days, it's simply a matter of matching componants. It's the IT equivalent of a mechanic as opposed to an engineer - a good engineer will earn far more than a good mechanic... generally.

Data work is good, IMHO. With skills like SQL and Crystal the world's your pipi!

That's my http://www.pressf1.co.nz/images/smilies/2cents.gif

Growly
18-12-2004, 11:43 PM
To answer the original question - do the first year of the BIT course, this was once upon a time referred to as CBC. It is a fairly broad and fairly easy year of study, and you touch on the major parts of corporate IT. You can then narrow down your speciality. And depending on who the education provider is that you go to, you should come out of it with A+, Network+ and a few other qualifications.

Weird - I always thought that CBC was level 4, and yet I did the hardware and o/s courses (for A+) at level 5, and the Network+ course at level 6 - have I been lied to?

Well back to me now, I don't intend to work at a helpdesk - ever ever ever ever. I figured that my job at school (assisstant tech, the hands on stuff I never wanted to do, from laying cables and crawling under building to implementing linux routers to touching expensive servers) will give me enough work experience by the time I leave university to not have to.

whetu
19-12-2004, 07:00 AM
Weird - I always thought that CBC was level 4, and yet I did the hardware and o/s courses (for A+) at level 5, and the Network+ course at level 6 - have I been lied to?

You have been lied to. CBC/BIT-1 is primarily level 5 with a few level 6 papers thrown in for fun. For level 4 you're looking more at the likes of ICDL, though ICDL tends to be a bit of level 1, 2, 3 and 4.

While on the subject of courses, right now the smart learning is in linux - it's a specialised knowledge, and so you can negotiate a higher pay. Weltec has a paper where you walk out with essentially LPI1, LPI2, Linux+ and most of RHCE. It's not a bad 600 bucks spent if you ask me.

Slightly off topic, did anyone else see the thread title and immediately think it was about transgender issues? *carefully worded* ;)

Growly
19-12-2004, 09:39 AM
You have been lied to. CBC/BIT-1 is primarily level 5 with a few level 6 papers thrown in for fun. For level 4 you're looking more at the likes of ICDL, though ICDL tends to be a bit of level 1, 2, 3 and 4

:O Oh dear! Well I'll just keep the level 6 credits they gave me and move on with my life...


While on the subject of courses, right now the smart learning is in linux - it's a specialised knowledge, and so you can negotiate a higher pay. Weltec has a paper where you walk out with essentially LPI1, LPI2, Linux+ and most of RHCE. It's not a bad 600 bucks spent if you ask me.

Funny you should say that, someone was saying that linux certifications are in their infancy at the moment and perhaps not the best choice - then again I've been lied to alot recently. Was looking at a course for next year - maybe linux... or MCSE... or I can just finish A+ (once again if you don't have it, get it, and furthermore perpetuate the endless cycle of degrading comments aimed at it) - or get CCNA - or just aim for finishing school - or not.

:s Well this thread was never about me (although I would have liked it to be), so we can all carry on now...


Slightly off topic, did anyone else see the thread title and immediately think it was about transgender issues? *carefully worded*

Erm - no, but I did spend a few moments trying to figure out what it meant - but now that you mention it, BAHAHAHAHA!

mister harbies
19-12-2004, 12:15 PM
all i can say, is that by your age and the knowledge you say you have, i doubt you would make it in IT, if you realy had to ask what quals you should get then you really have no idea what you are talking about. it is a very cut throat business now days as profit margins diminish and the market becomes saturated
Tux,

Im 25, intending to quit my job of three years. In my last job, I did many jobs that an IT technician could have done. I don't have any qualifications, but my boss trusted me, occassionally I would fail the job, and call the technician. It turns out that the technician is dumbfounded too.

What I am saying is that, I don't have qualifications, I don't know what I am messing around with, but I do occassionally (or often) get it done with success. But I need something on paper to prove that I know what I am messing around with.

Everyone starts somewhere. When you were born you knew nothing about computers. I know more about computers than you did when you were born, so don't pick on me saying that I don't know what I am talking about.

And besides this thread could be useful for others too!

mister harbies
19-12-2004, 12:20 PM
Slightly off topic, did anyone else see the thread title and immediately think it was about transgender issues? *carefully worded* ;)
LOL Whetu,

Nothing to do about NOT becoming a he or she, but becoming IT.

The title should have said IT Technician

:p

whetu
19-12-2004, 04:13 PM
Funny you should say that, someone was saying that linux certifications are in their infancy at the moment and perhaps not the best choice - then again I've been lied to alot recently. Was looking at a course for next year - maybe linux... or MCSE... or I can just finish A+ (once again if you don't have it, get it, and furthermore perpetuate the endless cycle of degrading comments aimed at it) - or get CCNA - or just aim for finishing school - or not.

Finish school and get that out of your hair, you've got plenty of time to continue with qualifications (and trust me, you WANT to get school out of the way ;) ) Right now an RHCE would be more valuable than an MCSE IMHO - MCSE was once upon a time a very valuable qualification, but now it's almost a token qualification.

The downside with qualifications like RHCE, MCSE and CCNA is they're all vendor specific. That's where neutral qualifications like the + series and the LPI's come in handy - they balance your qualset and give you a broader knowledgebase

Growly
19-12-2004, 04:15 PM
I have been enlightened once more by the ever wise whetu, thank you very much :D