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View Full Version : Axper Brand Mobos anyone tried one ?



the highlander
23-09-2004, 03:05 PM
When I make up budget systems for friends/family I usually use asrock mobos They are not spectacular performers but I have only had one dud one out of 20 odd and they are reliable and stonkingly cheap.
Any one know anything about axper mobos ? anyone tried one ?
New company from Taiwan wonder if they have a relationship similar to asrock /asus with some other company.
Anyway seriously cheap boards, even cheaper than asrock.

metla
23-09-2004, 03:12 PM
Gigabyte Technology is reportedly ready to unveil its own mainboards aimed at the market where only the pricing matters. In spite of earlier information, the brand-name for the parts will be Axper, not Gigatrend.

the highlander
23-09-2004, 03:17 PM
Jeez Metla, are you hardwired into F1 ? :-)

Cheers for that though, didn't think any new companies would have the balls or capital to start up in the mobo business

metla
23-09-2004, 03:21 PM
Doing paperwork(well entering data into a spreadsheet) and have a window open displaying the forum......and damn me if entering data isn't the most boring job i ever have to do.....my attention wanders constantly,in fact i haven't done any work for over an hour......

And a google for Axper parent company bought up the info instantly.

Pete O\'Neil
23-09-2004, 03:27 PM
Why dont you just use Gigabyte boards, they're relatively cheap and have heaps of features for the price. Soltek are pretty cheap aswell, some of their boards have an awsome reputations, and some have a really bad repuation.

Then theres always great boards like PCChips and ECS ;\

metla
23-09-2004, 03:37 PM
I would put an ECS Nforce2 board up against any other brand of Nforce2 any day of the week.

The ECS KM400-M2 is also a fast stable fully featured micro board,that spanks the daylights out of Simerley priced ASrock boards.

Can't say i would use an ECS board on a P4 but the above boards are good stock.

And its always a good idea to keep an idea of what models are up there with the other brands and which are under-performers.

ECS have in the past had some very sub-standerd boards on the market,but also some top performers at an excellent price.

Pete O\'Neil
23-09-2004, 03:43 PM
> Doing paperwork(well entering data into a
> spreadsheet) and have a window open displaying the
> forum......and damn me if entering data isn't the
> most boring job i ever have to do.....my attention
> wanders constantly,in fact i haven't done any work
> for over an hour......
>
> And a google for Axper parent company bought up the
> info instantly.
Perhaps you could do what you did with the desk and offer a small child a IDE cable if they'll do you paperwork for you? Might have to up the incentive a lil bit though, perhaps a rounded IDE cable.

the highlander
23-09-2004, 04:00 PM
Why dont you just use Gigabyte boards ?

Well I do but they aren't always available at the price that asrocks areplus the earlier asrocks didn't require P4 power supply for pentium mobos.
But then come to think of it i haven't bought an asrock for about two months.
Last couple have been asus and gigabyte and I wasn't that fussed about the gigabyte fxm board which had the mobo temp reading higher than the cpu.

Pete O\'Neil
23-09-2004, 04:03 PM
>the earlier asrocks didn't require P4 power supply for pentium mobos.
Wouldnt that be a bad thing? The extra plug on the motherboard is there for a reason.

PaulD
23-09-2004, 04:06 PM
"I would put an ECS Nforce2 board up against any other brand of Nforce2 any day of the week."

What are you measuring - price, features or performance? I would guess that very few people knowingly buy an ECS MB, they get one when they buy a cheap computer.

metla
23-09-2004, 04:10 PM
>>What are you measuring - price, features or performance?

all three,plus stability.

And i get quite a few people "knowingly" buying ECS boards.

the highlander
23-09-2004, 07:35 PM
"Wouldnt that be a bad thing? The extra plug on the motherboard is there for a reason."

No quite the opposite, saved them from buying a new p4 p/s or adapter.
And yes it is there for a reason but asrock managed to get around it and utilise older power supplies with the mobo design. Out of the 20 odd I've used 19 are still going strong.
They have dropped it now though.

the highlander
23-09-2004, 07:45 PM
"And i get quite a few people "knowingly" buying ECS boards."

I have had some bad experiences with ecs/pc chips boards and while they have no doubt improved their record and got there manure together, buying one again is another thing. Once bitten many times shy. The same thing would occur if my beloved asus boards spit the collective dummies on me. I probably wouldn't touch them with a barge pole.

Pete O\'Neil
23-09-2004, 07:59 PM
> No quite the opposite, saved them from buying a new
> p4 p/s or adapter.
> And yes it is there for a reason but asrock managed
> to get around it and utilise older power supplies
> with the mobo design. Out of the 20 odd I've used 19
> are still going strong.
> They have dropped it now though.
Care to explain how Asrock managed to get around the problem? I really do doubt that some how Asrock magically figured out how to obtain more current from the 12v rail while still maintaining a stabily and usable power source. Just because a motherboard doesnt have the extra plug doesnt mean it should have been removed. The extra plug gives the motherboard/CPU its own dedicated 12v rail, thus providing a smoother and more consistant power supply. Not using this extra connector can result in system instability.

It really does depend on the hardware used, im guessing most of the systems youve built for family are pretty basic possibly consisting of 1 optical drive and 1 harddrive. A setup such as that probably wouldnt tax the 12v rail all that much and would probably be the reason everything is running fine. I'd be interested to know what sort of PSU's youve been using? From what youve said it seems your using quite old PSU's possibly from older P3 or P2 systems? Unless they are particularly high quality i would be surprised to hear your not suffering from stability problems?

the highlander
23-09-2004, 08:24 PM
"It really does depend on the hardware used, im guessing most of the systems youve built for family are pretty basic"

Right on the nail. All (well almost) were used to upgrade p2s and early k6 systems at the most basic level. Use power supply, existing optical drives,cases floppies, operating system, ditch crappy vid cards and use onboard vga and use existing modem hardrives etc etc. New mobo, mem and cpu went in. Not pretty but a hell of an improvement over a cyrix m2 or a cacheless celeron 266.
And you are correct some of the power supplies were probably verging on barely adequete (some downright ugly) but none of them were ever likely to drop in a tv tuner card or other hungry periphials.
never had any of these systems exhibit any symptoms of instability on these boards that can be attributed to p/s problems. In fact, apart from a leaking capacitor on one they all have been remarkably stable. I get see them on a regular basis due to usual wetware problems no hardware.
As to how asrock did it . I don't know. I don't proffess to know squat about power supplies apart from its bad to stick a butter knife into one.

PaulD
24-09-2004, 10:46 AM
"The extra plug gives the motherboard/CPU its own dedicated 12v rail, thus providing a smoother and more consistant power supply. Not using this extra connector can result in system instability."

Only very latest ATX spec has provision for 2 +12V rails. The earlier "P4" connector was purely because the amount of +12V drawn by the MB from the PSU was more than the existing single pin in the ATX connector was rated for. The extra plug was to prevent voltage drop and plug melt down.

angstrom
08-06-2005, 12:18 PM
I've set up two axper mobos using P4 3.0ghz processors. I used XP-P51M800GV. The mobos are great at the price. Don't expect whizz bangs. They come with all the right built ins including 2 sata ports and having a slot for a separate video card (AGU).
It also supports dual channel DDR400. The north bridge uses intel 865GV chipset.
Only grouse I have is that there are only 2 DDR dimm slots.
There are 4 usb at the rear and 2 more on the board for front connection.
This board allows you to use the older 478 Power pack as it requires the 20 pin ATX power connector. The ATX 12 volt connector connects slightly behind the processor. The snag here is, you have to remove the powerpack to connect the 12 volt connector. Otherwise, you must have dainty hands or use tweezers if you you don't want to balance the powerpack wile connecting.

On the whole, it was easy to setup and run.

Try it. You may like it....