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Mike
08-12-2004, 08:10 PM
A guy at work showed me this today...

http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/popmec54.jpg]Popular Mechanics 1954[/url] :D

Mike.

Jen C
08-12-2004, 09:21 PM
:D

Yeah, but you see they have a built-in steering wheel for those rally games! :p

Billy T
08-12-2004, 09:21 PM
It's a fake Mike.

Google it and you will get the history.

Cheers

Billy 8-{)

Terry Porritt
08-12-2004, 09:22 PM
The concentric steering wheels are great! Manual IRQ steering?

Though even at the time Popular Mechanics was a bit over the top with those sorts of articles, and no-one took them seriously, at least not anyone with a bit of science under their belt. Just compare the UK Wireless World of the time with Popular Mechanics, and you'd see what I mean.

Just 2 years after that article we were building quite a state of the art analogue computer at Joseph Lucas with peripherals like a high speed pen plotter and projection oscilloscope, and 'wireless' link to the factory fuel system test cells.

Billy T
08-12-2004, 09:23 PM
Take a look here (http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/hoaxes/computer.asp)

Terry Porritt
08-12-2004, 09:29 PM
Now you've gone and spoilt it Billy!

Mike
08-12-2004, 09:35 PM
> Now you've gone and spoilt it Billy!

It was nice while it lasted ;)

Mike.

E|im
08-12-2004, 09:57 PM
Gotta be quick... I think I saw this posted a few weeks ago.

Growly
08-12-2004, 10:11 PM
Bwahahahahah!!!!

Even more bwahahahahaha at the reality of it!!!

TonyF
08-12-2004, 10:46 PM
Just compare the UK
> Wireless World of the time with Popular Mechanics,
> and you'd see what I mean.
Now now Terry - don't you growl at WW .. It was my good reading for years and years ( esp Letters to Editor) and EW is still good reading. Splendid recent series from Graham Maynard on amp design ..

Cheers TonyF

Terry Porritt
09-12-2004, 12:03 PM
A classic case of forum misunderstanding Tony :)

I meant how down to earth and good WW was in comparison with pop magazines like Popular Mechanics.

The latter catered for incredulous Americans who would believe anything.

Wireless World was one of the best all round electronics magazines, (as distinct from a 'journal' )

Around that time there were articles about anaologue computers, which were probably the first practical computer that could be constructed at home to carry out simulation problems.

Then there were those articles by the contributors like 'Henry', 'Cathode Ray', and 'Free Grid'.

The good old days :)

R2x1
09-12-2004, 12:14 PM
>Just 2 years after that article we were building quite a state of the art analogue
>computer at Joseph Lucas with peripherals like a high speed pen plotter and
>projection oscilloscope, and 'wireless' link to the factory fuel system test cells.

If it's anything like their attempts at automotive electrical systems, I expect it is not quite working yet.
Is there any truth to the story that the English custom of drinking warm beer is entirely due to Lucas 'fridges?
;)
R2

Terry Porritt
09-12-2004, 12:22 PM
Ah, but the Lucas division I'm talking about was the Gas Turbine Equipment Ltd, the worlds leading manufacturer then of gas turbine engine fuel systems. So good that the American Bendix Corporation licensed the rights to manufacture.
The majority of the worlds jet planes flew on Lucas systems :D

Terry Porritt
09-12-2004, 12:25 PM
Fridges??

Never heard that one, but I expect warm beer goes way back :)

We did go into making heat pumps for a while.

Graham L
09-12-2004, 01:14 PM
And EW/WW is still publishing articles by Ivor Catt from time to time. :D

What amused me most about Popular Mechanics and Popular Science was their frequent cover stories about how every American would have his flying car, and would just drive out of the garage,taking off on the street outside. Since car drivers crash when they have only two dimensions to work in, the carnage in three dimensions would be immense.

Perhaps Al Queda should put a flying car in every American garage. ]:)

Terry Porritt
09-12-2004, 02:11 PM
I seem to remember Ivor Catt trying to re-write the laws of physics, particularly Maxwells equations, and I think relativity too.

Graham L
09-12-2004, 02:35 PM
The relativity guy was called Dingle, I think ... I read a book about EPR, Bell's theorem, and quantum entanglement last night. It's a good thing no-one understands quantum theory. :D

Winston001
09-12-2004, 02:54 PM
Not so much a lack of understanding the theory Graham, rather why and how quantum effects exist at all. The Quantum theories are fine - but they are at best models/guesses at subatomic behaviours. You see it all goes back to photon decoupling in the first 300 years of the Universe....................or so the theory goes. ;)

TonyF
09-12-2004, 02:56 PM
> I seem to remember Ivor Catt trying to re-write the
> laws of physics, particularly Maxwells equations, and
> I think relativity too.

Ivor has been in full cry in recent issues of EW!!

Terry Porritt
09-12-2004, 03:40 PM
I haven't seen EW on sale in Upper Hutt , not for years and years.

TonyF
09-12-2004, 03:44 PM
> I haven't seen EW on sale in Upper Hutt , not for
> years and years.
Maybe it is hidden among all those adult "sealed-in-plastic" mags ...

Elephant
09-12-2004, 09:18 PM
Just thought I would add this from Langalist wich I received today.

Sorry I could not give a link as this was posted to a newsletter site.

Don't read further if you don't want to.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Last issue, we ran a piece about a visual hoax involving a doctored photo of a submarine control panel that was being passed off as a 1950's vision of the home PC of the future. ( http://langa.com/newsletters/2004/2004-12-06.htm#10 ) We also ran a link to the anti-hoax site, Snopes.Com, which thoroughly refuted the hoax.

Here's one step better: A LangaList read who worked at just that kind of control panel:

Fred, Just had to comment on the Just for Grins section of the December 06, 2004 edition of your newsletter.

The "huge bank of switches and levers and a large-diameter metal steering wheel of some kind" is actually the set of control panels from the maneuvering room of a nuclear submarine that was built in the 1960's. The specific panel in the photo is from USS James K Polk, SSBN 645, and is on display in the Smithsonian Institute Museum in Washington, DC. The Polk was a missile submarine virtually identical to one in which I operated the nuclear reactor in the early 1970's. My boat was USS Kamehameha, SSBN-642.

If you look carefully at the photo you will see that there are three separate panels: On the left is the steam plant control panel. The wheels operated large throttle valves which admitted steam to the propulsion turbines in the engine room. Opening the valves attached to the large wheel made the ship go forward. The small wheel is for reverse. The watchstander at this panel was called the throttleman. In the center is the reactor plant control panel from which systems directly related to the nuclear reactor (pumps, valves, control rods, pressurization system, nuclear instrumentation, etc.) were operated. This is where I spent most of my time. Finally, the panel on the right is the electric plant control panel from which the turbine generators, motor-generators, ship's battery, and diesel generator were controlled.

I find it amusing that someone would describe these panels as part of a computer because there is utterly nothing digital about them. Everything was 100% analog.

A long time Plus subscriber, Phil Steen

Thanks, Phil!

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cut and pasted without editing.

Elephant
09-12-2004, 09:24 PM
> A guy at work showed me this today...
>
> http://sal.neoburn.net/imagef1/files/popmec54.jpg]Popu
> ar Mechanics 1954[/url] :D
>
> Mike.

Popular Mechanics was in fact very popular.

I still have a crossbow that my Dad and I made using a car spring some wood ( Oak ) and a few other bits. The diagram and instructions came from that magazine.

Thomas
09-12-2004, 10:43 PM
You got me thinking there 00 and the following always interested me.


It seems that computers use transistors in their operation, the information can be represented and manipulated via switches. An early illustration of this idea is the Morse code - letters and numbers are represented by a particular series of dots and dashes. In computers dots and dashes aren't used, but rather electrical signals, but the idea is the same - certain sequences represent particular letters and numbers. For example, to represent the numbers we might use the following sequence of signals: and so on.

Winston001
10-12-2004, 11:39 AM
That's certainly quite a leap Tom. From 1950s Popular Mechanics (and a rather amusing hoax), through quantum theory, to Morse Code in our computers. You've set my whole day up. ;) How can I concentrate on my work now? :D

Prescott
10-12-2004, 01:17 PM
it's just like that nike one, how you send in your old nike shoes and they send you a new pair

Winston001
10-12-2004, 02:07 PM
Really? Do you think they'd take some Redbands?

Thomas
10-12-2004, 05:27 PM
>>>Do you think they'd take some Redbands?


Only if you do the coast to coast in them?;)

Misty
10-12-2004, 05:33 PM
Talking about old predictions - I recall one famous one from one of the very original founders of IBM that the world would only ever need five computers ! :O

Somebody on the forum will recall the detail better I am sure. I cannot think how you would do a search to find out who it was ? ?:|

Misty :D

Mike
10-12-2004, 05:41 PM
> Talking about old predictions - I recall one famous
> one from one of the very original founders of IBM
> that the world would only ever need five computers !
> :O

You mean Thomas Watson - according to Wikipedia the quote has been attributed to him, but no proof that he actually said it has been found.

Mike.